Doctors rip VA plan that would give some nurses more authority - page 2

A proposed rule by the Department of Veterans Affairs, which would dramatically expand the authority of nurses to treat patients without a doctor's supervision, is drawing attention to a bitter... Read More

  1. by   Susie2310
    There is no comparison between the education and training that a physician undergoes versus the education/training a Nurse Practitioner/Advanced Practice Nurse receives. Anyone who is in doubt of this need only research the differences in physician education/training and NP/APN education/training. I support the AMA's position 100%. In my state the state Board of Registered Nursing (BORN) refused to allow Nurse Practitioners to practice independently as this would amount to practicing medicine. I completely support the physicians who are opposing this plan; veterans deserve to be diagnosed and treated by physicians at all levels of their care. I am an RN and I completely disagree with this plan on the grounds of quality of patient care.
    Last edit by Susie2310 on Jun 6, '16
  2. by   Lisa.fnp
    Quote from Susie2310
    There is no comparison between the education and training that a physician undergoes versus the education/training a Nurse Practitioner/Advanced Practice Nurse receives. Anyone who is in doubt of this need only research the differences in physician education/training and NP/APN education/training. I support the AMA's position 100%. In my state the state Board of Registered Nursing (BORN) refused to allow Nurse Practitioners to practice independently as this would amount to practicing medicine. I completely support the physicians who are opposing this plan; veterans deserve to be diagnosed and treated by physicians at all levels of their care. I am an RN and I completely disagree with this plan on the grounds of quality of patient care.
    Your right, no comparison. What can be compared or measured is the results of primary health care between the two. Case study after case studies has shown. Results are on par between the two.
    Supporting the AMA 100% Is dangerous because it supports a monopolistic organization that at rare times has failed the pubic. The Federal Trade Commission in April 2015 shared a report supporting the breakup of the Monopoly powers it exerts. The AMA has many times shown a greater interest with the business of pharmaceutical companies then the public. It has at times been slow to make needed changes and governs the publics best interest. All organizations should be questioned and not blindly followed 100%.
    You where trained in nursing school not to follow blindly 100% a physicians orders. Your a advocate of your patients and the last line of defense to protect them. In your education you earned that right. So if you wouldn't follow a physicians orders 100%. Why would one follow the AMA100%?
  3. by   NuGuyNurse2b
    Quote from Lisa.fnp
    You where trained in nursing school not to follow blindly 100% a physicians orders. Your a advocate of your patients and the last line of defense to protect them. In your education you earned that right. So if you wouldn't follow a physicians orders 100%. Why would one follow the AMA100%?
    that's specious reasoning at best. physicians orders don't always fit with a patient's ever changing condition - there are many variables involved in that very moment of patient care - those are situations that we can and should advocate against physician orders and protect the patients. the AMA's policies are strictly just that - policies. Those policies are put in place for the safety of the public, first and foremost. Yes, physicians do benefit, there are private interests in place, but that doesn't negate the policies in and of themselves. It's like sterile technique - it protects against infection but also saves the hospital money (infections, lawsuits, equipment, etc). You can't just pinpoint that it saves the hospital money, an added benefit of the policy, and say that the sterile technique itself is questionable.
  4. by   Psychcns
    APRNs have proven their safety and competence over the years and People not comfortable with APRNs should see MD's.
  5. by   CraigB-RN
    If Up-to-date is so perfect, then why bother going to either MD or NP school? Just Google it. I would rather an explication with reasons than a "That's what Up-to-date Said" And this goes from NP, Intern, Resident etc.

    I would also bet that the NP was using hospital subscription, not a person subscription.
  6. by   dudette10
    Quote from CraigB-RN
    If Up-to-date is so perfect, then why bother going to either MD or NP school? Just Google it. I would rather an explication with reasons than a "That's what Up-to-date Said" And this goes from NP, Intern, Resident etc.

    I would also bet that the NP was using hospital subscription, not a person subscription.
    Nailed it.

    And yes, it was a hospital subscription.
  7. by   renardeau
    Does anyone know the status of the actual rule? Forgive me for being somewhat naive when it comes to these things, but it's a 'proposed rule', right? It seems like the government was taking comments until July 25th, but what is the status of this proposed legislation now?
  8. by   BostonFNP
    Quote from CraigB-RN
    If Up-to-date is so perfect, then why bother going to either MD or NP school? Just Google it. I would rather an explication with reasons than a "That's what Up-to-date Said" And this goes from NP, Intern, Resident etc.

    I would also bet that the NP was using hospital subscription, not a person subscription.
    UptoDate is a fantastic POCDMT, I use it frequently. I think anyone that has spent even an hour in the provider role would tell you that there is a big difference between EBM and textbook knowledge and clinical practice. I tell my first semester NP students that one you step into active practice nothing is ever going to be black and white.

    And regarding the sliding-scale, there is a growing body of data that suggests perhaps we shouldn't put non-insulin-dependent diabetic on a sliding scale while in-patient. But that's a whole different discussion.

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