Hawai'i nursing shortage critical - Honolulu Advertiser - page 2

hawai'i nursing shortage critical hale makua, a maui-based care home, couldn't make use of all its 254 beds in kahului last week because it couldn't find enough workers in the midst of a nursing... Read More

  1. by   RN BSN 2009
    hmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm tropical paradise hell lol
  2. by   mcubed45
    Quote from Kabin
    If nothing else your anedotal information proves one can live in Hawaii and still be uninformed as you seriously lack knowledge on this well documented topic.

    I've been to the Hawaiian islands at least a half dozen times and have heard numerous first hand accounts from "non-natives" that grew up in the Hawaiian school system and they validate the issue. Just two nights ago on Discover HD channel they presented the 2004 show 'Riding Giants' where they interviewed Laird Hamilton, a white virtual native giant wave riding world champion and he discussed what it was like to grow up in the Hawaiian school system and having to defend yourself because of your skin and hair color.

    I could gather many more but here's a 1999 article about a legislative bill to address hate crimes linked to "kill haole day" in Hawaii public schools.


    http://starbulletin.com/1999/03/24/news/story7.html


    i'll admit that i was not familiar with "kill haole day" but there's a good reason for it. i didn't grow up in the 60's or 70's. if such hate crimes were still an issue in Hawaii there is no doubt that it would be all over the news. while this may be a "well documented" issue, it's hardly a current one. i'm not saying there are no racist people in Hawaii - on the contrary, you will find them no matter where you live. however, the picture you're attempting to paint of PRESENT-day Hawaii is quite far from reality.


    in either case "kill kaole day" and any anti-haole discirimination of the past has nothing to do with the other poster's claims of being denied admittence into KCC's nursing school. as stated that's purely an in-state/out-of-state student distinction.
  3. by   worf
    Quote from mcubed45
    in either case "kill kaole day" and any anti-haole discirimination of the past has nothing to do with the other poster's claims of being denied admittence into KCC's nursing school. as stated that's purely an in-state/out-of-state student distinction.
    Not true. I am an in-state tution paying resident, I am just not a "local". It's just the point that an advisor told me "not to waste my time" applying at KCC. I should have pursued it further. It's too late now, I am already in school elsewhere, but I should have applied anyway to see what happened. (KCC lost out on a great student!)

    BTW-A local-is someone who grew up in Hawaii, and has Hawaiian blood, and speaks the language.

    I know there are other colleges that provide a nursing program, but KCC is the only one with an ADN which is what I wanted not a BSN.
    Last edit by worf on Mar 22, '07
  4. by   mcubed45
    Quote from bg_renfrow
    BTW-A local-is someone who grew up in Hawaii, and has Hawaiian blood, and speaks the language.
    again this is completely wrong.

    there are many students enrolled in the KCC program with zero Hawaiian ancestry. the Hawaiian language is also quickly dying out and the majority of Hawaiian people actually do not speak much Hawaiian. i think you're a little confused as to the distinction between ethnicity and nationality. i also realize some states like to refer to their residents with names like "californian, texan, etc". however this is NOT done in Hawaii because Hawaiian refers to an ETHNIC background, not the state you were born/live in.

    Hawaiian ancestry has nothing to do with where you're born. it's an ethnicity like any other (German, Japanese, Italian, etc.) and has to do with your geneologic roots. Hawaiian is also NOT a nationality like "American". nationality refers to your country of birth/citzenship. Hawaii is not a country (you'd be surprised how many people don't realize Hawaii is part of the United States).

    I am 100% Japanese, born and raised in Hawaii with english as my first language (i also speak a little Japanese and Hawaiian). Therefore my ethnicity is Japanese but by nationality is American. I am not Hawaiian. Hawaii is nothing more than my state of birth and state of residence. however, i AM local.

    if you are a current Hawaii resident with OFFICIAL residency status then your birth place should have no bearing on your application.

    no offense, but i don't think you quite understand the differences between local and having Hawaiian ancestry...
    Last edit by mcubed45 on Mar 22, '07
  5. by   oramar
    In the past I was told that this particular state discouraged nurses moving from mainland to get jobs there. Is this policy part of the problem? Before they start importing nurses from other countries(which I suspect this might be all about) I want to hear that they are allowing people to move from mainland.
  6. by   mcubed45
    Quote from oramar
    In the past I was told that this particular state discouraged nurses moving from mainland to get jobs there. Is this policy part of the problem? Before they start importing nurses from other countries(which I suspect this might be all about) I want to hear that they are allowing people to move from mainland.
    yes Hawaii does have a problem with many of it's top students moving to the mainland because of better job oppurtunities and a lower cost of living. however this has nothing to do making a distinction between residents and non-residents. this is common with ALL public universities.

    as long as your are an OFFICIAL resident of hawaii there is no distinction to be made. many pre-college students in hawaii were not born here. we have many immigrants and many children of military parents stationed in hawaii. if they were to make a distinction based on place of BIRTH, there would be A LOT of inelgible students. that's the whole purpose behind establishing residency.
    Last edit by mcubed45 on Mar 22, '07
  7. by   TrudyRN
    Oh, my, trouble in paradise.
  8. by   BillEDRN
    Quote from bg_renfrow
    Not true. I am an in-state tution paying resident, I am just not a "local". It's just the point that an advisor told me "not to waste my time" applying at KCC. I should have pursued it further. It's too late now, I am already in school elsewhere, but I should have applied anyway to see what happened. (KCC lost out on a great student!)

    BTW-A local-is someone who grew up in Hawaii, and has Hawaiian blood, and speaks the language.

    I know there are other colleges that provide a nursing program, but KCC is the only one with an ADN which is what I wanted not a BSN.
    As a long-time haole resident, I have seen haoles graduate from KCC. I am not disputing your recollection of the events you describe, just noting that there seems to be some discrepancies in your statement of facts. I am not sure what you mean when you stated you were "an in-state tuition paying resident" but I assume you mean that you lived here and had otherwise met residency requirements for the program. If that is the case, you should have pursued it. Although it is rare, there is still some discrimination against haoles; I know, i've experienced it first hand. However, discrimination should not be tolerated, and if you were the target of such discrimination, it should have been brought to the attention of the proper authorities.
  9. by   kukukajoo
    Nobody has answered the question that has been asked- are mainlanders discouraged from getting a job in Hawaii?

    What's with the double standard- must have a license to get job, but can't get license until you have job? Whats the way around that?

    Just a curious haole mainlander sick of the snow in the Northeast!
  10. by   RNHawaii34
    [quote=kukukajoo;2126804]nobody has answered the question that has been asked- are mainlanders discouraged from getting a job in hawaii?
    anyone from the mainland or any part of the world is welcome to work in hawaii. there are alot of nurses who works here that are from the u.s. mainland. any hospitals or facility you go in hawaii have a lot of mainland nurses, and hearing mainlanders are discourage to work in hawaii is ridiculous and unheard of.

    what's with the double standard- must have a license to get job, but can't get license until you have job? whats the way around that?
    maybe what they meant was, if you have a non hawaii rn license, you are not allowed to work, unless you apply for a job then you can have your license endorsed? my license was originally from california, and i couldn't find a job until i had it endorsed to hawaii..if still unclear, maybe check the hawaii board of nurses.
  11. by   mo-mo
    Just gonna jump in here and throw in my $0.02. As a haole living in Hawaii, I DEFINITELY sense some discrimination against whites. My kids experience it in school, I experience it out and about.

    People will say that its more about being 'mainland ' vs 'local' and that may be true. But being brown instead of white definitely helps, b/c people assume you are local; and if you are white, it's assumed that you aren't. (at least that's how it is on the rural island that I live on)

    My son is a smart kid...In kindergarten, after being picked on in school for a couple days (including punches and shoves), he quickly picked up the local dialect (pidgin) and learned how to act local. My daughter is really friendly and still took a long time finding friends. I heard the half-joking phrases 'f-ing haoles' and 'stupid haoles' a lot.

    At the same time, my neighbors and coworkers have adopted us as family in a more loving and caring way than I've ever experienced on the mainland (and I've moved around a lot!). Work Christmas parties are all-day whole family affairs. (You are expected to bring your kids not find a sitter!)My kids and the neighbor kids go house-to-house and yard-to-yard freely, like family. Patients have come to my door with bagfuls of fresh veggies or baked goods to share, and I didn't even tell them where I live!

    I've been here almost 2 years and I'm still trying to wrap my mind and my mannerisms around this culture. It's subtle and tricky:
    'Aloha' isn't about just being welcome to come and enjoy and take what you want, and the sweet happy Hawaiian will offer up more. However to typical American culture, thats what it LOOKS LIKE. Im finding that it's more about exchange, but in a subtle, gracious, almost invisible way. (Hint: food ALWAYS works! No food? Try flowers!)
    'Ohana' isn't just about family by bloodline. You can become part of an Hawaiian ohana, but DONT invite yourself, they gotta invite you in.

    I'm in no way an expert, and this has just been my experience here. I'm still learning and still trying cuz I love this place and this culture and these locals. I've been able to get to know people on that level that we nurses are luck to experience with other people; that level that transcends race and culture. Hawaii's a fit for me and my family for now.

    Some people move out here and hate it. Some never leave. Don't move here thinking its gonna be just like an extension of the mainland (it's not). And don't believe that every local is gonna hate you and alienate you b/c you're white or black or whatever(some might, but most won't; just like anywhere else in the US).

    We do need nurses out here. If you are up for the challenge, come on down! I don't know about the other islands, but I know the hospitals here on the island of Hawaii (aka The Big Island)take new grads. With the nursing shortage, I cant imagine too many places that would turn new grads down (except specialty areas).

    ...Okay, I guess that was more than .

    Aloha!
  12. by   PACNWNURSING
    The other factor, how is the cost of living? Are the salaries that are offered a living wage? What is the housing situation ? Do you have to live in a Condo or Apartment while there? I was stationed there for over 3 years in the Navy and I wondered how the locals made it financially. Could this be the reason doctors and nurses are headed to the mainland ?
  13. by   mo-mo
    BINGO!
    It's crazy expensive to live here. Pay is decent and gets better every year (I have 7 yrs experience, make @ $38/hr + charge pay and eve/noc differentials) But everything is expensive here; groceries gas, housing, utilities, childcare. I think that docs have it even harder, as medicare reimburses at a flat rate no matter where you live (I think thats how it works, anyway!)

    Good thing the beach and the rainbows and the waterfalls and the fruit in my backyard and the perfect climate are free!

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