‘Glass Escalators’ Move Pink-Collar Guys Ahead

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    Once upon a time, not so very long ago, men who went into nursing or elementary school teaching were seen as less than macho.
    In the popular 2004 movie “Meet the Fockers” the fact that Ben Stiller was a male nurse was a running gag throughout the film.

    But attitudes are shifting fast in our hard-pressed economy. Men are now gravitating toward female-dominated occupations, according to a recent analysis of census data by the New York Times.

    http://womensenews.org/story/equal-p...lar-guys-ahead

    And:
    http://www.forbes.com/sites/jennagou...ass-escalator/
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  4. 2
    for some reason, i'm not allowed to post a reply to the glass escalator thread, the gist of which is that white males are given preference over females and persons of other races, so i'll put it here:

    a decade or so ago, my dear husband and i, both nurses, took a travel assignment and moved to a new city. within days, i decided that i really wanted to work at the big city hospital where the sickest patients were sent. i put together an polished an impressive resume and the perfect cover letter and went off to apply to the icu at big city hospital. i interviewed and was hired, to start at a date two months in the future when our travel contract was completed. dh waited until the travel contract was completed, then decided he'd like to work in the icu at big city hospital also. he called up, spoke to the manager and went in for an interview the next day. he was also hired, to start the same day as me.

    i had five years more nursing experience than dh, i had experience with the same patient population as the icu at big city hospital, and i had a bsn and a master's to dh's adn. we were hired at the same salary. from the first, i was involved in education and special projects based on the work i had done in my previous position. dh worked his 12 hours and went home. as we came off orientation and seniority became important, i noticed that dh was listed as senior to me on the seniority list. both the assistant manager and the manager were dumbfounded when i asked why. we started on the same date, but i was hired first.

    the career ladder in the icu at bch was well-documented. in order to advance from rni to rnii, one had to work in the unit for a year, complete a project, join and become active in a committee and attend two seminars on your own time. i completed the project, joined and became co-chair of a committee and attended the seminars. yet at my yearly evaluation, i was not given the advancement to rnii or the 5% raise that came with it. i was told to "keep on doing what you're doing and we'll see next year." dh was given the advancement and the 5% raise even though the only one of the objectives he had completed was working on the unit for a year. he hadn't started a project, joined a committee or signed up for the seminars. it wasn't that i had screwed up or gotten into trouble, although dh was written up twice.

    about a year and a half later, i was given the advancement i had earned and the raise. by this time, dh had had three subsequent raises, each based on a percentage of his (now higher) salary. ten years passed. by now, he is making more than a dollar an hour more than me . . . and i still have more education, more experience and am more involved in unit projects. in frustration, i asked him what i was doing wrong. "you're not a white male," he said.

    so there you have it. the glass escalator is alive and well at big city hospital.
    tewdles and KeyMaster like this.
  5. 1
    Merged threads..
    AnonRNC likes this.
  6. 0
    Absolutely right. I see men rising quickly into middle-management as well, bypassing women, and then going ahead and having kids, taking a paternity leave, leaving work early to be with the kids, etc, while women (qualified, organized, more-than-capable of managing a staff) continue to cite family involvement as the very thing that keeps them from rising into management.
  7. 0
    "Donning the pink collar"

    http://www.nytimes.com/video/2012/05...nk-collar.html

    This seemed appropriate for this thread.
  8. 1
    Every time this subject comes up, I'm reminded of a conversation I had 'way back in nursing school in the Dark Ages (early '80s, actually), with the husband of a friend. He was an attorney and had nothing to do with anything in nursing or the larger healthcare community. I had originally met this friend in the local NOW chapter, and all three of us were ardent feminists. I was burbling on happily about the value and importance of recruiting more men into nursing, which was a hot topic at the time (and there were four male students in my freshman class of nearly 100!), and this male attorney acquaintance cut me off to explain that nurses were crazy to not only let men into nursing, but actually encourage them to enter -- "Don't you realize, the men will take all the good jobs, they'll all get promotions and cushy jobs, and you (the female nurses) will still be hustling up and down halls, emptying bedpans! Nursing and teaching are the only professions in which women have the advantage and run everything, why on earth would you want to give that up?" His opinion was that we should be fighting tooth and nail to keep men out of nursing. It sounded like crazy talk to me at the time, but I've reflected on that many times over the years since then -- it doesn't sound nearly as crazy to me any more ...
    Mulan likes this.
  9. 0
    Still sounds nuts to me.

    In the thirty years since that remark was made, there are still far more women than men in this profession. And I think the men here aren't in it for corporate bucks (they're in the wrong place if they are), they actually 'get it' to some extent.

    If you want cushy corporate, there are MBA programs for that. Certainly not nursing.
  10. 0
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    for some reason, i'm not allowed to post a reply to the glass escalator thread, the gist of which is that white males are given preference over females and persons of other races, so i'll put it here:

    a decade or so ago, my dear husband and i, both nurses, took a travel assignment and moved to a new city. within days, i decided that i really wanted to work at the big city hospital where the sickest patients were sent. i put together an polished an impressive resume and the perfect cover letter and went off to apply to the icu at big city hospital. i interviewed and was hired, to start at a date two months in the future when our travel contract was completed. dh waited until the travel contract was completed, then decided he'd like to work in the icu at big city hospital also. he called up, spoke to the manager and went in for an interview the next day. he was also hired, to start the same day as me.

    i had five years more nursing experience than dh, i had experience with the same patient population as the icu at big city hospital, and i had a bsn and a master's to dh's adn. we were hired at the same salary. from the first, i was involved in education and special projects based on the work i had done in my previous position. dh worked his 12 hours and went home. as we came off orientation and seniority became important, i noticed that dh was listed as senior to me on the seniority list. both the assistant manager and the manager were dumbfounded when i asked why. we started on the same date, but i was hired first.

    the career ladder in the icu at bch was well-documented. in order to advance from rni to rnii, one had to work in the unit for a year, complete a project, join and become active in a committee and attend two seminars on your own time. i completed the project, joined and became co-chair of a committee and attended the seminars. yet at my yearly evaluation, i was not given the advancement to rnii or the 5% raise that came with it. i was told to "keep on doing what you're doing and we'll see next year." dh was given the advancement and the 5% raise even though the only one of the objectives he had completed was working on the unit for a year. he hadn't started a project, joined a committee or signed up for the seminars. it wasn't that i had screwed up or gotten into trouble, although dh was written up twice.

    about a year and a half later, i was given the advancement i had earned and the raise. by this time, dh had had three subsequent raises, each based on a percentage of his (now higher) salary. ten years passed. by now, he is making more than a dollar an hour more than me . . . and i still have more education, more experience and am more involved in unit projects. in frustration, i asked him what i was doing wrong. "you're not a white male," he said.

    so there you have it. the glass escalator is alive and well at big city hospital.
    I made CNII at my civilian facility in a year. I think there was more there than what mgt was telling you. (And I am not accusing YOU of holding out on us, I'm accusing management of being sexist, and they would've heard about it from me.) I think back then they may have been AAing him a bit for kudos points from somewhere. JMHO.

    In short, you got screwed.

    And this is a purely personal view, but if MY DH had the nerve to say that to me, he'd be sleeping outside. I'm serious. I'd also tell that facility to shove it sideways. If you've been there that long, you're viewed as a pushover and as complacent, someone who doesn't rock the boat but puts out more than maximum effort for the minimum amount of compensation.

    They LOVE you.


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