Florida panel sets degree quotas, including nursing - page 2

The board that oversees Florida's public universities wants to churn out more nurses, teachers and engineers, increasing substantially the number of degrees awarded in those fields by the 2012-13... Read More

  1. by   UnewmeB4
    Quote from CHATSDALE
    the weeding out serves a function but my hearts go out to those who are left behind..there should be a process before enrollment to determine which may stay the distance...these people spend money and take up space which could be allocated to a potential graduate
    the ones who are weeded out still have to pay back the loans and the [or their parents] are out money they paid up front
    this is a bad situation for the schools and for the students who did not get into a program b/c it was full and for the dropouts who are left with a dibt and feeling of worthlessness
    Excellent point! That has been my complaint frequently. Because the training is so different today, I always recommend that someone who thinks they are interested, work as a Nurses Aide first, to see how a hospital functions, to see if it is anything like you thought. Even in the ADN program, there is a year of prequisites that can be quite costly if you get to clinicals and can't stand it.
  2. by   menetopali
    i agree that the attrition rate of experienced nurses contributes significantly to the overall shortage. i was trying to address the FLA action as it relates to education.
  3. by   BeachNurse
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    Money is a part of the reason they can't attract enough instructors. But it's not the ONLY reason. It's also about how nurses in general are perceived and treated.....and nursing instructors are not different in this area. They often not treated so well.
    I am in Florida. Several months ago I got an letter from one of the local universities looking to hire instructors. The salary started in the low 30's to low 40's...and that is supposed to attract us??????????
  4. by   kleinbbc
    Don't apply at PHCC. The school goes through part time instructors every semester.
  5. by   jasonglh
    Quote from BeachNurse
    I am in Florida. Several months ago I got an letter from one of the local universities looking to hire instructors. The salary started in the low 30's to low 40's...and that is supposed to attract us??????????

    What do you think a new teacher earns?

    I can see why you would not want to be an instructor. You have to get your Masters and there are other things you can do with that to make more money.

    The ADN program I am in requires you to get your CNA first. That weeds out a few right there. Theres no point in letting you go through the program if they dont think you can pass the NCLEX. I think several of those that started my class needed to be weeded out and should not have been allowed to start in the first place. The word oxygen thief comes to mind.

    I read the posts on this board and have a hard time understanding the view points of some. I suppose KY is just a different world but we dont have giant corporate hospitals trying to screw over the employees or nursing unions here.
  6. by   nyforlove
    I am floored by the high attrition rate of students....It's so competitive to get in, anyone who makes it should be qualified and determined to see it to the end....I'm here in the Big Apple and am still trying to get into an Accelerated BSN program--I guess that's even more competitive....

    Quote from jasonglh
    What do you think a new teacher earns?

    I can see why you would not want to be an instructor. You have to get your Masters and there are other things you can do with that to make more money.

    The ADN program I am in requires you to get your CNA first. That weeds out a few right there. Theres no point in letting you go through the program if they dont think you can pass the NCLEX. I think several of those that started my class needed to be weeded out and should not have been allowed to start in the first place. The word oxygen thief comes to mind.

    I read the posts on this board and have a hard time understanding the view points of some. I suppose KY is just a different world but we dont have giant corporate hospitals trying to screw over the employees or nursing unions here.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from nyforlove
    I am floored by the high attrition rate of students....It's so competitive to get in, anyone who makes it should be qualified and determined to see it to the end....I'm here in the Big Apple and am still trying to get into an Accelerated BSN program--I guess that's even more competitive....
    I don't think it's necessarily bad. The ones washed out often NEED TO BE-----most would not make good nurses. Some of the ones having difficulties academically, I feel badly for, cause they still would make good nurses. However, they were in the minority----- the majority who washed out in my program (and we lost well over 1/2) needed to go----it was not academics alone bringing them down.
  8. by   Candidnt
    I'm a BSN grad; where I went to college, the weed out process took place in lower division, where what you did were mostly prereqs, etc, and your two basic nursing courses. If you made it past that point, they told you that it was their job to do everything reasonably within their power (though naturally, you still had to do the work) to help you succeed. After all, if you looked good, they looked good. My classes' NCLEX pass rate was 98%. I think there were like 82 of us, I'd have to go back and count. Only two dropped out, one to have a baby (her hubby was away in the military) but both came back and graduated with the next class. One actually had a kid during the program, and stayed in. but anyway, they didn't have a wait list; in fact, I got in a year sooner than I planned.

    Now this whole degree quota thing...I don't understand...I know Florida is hard pressed for nurses, but to drive people into nursing just to meet a quota doesn't seem right...it's not just a matter of following a program of study, it's all about aptitude, interest, etc...not to mention free will. Now to promote nursing as a career for others, and to invest in programs to do that, is one thing...but I don't think admissions offices/administrations should be squeezing people in or out of majors.
    Last edit by Candidnt on Apr 21, '05 : Reason: left out a detail
  9. by   ARNPsomeday
    Quote from RN4NICU
    ...Yes, that is our answer to the nursing shortage - keep churning out flocks of new grads every year so we can keep nursing wages in the area nice and low. If a nurse doesn't like not getting competitive wages and raises, let her walk - there will be all sorts of new grads to take her place :angryfire
    RN4NICU, I hope you are mistaken. In the community college I attend, 1/4 of any given accelerated class will drop out. The reasons that I heard: stress or an unexpected family problem that required leaving school for paid work. In the regular two-year program, reasons are mainly: insufficient discipline (failing) and the realization that Nursing requires a desire or vocation.

    Those who try to become RNs for job security, money and a mistaken image of what nursing is usually don't graduate. Those who graduate are increasingly mature folks such as myself who have previous careers (to fall back on!) and will not accept entry-level, rock-bottom wages longer than absolutely necessary. I don't think they will ever churn out enough new graduates to let good, experienced nurses walk, as schools do not pay instructors enough. I don't see "enough" students graduating and passing boards. Does anyone have any figures?
  10. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from ARNPsomeday
    RN4NICU, I hope you are mistaken.
    Hate to tell you, but it happens every day. Some places are better than others, but if you read enough of the posts on these boards, you will see that I am right.
  11. by   leslie :-D
    when i was in nsg school, we lost 2/3 of our class by the time we graduated. so quit- most of our nsg instructors were egotistical powermongers that taught through intimidation and thrived in seeing a student shake in their boots....then there were many students w/a communication barrier and flunked out. and yes, there were some who passed that i would never want for my nurse. yet still, 67% attrition?

    and it's true- they have no problem (in areas) doing their damndest to attract new grads (much less $$) but do little or nothing to retain the pros. talk about feeling devalued.

    and to offer an instructor 30-40K??????? that is the ultimate slap in the face.
  12. by   RN4NICU
    Quote from earle58
    and to offer an instructor 30-40K??????? that is the ultimate slap in the face.
    Obviously they are trying to attract the best people they can find to teach tomorrow's nurses.
  13. by   UM Review RN
    I always thought it was a little weird that all the nursing courses got intense and extremely difficult the day after the date passed for a refund on the course. The school keeps the money; the instructor has a manageable load.

    Hmmmm....

    But then, I'm a tad jaded on the whole educational system anyhow.

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