Health Care for All, Just a (Big) Step Away - page 3

YOU may find it shameful that some 45 million Americans lack health insurance. Well, by reallocating money already devoted to health insurance, the government could go along way toward solving the... Read More

  1. by   soliant12
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    I just cannot get how we can debate providing for basic healthcare for all citizens. It's amazing to me anyone thinks it should be a privelege for a shrinking few.
    Everyone has access to health care. I do not believe that responsible taxpayers should be footing the bill for smokers, over weight patients, drug addicts and the asorted groups that consistently make bad choices in life. My taxes are already high enough, and we have the wealthiest poor in the world in this country who have so many programs available to them it is unbelievable.
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    And we h ave a segment of working poor who have no real access at all. Something has to be done....
  3. by   Fuzzy
    Heck, I would be happy with just some affordable healthcare. I'm not insurable because of pre-existing conditions that I had the misfortune of being born with. Oh wait, there's the state plan but it's priced out of reach for me as I don't make much money in my one income household. The doctor wants me to have the yearly mammagram, PAP, etc. Sure I can pay for the tests but should something be found--I definately couldn't pay for for the treatment. So I haven't had them done. BTW, I'm 47 and I've had only 1 PAP and 0 mammograms and my mother died of cancer. When that happened, my father had to declare bankruptcy because of the medical bills. This was 30 years ago. I just had my gall bladder out (I had been suffering from gallstones for 10 years) in Aug. I know how much that costs and it'll take me around 8 years to get the bills paid off. I'm glad that people are patient. If not there's always bankruptcy I guess.

    Fuzzy
  4. by   pugmum
    Quote from Fonenurse
    I agree EinnOgTveir. In the UK we have a mixture of free and private schemes. I believe 100% in the NHS which is free at the point of contact. This provides excellent emergency care (incidentally I would never go to a private hospital for emergency care) and the things that have waiting lists - orthopaedic and surgical cases can be waited for or paid for by private health care depending on the patient. Let's face it, we haven't got a bottomless pit of money, and due to the ever improving care there is out there it costs more and more each year. I think a system that allows for both private and 'paid through taxes' is best - at least it treats all human beings as the same - and those that are really well off can pay for 'the extras'. ...
    I have to agree, in Canada we tend to view health care as a basic human right. I am not denying it is prohibitively expensive at times and we do have waiting lists for certain procedures, and there will always be people who abuse the system (many years in ER have shown me how true this is).

    BUT, our health care system is there when needed. Take me for example. Last Thursday I had to see my doctor...yesterday i had to go back, because i have now developed pneumonia...today my daughter went because she has a horrendous sinus infection (that darn bug took out my family except for my husband!) Six zithrovax pills were $42.00 (Canadian), and my daughter's 10 day supply of clarithomycin would have been $76.00. We paid not a penny for three doctor's visits or for the prescriptions, as they are covered by employee benefits. Do I feel lucky? You bet.

    sickandtired
  5. by   pannie
    I was asked to help sign families up for Texas children's insurance program. It was sliding scale. It was the most frustrating thing I've ever been involved in. Parents just weren't interested in paying even $28 a month (remember sliding scale so that would cover ALL children in the family for the poorest) when they could pay NOTHING by going to Parkland. But then complained about having to wait hours at Parkland. I just don't get it. I've met lots of people who make the decision not to avail themselves of insurance. They need their cable, internet provider, etc. more. It was very frustrating trying to sign people up with the cable channel blaring, too.
  6. by   StNeotser
    Did anyone take note of the recent budget bill that took $16bn from Medicaid recipients over the next 10 years? There was a Senate bill that proposed to eliminate a $10bn fund given to PPO's to participate in the Medicare program.

    Why did the bill taking $16bn away from people dependent on Medicaid pass when the part taking $10bn from corporations failed?

    Because some Americans are too worried about poor and indigent people taking from their tax money. PPO's obviously can take what they want from your tax money.

    To those who have posted about "crummy healthcare" in countries with Universal healthcare, I would like to know if you've ever lived in one of those countries. I am from the UK and would have the NHS over my PPO in the USA any day. I think that if there were some limits set on HMO's and PPO's maybe healthcare in the USA could be better delivered. Whilst Universal Healthcare is not perfect, it does not ignore almost 20% of the population. There is an obvious lack of choice in the USA, as you do pretty much have to go with whatever healthcare plan your employer offers you. With a single payer system you can choose doctors who are not in the network, for there is no network.

    When I first came to the USA in 1999 healthcare costs, copays and premiums were not so bad but they seem to have skyrocketed in the past five years.

    Companies are outsourcing jobs overseas not only because Americans want better pay than workers in a third world country but also because the increasing cost of healthcare benefits in this country.

    Ask anyone in a country with Universal Healthcare if they've had to file bankrupcy or lost their house due to medical bills - you won't find one.

    I do think that the private system was working, however healthcare providers seem to be absolutely out of control now.
    Last edit by StNeotser on Dec 29, '05
  7. by   CseMgr1
    My sister just had to borrow $4,000 at 23% APR before her dentist would even schedule her for dental surgery (eight of her teeth are rotten and broken off, requiring pulling and the placement of temporary implants). Same old, same old: Her employer, who is richer than Midas, doesn't offer any health benefits. :angryfire
  8. by   CseMgr1
    Quote from StNeotser
    Ask anyone in a country with Universal Healthcare if they've had to file bankrupcy or lost their house due to medical bills - you won't find one.
    My late mother and father were forced into bankruptcy twice.... because of inadequate health care coverage. It was only after they signed up with AARP that they were able to get any relief. My mother's pharmacy bill alone just before she died was over $500/month....
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...DGG6GDPDA1.DTL

    Two women, two cancers, two health-care systems
  10. by   hope3456
    What makes me the maddest is when the subject of universal care/ single payor health care comes up with the politicians, it seems they start telling horror stories of countries that do have it- like in England old people are afraid to go to the doctor/hospital, ect. Also they say that you can't have health care for free....and that competition is better for the industry.

    By no means, do i think that I should get free health care. I am willing to pay for my health care, but I think I should be charged a fair price. I do not want to be gouged by the provider. If you look back on previous pages, I told of the problem i had with just having simple lab tests done. the hosp wanted to charge me 400.00 (I wasn't sure if I was insured at the time of the tests and told them i wasn't) and then when I sent the bill to my ins co they settled with the hosp for the "contracted amt" - 77.00. This is an example of what is the most scary. I called the hosp for an explanation and the "financial representative" was an expert at beating around the bush and not giving a direct answer to my questions. I am sure a very valuable employee to the hosp. This is just a small example - but it happens to people all the time on a much larger scale.

    From my understanding, if you are middle class or above, own assets such as a home, savings accts, ect and don't have insurance and need medical care from a hospital, you are pretty much screwed. If the hosp. knows you are worth something, they will come after you full force, but if you own nothing - they leave you alone and write you off. There are no regulations on what hospitals can charge private pay patients, and this is where they make their money. If you are insured - even with a high deductible, the hosp has to charge you the "contracted amt" that they have negotiated with the ins co - usually far less than the amt they would charge the pt. w/ no coverage at all.

    I don't like being played for a fool - and that is what our health care system is doing to the american people and we are starting to take notice.

    However, for any major change to come from our politicians, we as americans are going to have to riot. After all, the health care and pharmaceutical industries are some of the most powerful lobbyist groups in D.C. (so I have heard).

    I am scared to be w/o health coverage - and this dilemma is what I see as the major threat to me being able to raise my child the way I see fit - I need to work full time to keep my ins., not spend time with my child. it is often in the back of my mind how I could liquidate my assetts and become eligble for state coverage - just so I wouldn't have to work - or as much - so I could be the parent i want to be.

    I don't think it is right to do this, but I don't feel I have an option. Again, I am willing to pay for medical care, but there is no middle ground. I know many young mothers who have their kids on medicaid, live in govt funded housing, and seem to do just fine. I guess it is all in how your assetts look on paper. I don't know all the secrets yet to doing this. Excuse me for going to school and getting a decent paying job - it is now really conflicting with my moral values.

    The more I learn about the U.S. health care system, the more worried i get. I see the cost of health ins - or being w/o it- as one of the major threats to our society - in a variety of ways.
  11. by   SFCardiacRN
    Can anyone guess why nurses from countries with universal health care are coming to the US for work? Can anyone guess where the money will come from to pay for universal health care? Remember, nursing pay is the single biggest expense of every hospital.
  12. by   Kim O'Therapy
    Quote from pannie
    I was asked to help sign families up for Texas children's insurance program. It was sliding scale. It was the most frustrating thing I've ever been involved in. Parents just weren't interested in paying even $28 a month (remember sliding scale so that would cover ALL children in the family for the poorest) when they could pay NOTHING by going to Parkland. But then complained about having to wait hours at Parkland. I just don't get it. I've met lots of people who make the decision not to avail themselves of insurance. They need their cable, internet provider, etc. more. It was very frustrating trying to sign people up with the cable channel blaring, too.
    :yeahthat:
  13. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from SFCardiacRN
    Can anyone guess why nurses from countries with universal health care are coming to the US for work? Can anyone guess where the money will come from to pay for universal health care? Remember, nursing pay is the single biggest expense of every hospital.
    Nursing care is the purpose of the hospital.

close