Exploitation of the elderly

  1. 1
    Yet another member of our society with poor ethics.http://mobile.oregonlive.com/advorg/...tguid=V5hCsT6y
    lindarn likes this.
  2. 12 Comments so far...

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  4. 4
    This story makes me want to cringe. The elderly victim was cognizant enough about what had been done to him to the point that he felt humiliation when facility administrators told him he'd been photographed without consent while defecating. This was one of his final memories before he departed this earth.

    I get the feeling that she's not truly remorseful for her wrongdoings. Rather, she's feeling terrible for having been caught.
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Mar 8, '12
    KeyMaster, lindarn, dudette10, and 1 other like this.
  5. 4
    TheCommuter nailed it.

    There are no words adequate to describe such a soulless individual. I'm glad she did get caught.
    KeyMaster, lindarn, DixieRedHead, and 1 other like this.
  6. 2
    This same facility some years back also had a CNA that was caught on video (planted by family members in the pts rm) sexually assaulting a pt. I feel so bad for anyone having to be in a LTC in this town, these facilities are crapholes (learned from personal experience).
    lindarn and Not_A_Hat_Person like this.
  7. 3
    Nursing homes, LTC, etc... known this for years and fail to address the problem; you get the quality of CNAs the facility is willing to pay for, and sadly at the wages offered by some the job only attracts those whom would be unemployed.

    There are some great nursing assistants out there, who day in and out do their best for patients and staff, others quite frankly should be lined up and shot. *LOL*

    It is so sad that some of our seniors having lived such long and wonderful lives have to spend their final years being violated and degraded by those paid to take care of them.

    Numerous studies have shown constant staff turn over in nursing homes/LTC has an adverse affect on patients.

    Sad as these stories that make the news are, statistically they are only the tip of the iceberg. So much goes on that is unreported, or the CNA is allowed to resign/quit, or not even uncovered/known about that it makes one want to sit down and weep.
  8. 2
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    you get the quality of CNAs the facility is willing to pay for, and sadly at the wages offered by some the job only attracts those whom would be unemployed.
    I work for a large corporation that operates multiple hospitals, rehab centers, and LTC facilities. The local pay grid for CNAs at their LTC facilities is a whopping $9.50 per hour, which is low for the major metropolitan area where I live.
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Numerous studies have shown constant staff turn over in nursing homes/LTC has an adverse affect on patients.
    I once read a statistic that nursing homes have annual employee turnover rates that exceed 100 percent. If this is true, then the turnover rates are similar to what one would find at any local McDonald's fast food joint.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and lindarn like this.
  9. 1
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I work for a large corporation that operates multiple hospitals, rehab centers, and LTC facilities. The local pay grid for CNAs at their LTC facilities is a whopping $9.50 per hour, which is low for the major metropolitan area where I live.
    I once read a statistic that nursing homes have annual employee turnover rates that exceed 100 percent. If this is true, then the turnover rates are similar to what one would find at any local McDonald's fast food joint.
    From what one has heard wages in the NYC area aren't that much better, they range from $9 to perhaps about $12 per hour, but in any case none really pay anything near the true cost of living in this very expensive city. With their new contract hotel housekeeping staff (maids) will make $60K within five years and they have free healthcare.

    From Salary.com: Salary.com Salary Wizard- Do you know what you're worth?
    lindarn likes this.
  10. 2
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Nursing homes, LTC, etc... known this for years and fail to address the problem; you get the quality of CNAs the facility is willing to pay for, and sadly at the wages offered by some the job only attracts those whom would be unemployed.

    There are some great nursing assistants out there, who day in and out do their best for patients and staff, others quite frankly should be lined up and shot. *LOL*

    It is so sad that some of our seniors having lived such long and wonderful lives have to spend their final years being violated and degraded by those paid to take care of them.

    Numerous studies have shown constant staff turn over in nursing homes/LTC has an adverse affect on patients.

    Sad as these stories that make the news are, statistically they are only the tip of the iceberg. So much goes on that is unreported, or the CNA is allowed to resign/quit, or not even uncovered/known about that it makes one want to sit down and weep.
    The sad reality is that life in a nursing home is likely to be the future for those of us who are "lucky" enough to reach the age of 85. Nearly 60% of those who are 85 or older will spend some time time in a nursing home - the vast majority of those with longer stays (six-plus months) will never the facility.

    I have a copy of Ulrich Inderbinen's obituary pinned up on my office wall for inspiration. While Mr Inderbinen was rather old (103) and led an interesting and vigorous life, all of which may be seen in the NYTimes obituary posted below, that is not the reason I admire him so much. This is: His family reported that he died gently in his own bed, in the house that he built with his own hands and lived his whole life in.

    We can only pray that we'll be half as lucky in old age as he was.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/17/us...d=print&src=pm
    Ulrich Inderbinen, 103, Guide In the Alps for Seven Decades
    Published: June 17, 2004

    Ulrich Inderbinen, a Swiss mountain guide who made his last ascent of the Matterhorn at 90, died on Monday in Zermatt. He was 103.

    Called King of the Alps by admiring foreign tourists, Mr. Inderbinen died in his sleep at home, according to a family announcement in the daily newspaper Walliser Bote of Brig.

    Mr. Inderbinen stopped work only at the age of 95. Even in his 90's, he regularly climbed peaks of more than 13,200 feet, and estimated that he had stood on the summit of the Matterhorn, which he called ''the most beautiful mountain in the world,'' at least 370 times. ''I have never felt bored,'' he once said in an interview with The Associated Press. ''That is, unless my clients walk too slowly.''

    Mr. Inderbinen was born into a family of nine children on Dec. 3, 1900, and spent most of his childhood tending animals in the mountains above Zermatt, which was still an impoverished farming community rather than a top international resort.


    He made his first ascent of the 14,700-foot Matterhorn in September 1921 with his younger sister, who wore the traditional long skirt and nailed boots. He got his first job as a mountain guide four years later.
    ''Mr. Inderbinen showed himself thoroughly safe and reliable, so I hope to climb with him more frequently,'' wrote his first customer, a German doctor, in comments that were subsequently echoed by hundreds of other climbers.

    In his 70-year career Mr. Inderbinen took time off only once, when he was grounded for 10 days with a shoulder injury after slipping on an icy path. He had his first dental appointment when he was 74. He never needed glasses.

    Mr. Inderbinen once said that one of the best periods of his life came after his 80th birthday, when he started competing in skiing races for fun. He always won, as he was the only competitor in his age category.

    He was given a pair of skis for his 90th birthday, a gift he put to regular use, and a mountain-climbing ice ax when he turned 95.

    Despite his international reputation, Mr. Inderbinen remained modest. Foreign television crews wanting to interview him found he was a man of few words. He rarely took vacations and never saw the sea. He never owned a car or bicycle. ''I am the only person in Zermatt without a telephone,'' he would say, proudly. Clients wanting to make contact with him knew they could meet him in Zermatt's church square in the early evening.

    He remained under the spell of the Matterhorn, Switzerland's most famous landmark. ''It's simply a fascinating mountain,'' he said, ''which was as appealing to me on my last climb as it was on my first.''

    If anyone asked him of any regrets, he would reply that his family vetoed his plans to visit Tanzania and climb Kilimanjaro at 92. ''I've really no idea why they were all against it,'' he said.

    He was once asked by a journalist if he was afraid of dying. ''Not really,'' he replied. ''When I look at the death notices in the paper I scarcely see anyone of my own age.''
    Last edit by chuckster on Mar 14, '12 : Reason: typo
    lindarn and leslie :-D like this.
  11. 1
    What a sick piece of work.

    And again, why does everyone want to live "as long as they possibly can".
    lindarn likes this.


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