Er Goes Self Service!!!

  1. Interesting concept....



    DALLAS - An emergency room might be the last place you’d think would have do-it-yourself check-in.

    But Parkland Memorial Hospital has three self-service computer kiosks, similar to those used by airport passengers and hotel guests. And so do a handful of other hospital ERs, where the long wait in line to register and explain symptoms can be grueling.


    Rest of the Article here:

    Chest pain? Click here. ER goes self-service
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20761116/
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Sep 15, '07 : Reason: added article title
    •  
  2. 12 Comments

  3. by   sunnyjohn
    I used to train at Parkland... Been in that ER MANY times.

    If it cuts down on the wait and helps them see people faster, good for them! :tup:
  4. by   rnmomtobe2010
    If it shortening the check-in time, what about the wait to see the doctor? Let me know when I don't have to wait what seems like forever to see the doc.. Where I am from, my family has to be really, really sick to make the 45 minute trip to the nearest hospital and then wait 2 hrs. sometimes. Sounds like a good idea though.
  5. by   coolpeach
    2 hours lol......

    I have talked to several nurses who work at parkland. I am told it is not unusual to wait 24 hours for triage, and 48 hours to been seen by a doctor.

    I think the main problem is that it is listed as a county hospital. I have asked tons of people, and they think that means free. They do not realize that you have to apply for free or discounted help, and can do that at many other hospitals also. I can't imagine being sick and having to wait sitting in a crowded, uncomfortable Er for 48 hours. It makes me think of a third world country.
  6. by   PeachPie
    Why am I predicting people "cheating" and cutting in line by punching in symptoms like coughing up blood or abdominal pains at 10 pain?
  7. by   teeituptom
    I like it

    now just have them with an attached menu for drug treatment options you might like.

    Select you treament option

    out in your Visa or Mastercard and bingo your done

    sounds like heaven
  8. by   BabyRN2Be
    Quote from teeituptom
    I like it

    now just have them with an attached menu for drug treatment options you might like.

    Select you treament option

    out in your Visa or Mastercard and bingo your done

    sounds like heaven
    Tom's on the right track here.

    When I first saw the headline, I was thinking along the lines of someone finally put in a vending machine in the waiting room which contained Vicodin, Xanax, and work releases.

    I think they may have taken care of a very small problem, a part of the wait that usually doesn't take much time at all. Someone is not seeing the forest through the trees here.
  9. by   Mayflye
    ... someone finally put in a vending machine in the waiting room which contained Vicodin, Xanax, and work releases.

    Hilarious! And how about an ATM so they can pay their damn bill!
  10. by   mianders
    I was an ER nurse for 12 years, and the thing that concerns me about self check-in is the potential for a bad patient not being recognized. One of the things about the patient going to the desk to check out is it gives the nurse an oppurtunity to see "every" patient that comes through the door. It is the responsibility of the triage nurse to triage the patient not a name on a computer. I see the potential for a sentinal event with this type of check-in.
  11. by   Altra
    " ...patients spend about eight minutes at the kiosks, using touchscreens to enter their name, age, and other personal information. the computer shows the patient a list of ailments to choose from, like "pain" or "fever and/or chills" and a list of body parts to indicate where it hurts..."

    wondering how this jibes with the standard of care for chest pain patients ... door to ekg < 10minutes, or possible stroke patients, door to ct scan < 10 minutes.
  12. by   sjt9721
    As a nurse who worked in the Parkland ED just a few years ago, I can see some benefit to the kiosks.

    It was not unusual to have 10-20 people show up at one time to get checked in. (Thank you, DART!) The Triage Charge Nurse enters each person into the system (name, DOB, c/c, maybe VS) and gives them an initial acuity. Then the other Triage Nurses (usually 1-2 others) call the people (from a list of 10-40 that are waiting) into the triage area for their official triage.

    It's impossible as Triage Charge to see every person as they walk through the door. The kiosks (in my understanding) get the "check-in" process done so the patient shows up in the system for one of the Triage Nurses.

    This would be nice because as my Charge is wading through checking in 20 stubbed toes & sore throats, the febrile abdominal pain would pop-up on the screen. Obviously, we all know who I would call first!

    I realize that the info is only as good as what the patient inputs into the system. But this is true for any nurse-patient interaction. Someone mentioned patients "cheating"...well, they can cheat in a face-to-face interaction just as easily. Coughing up blood, chest pain, bloody stools...I know you believe them when they state these complaints in person.

    I always think of the man that came in c/o "they robbed me". He admitted to some RUQ pain but only wanted to talk about how they robbed him & took his wallet. I kept asking about his pain (what happened? rate the pain? describe it?)...and finally he says "Well, they shot me!" And sure enough...2 bullet holes in the RUQ. I don't know about you, but my first words would be "I'VE BEEN SHOT".

    As to the post regarding 24-hour triage times and 48-hour treatment times...that seems a little excessive. I doubt that things have gone that downhill in the last few years. When I was there (135,000-150,000 annual visits), those times were more like door-to-discharge times.

    Anyway, it's new technology. There are pros and cons, and certainly processes to be refined and worked out. I'd like to give it a chance before automatically discounting it.

    And as far as the kiosks that Tom mentioned...I recommend we just spray aerosolized Ativan in the waiting rooms.
    Last edit by sjt9721 on Sep 17, '07
  13. by   Spritenurse1210
    I think that would be helpful for non-emergent patients. could get traffic flowing easier
  14. by   jmtndl
    Quote from coolpeach
    2 hours lol......

    I have talked to several nurses who work at parkland. I am told it is not unusual to wait 24 hours for triage, and 48 hours to been seen by a doctor.

    I think the main problem is that it is listed as a county hospital. I have asked tons of people, and they think that means free. They do not realize that you have to apply for free or discounted help, and can do that at many other hospitals also. I can't imagine being sick and having to wait sitting in a crowded, uncomfortable Er for 48 hours. It makes me think of a third world country.
    I used to work at Parkland. One night a co-worker and I were in the elevator and a patient's IV machine fell and hit her in the head.One pupil blew up and I insisted that she go to the ER. I escorted her there but had to go back to work. This was about 8pm. When I got back to work the next day at 3pm, she was still in the ER waiting to see another doc. This was an employee with an on the job injury!!!Anything to improve service like that is worth looking into.

close