"God Help You. You're on Dialysis.”

  1. 4
    Every year, more than 100,000 Americans start dialysis. One in four of them will die within 12 months—a fatality rate that is one of the worst in the industrialized world. Oh, and dialysis arguably costs more here than anywhere else. Although taxpayers cover most of the bill, the government has kept confidential clinic data that could help patients make better decisions. How did our first foray into near-universal coverage, begun four decades ago with such great hope, turn out this way? And what lessons does it hold for the future of health-care reform?
    - Magazine - The Atlantic
  2. 38 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    "The pace can be so intense, inspections show, that clinics have allowed patients to soil themselves rather than interrupt dialysis for a bathroom break."

    We've had a few threads on this.
  4. 2
    that had to be one of the more depressing articles i've recently read.
    shame on us...the treaters and our govt, who hasn't set up tighter regs.

    i'm really disgusted.

    leslie
    NDXUFan and Jessy_RN like this.
  5. 1
    Had a dialysis pt. once with a high-stage decub to sacrum. The center wouldn't even reposition them or use the pressure-relief cushion we sent - "it might affect how the machine runs." "We have too many patients to do this." Pt. elected to go off dialysis, onto hospice.
    FranEMTnurse likes this.
  6. 0
    I really thought I had heard it all, but the greed portrayed in this article has me truly frightened.

    We commoners truly are just not worth much, it seems - only as much as the insurers will pay to thieving business operators and their complicit doctors.
  7. 1
    Not to mention the for-profit aspects of it. McDialysis, anybody?
    NDXUFan likes this.
  8. 3
    Id rather be dead than on dialysis.
    NDXUFan, Gratefulprn, and rph3664 like this.
  9. 2
    This article is so disheartening to me, and I believe things will only get worse with health care reform. Not only is this showing incompetency but also just a lack of human caring. It also is a great example of how patients and families need a strong advocate every step of the way in the health care maze today
    Gratefulprn and FranEMTnurse like this.
  10. 2
    I worked in dialysis for 14 months as an RN for Fresenius, one of the giants mentioned in the article. It is this bad. Our clinic was understaffed and we had high acuity patients from a local veterans home - amputees, big co-morbids. .I left this clinic, as I was terrified every day that something big was going to happen, and I would be the one thrown under the bus. Best nursing decision I've made.
    blondy2061h and lilaclover like this.
  11. 2
    Quote from tralalaRN
    I worked in dialysis for 14 months as an RN for Fresenius, one of the giants mentioned in the article. It is this bad. Our clinic was understaffed and we had high acuity patients from a local veterans home - amputees, big co-morbids. .I left this clinic, as I was terrified every day that something big was going to happen, and I would be the one thrown under the bus. Best nursing decision I've made.
    Good for you for leaving that environment. It is so sad to think that patients are treated like this.
    FranEMTnurse and blondy2061h like this.


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