Health Officials: Hep C outbreak caused by nurse - page 2

by TheCommuter Asst. Admin

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  1. 0
    One of the staff in the office of a company I deal with contracted Hepa B and I did some reading up on the virus. Turns out that both Heba B and C can live outside the human body for an insane length of time; as in an infected person can bite his cheek, sneeze and the blood-tinged spittle would contain the virus which can survive up to a week in the right conditions.

    That absolutely startles me since you could pick up Hepa casually in this manner.

    Hepa A is scarier, it can survive for months and will even live in open sea water.
  2. 3
    Quote from BabyLady
    One of the things that I have done for years is every time I see an article published (in layperson's magazines such as fashion, People, newspapers, etc) on sexually transmitted diseases...you never see Hepatitis C listed....and sex is the #1 method of transmission.
    No, it is not.

    "Today, sharing needles for injection drug use is the most common cause of new hepatitis C infection in the United States, accounting for over two thirds of all new cases."

    and

    "The risk of transmission during sex is not precisely known but is thought to be quite low. The risk of transmission is less than 3% for partners of hepatitis C infected persons involved in a monogamous relationship."

    Source: http://www.pegasys.com/basics/hepatitis-c-spread.aspx

    People don't even know it can be deadly and is incurable and that there is no vaccine....they assume there is because we have vaccines available for Hep A and B.
    Not exactly.

    "Combination therapy leads to rapid improvements in serum ALT levels and disappearance of detectable HCV RNA in up to 70 percent of patients."

    Source: http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddise...chronichepc/#g
  3. 1
    Quote from Hushdawg
    One of the staff in the office of a company I deal with contracted Hepa B and I did some reading up on the virus. Turns out that both Heba B and C can live outside the human body for an insane length of time; as in an infected person can bite his cheek, sneeze and the blood-tinged spittle would contain the virus which can survive up to a week in the right conditions.

    That absolutely startles me since you could pick up Hepa casually in this manner.

    Hepa A is scarier, it can survive for months and will even live in open sea water.
    Hepatitis C is not spread by casual contact, and the chances of contracting it as described are miniscule. The virus must be introduced into the blood stream. Even with needlesticks, risk of infection is only 1.8%.

    Source: http://www.medicinenet.com/hepatitis_c/page2.htm#spread
    ♪♫ in my ♥ likes this.
  4. 0
    Looks like they think the nurse was reusing syringes.

    http://www.tampabay.com/news/health/...randon/1081258


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