Health Officials: Hep C outbreak caused by nurse

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    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP)-Health officials say a hepatitis C outbreak was caused by a nurse at a Gulf coast-area holistic medical clinic.

    Health News Florida reported Thursday eight patients tested positive for hepatitis C. One of them may have had it before going to the Wellness Works clinic in Brandon.

    Health officials didn't immediately respond to requests about the nurse's identity and whether she is still allowed to practice.

    Officials say exposure occurred last year among patients who had chelation therapy, a blood treatment. The nurse was fired.
    http://www.baltimoresun.com/topic/os...,1800604.story
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  3. Visit  TheCommuter profile page

    About TheCommuter, BSN, RN

    TheCommuter has '9' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'acute rehabilitation (CRRN), LTC & psych'. From 'Fort Worth, Texas, USA'; 34 Years Old; Joined Feb '05; Posts: 29,526; Likes: 45,330. You can follow TheCommuter at My Website

    13 Comments so far...

  4. Visit  caliotter3 profile page
    0
    I would wonder if the nurse was fired because she had the disease or because she knew she had the disease and did not report it or otherwise do anything to prevent what happened. The story as reported did not say enough.
  5. Visit  Lisa, MA profile page
    0
    I don't beleive you have to report HCV to your employers.
  6. Visit  BabyLady profile page
    0
    Hep C is transmitted the same way that HIV is transmitted, via body fluids.

    I would wager someone was reusing tubing or not using new equipment or cleaning it properly...hard to say because I have never performed this kind of therapy.

    This article did a grave disservice in reporting what happened because it makes it look like the nurse was Hep C positive when she may not be a carrier at all....but one of the patients she treated first may have been and that is how the rest became infected.
  7. Visit  Kashia profile page
    0
    I wonder how they came to conclusion she caused this? Hep C is now in epidemic proportions and to be quite frank it is not entirely known all the ways it is transmitted. It is not a reportable disease. I read that at a Hep C conference they offered to test anyone willing to test. Large percentage of participants ( health care professionals) tested positive
  8. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    1
    Quote from Kashia
    Hep C is now in epidemic proportions and to be quite frank it is not entirely known all the ways it is transmitted.
    I agree. It is estimated that more than 4 million American people are infected with Hepatitis C, and many are unaware that they even have this deadly virus. The number of HCV+ people greatly exceeds the number of HIV+ people in the U.S. and worldwide. A person can live with Hepatitis C, feel fine, and be asymptomatic for 30 or more years.
    SuesquatchRN likes this.
  9. Visit  BabyLady profile page
    0
    Quote from Kashia
    I wonder how they came to conclusion she caused this? Hep C is now in epidemic proportions and to be quite frank it is not entirely known all the ways it is transmitted. It is not a reportable disease. I read that at a Hep C conference they offered to test anyone willing to test. Large percentage of participants ( health care professionals) tested positive
    I think one of the reasons why the instance of it is so high is how many times do you ever hear it talked about to the general public?

    One of the things that I have done for years is every time I see an article published (in layperson's magazines such as fashion, People, newspapers, etc) on sexually transmitted diseases...you never see Hepatitis C listed....and sex is the #1 method of transmission.

    People don't even know it can be deadly and is incurable and that there is no vaccine....they assume there is because we have vaccines available for Hep A and B.

    A very high number of HIV positive individuals also have Hepatitis C...so much so that before they developed a test for HIV, they were testing the blood supply for Hepatitis because the correlation was so high.

    Like HIV, I personally don't see the mystery in Hepatitis C transmission..it is simply more common because it's been around a lot longer.
  10. Visit  Lisa, MA profile page
    0
    Quote from Kashia
    It is not a reportable disease.
    On the contrary, anyone diagnosed with HCV does have this reported to their local board of health. Which then goes into a national database.
  11. Visit  Lisa, MA profile page
    1
    Quote from BabyLady
    One of the things that I have done for years is every time I see an article published (in layperson's magazines such as fashion, People, newspapers, etc) on sexually transmitted diseases...you never see Hepatitis C listed....and sex is the #1 method of transmission.
    Actually, sexual transmission is negligible with HCV. The most common forms of transmission are IV drug use and blood transfusion (esp prior to 1989). Ironically, donated organs are NOT declined due to HCV infection in the donor.
    Virgo_RN likes this.
  12. Visit  Chisca profile page
    0
    Quote from Lisa, MA
    Actually, sexual transmission is negligible with HCV. The most common forms of transmission are IV drug use and blood transfusion (esp prior to 1989). Ironically, donated organs are NOT declined due to HCV infection in the donor.
    True, but they are only used in patients that already have hep c.
  13. Visit  Hushdawg profile page
    0
    One of the staff in the office of a company I deal with contracted Hepa B and I did some reading up on the virus. Turns out that both Heba B and C can live outside the human body for an insane length of time; as in an infected person can bite his cheek, sneeze and the blood-tinged spittle would contain the virus which can survive up to a week in the right conditions.

    That absolutely startles me since you could pick up Hepa casually in this manner.

    Hepa A is scarier, it can survive for months and will even live in open sea water.
  14. Visit  Virgo_RN profile page
    3
    Quote from BabyLady
    One of the things that I have done for years is every time I see an article published (in layperson's magazines such as fashion, People, newspapers, etc) on sexually transmitted diseases...you never see Hepatitis C listed....and sex is the #1 method of transmission.
    No, it is not.

    "Today, sharing needles for injection drug use is the most common cause of new hepatitis C infection in the United States, accounting for over two thirds of all new cases."

    and

    "The risk of transmission during sex is not precisely known but is thought to be quite low. The risk of transmission is less than 3% for partners of hepatitis C infected persons involved in a monogamous relationship."

    Source: http://www.pegasys.com/basics/hepatitis-c-spread.aspx

    People don't even know it can be deadly and is incurable and that there is no vaccine....they assume there is because we have vaccines available for Hep A and B.
    Not exactly.

    "Combination therapy leads to rapid improvements in serum ALT levels and disappearance of detectable HCV RNA in up to 70 percent of patients."

    Source: http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddise...chronichepc/#g
  15. Visit  Virgo_RN profile page
    1
    Quote from Hushdawg
    One of the staff in the office of a company I deal with contracted Hepa B and I did some reading up on the virus. Turns out that both Heba B and C can live outside the human body for an insane length of time; as in an infected person can bite his cheek, sneeze and the blood-tinged spittle would contain the virus which can survive up to a week in the right conditions.

    That absolutely startles me since you could pick up Hepa casually in this manner.

    Hepa A is scarier, it can survive for months and will even live in open sea water.
    Hepatitis C is not spread by casual contact, and the chances of contracting it as described are miniscule. The virus must be introduced into the blood stream. Even with needlesticks, risk of infection is only 1.8%.

    Source: http://www.medicinenet.com/hepatitis_c/page2.htm#spread
    ♪♫ in my ♥ likes this.


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