Future of Nursing In United States - Leading Change/Advancing Health

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    A consensus report by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Initiative on the Future of Nursing, lays out the case for nurses having an increased roles. Report goes on to list the many reasons why professional nurses are under used, including various state laws that hinder practice.

    The Future of Nursing: Leading Change, Advancing Health - Institute of Medicine

    http://www.modernhealthcare.com/arti...WS/310059975/0
    mmm333 and SharonH, RN like this.
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    It's perfectly fine with me if nurses have an increased role in healthcare, but only if employers are willing to increase the compensation for these extra duties (read: higher pay). I wouldn't even think of doing more work for free.
    GM2RN, mskate, DizzyLizzyNurse, and 3 others like this.
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    initiative on the future of nursing

    the initiative on the future of nursing is a two-year effort of the iom and rwjf to find solutions to the continuing challenges facing the nursing profession, and to build upon nursing-based solutions to improve quality and transform the way americans receive health care


     
    with more than 3 million members, the nursing profession is the largest segment of the nation’s health care workforce. working on the front lines of patient care, nurses can play a vital role in helping realize the objectives set forth in the 2010 affordable care act, legislation that represents the broadest health care overhaul since the 1965 creation of the medicare and medicaid programs. a number of barriers prevent nurses from being able to respond effectively to rapidly changing health care settings and an evolving health care system. these barriers need to be overcome to ensure that nurses are well-positioned to lead change and advance health.

    in 2008, the robert wood johnson foundation (rwjf) and the iom launched a two-year initiative to respond to the need to assess and transform the nursing profession. the iom appointed the committee on the rwjf initiative on the future of nursing, at the iom, with the purpose of producing a report that would make recommendations for an action-oriented blueprint for the future of nursing.

    nurses practice in many settings, including hospitals, schools, homes, retail health clinics, long-term care facilities, battlefields, and community and public health centers. they have varying levels of education and competencies—from licensed practical nurses, who greatly contribute to direct patient care in nursing homes, to nurse scientists, who research and evaluate more effective ways of caring for patients and promoting health. the committee considered nurses across roles, settings, and education levels in its effort to envision the future of the profession.

    through its deliberations, the committee developed four key messages that structure the recommendations presented in this report:
    • <li class=first jquery1286355391580="14">nurses should practice to the full extent of their education and training.
    • nurses should achieve higher levels of education and training through an improved education system that promotes seamless academic progression.
    • nurses should be full partners, with physicians and other health care professionals, in redesigning health care in the united states.
    • effective workforce planning and policy making require better data collection and information infrastructure.
    read the brief report

    full report: the future of nursing: leading change, advancing health (2010)
    lindarn and SharonH, RN like this.
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    From the Wall Street Journal

    The comments from physicians on this link are beyond ridiculous and pompous. What a bunch of uninformed babies!
    lindarn likes this.
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    Quote from kdrose01
    from the wall street journal

    the comments from physicians on this link are beyond ridiculous and pompous. what a bunch of uninformed babies!
    guess you mean something like this:

    • <li class=poststamp>12:39 pm october 6, 2010
    • [color=#333333]doctor zhivago wrote:
    these paraprofessionals are nice and sweet to patients, but lack in judgment, wisdom, and skills of the physical exam and what the signs and symptoms mean.
    i though that the iom report was going to comment on the poorly usable ehrs and cpoes that nurses now nurse as another patient, detracting from their time with the real patient.
    doctors have abdicated their responsibilities and have promoted the nps and pas by paying them ridiculous salaries to charade with white coats, to enter cut and paste progress notes, and to click in orders on the high risk cpoe systems (the clinical decision support and unproven pre fabbed order sets enable an illusion of safety).
    doctors should fire all of their pas and nps and get real.
    roseynurse345, kdrose01, and lindarn like this.
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    Sounded more like whiney medical students who have NO IDEA what they're in for. I know that in 10 years they'll be grateful for all the help they can get.
    mmm333, happy2learn, and lindarn like this.
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    Exactly, DoGood! Except I'm not certain Dr. Zhivago's even a physician, since he never claims he is. The others sound ridiculous too, except for, I believe, JIC. Sounds more like they're scared their jobs will disappear, but I think that's unlikely, especially considering that most of them want to be specialists anyway.
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    Quote from kdrose01
    From the Wall Street Journal

    The comments from physicians on this link are beyond ridiculous and pompous. What a bunch of uninformed babies!
    Frankly, "uninformed" is a colossal understatement, and far too diplomatic a term to boot. In light of the several studies conducted over the past few decades -- including research published in The New England Journal of Medicine -- that have shown time and time again that NPs are capable of delivering safe, high-quality patient care comparable to that of physicians within their mid-level scope of practice, I think "ignorant" and "clueless" are much more appropriate adjectives! This becomes all the more true when you consider that these people obviously have no idea that very few med school grads want to go into primary care these days since it pays much less than most other specialties, leaving a gaping hole in our nation's health-care system that someone will inevitably have to fill since today's neophyte physicians can't be bothered to do so.

    Don't waste your time or energy being offended by the remarks of these know-nothings. Arrogance and denigration of others are invariably the surest signs of insecurity, so you may be assured that such remarks are coming from cowards. If they want to make fools of themselves in public by demonstrating their cowardice and insecurity (not to mention their appalling ignorance) through such comments, that's their prerogative. Fools are never worthy of anger; they merely deserve to be laughed at.
    fromtheseaRN, subee, lindarn, and 1 other like this.
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    Quote from dogoodthengo
    guess you mean something like this:

    • <li class=poststamp>12:39 pm october 6, 2010
    • [color=#333333]doctor zhivago wrote:
    these paraprofessionals are nice and sweet to patients, but lack in judgment, wisdom, and skills of the physical exam and what the signs and symptoms mean.
    i though that the iom report was going to comment on the poorly usable ehrs and cpoes that nurses now nurse as another patient, detracting from their time with the real patient.
    doctors have abdicated their responsibilities and have promoted the nps and pas by paying them ridiculous salaries to charade with white coats, to enter cut and paste progress notes, and to click in orders on the high risk cpoe systems (the clinical decision support and unproven pre fabbed order sets enable an illusion of safety).
    doctors should fire all of their pas and nps and get real.
    english translation:

    nurses learn your place. get back into white uniforms and caps,and cease trying to play "doctor. also leave the white coats those those whom have actually earned the right to wear them. :d:d

    dr. zhivago sounds like another imort to the shores of the united states with very odd ideas about women and their roles in society. probably where he is from nurses still simper around in strange costumes and don't open their mouths except to say "yes, doctor' and "no, doctor".


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