Doctors resign, No Confidence vote. Six Sigma. - page 2

Does anyone know what is happening at the Texas hospital?... Read More

  1. by   ebear
    Quote from 28wkpreemieRN
    My institution has been using 6 sigma for the past 5 years. Like I said then and I continue to say, you can not equate management of factories (ie: Motorola) to running a hospital. It is apples and oranges. The worse thing about 6 sigma is that with each implimentation of a project, there are always negative consequences. It is a threat heavy situation to problems. Moreso, input is not by the people who are affected by cutbacks and changes. You just do what they say or it is disciplinary action and threat of termination.:angryfire

    Corporate healthcare is KILLING us!!!!
    ebear:angryfire
  2. by   leslymill
    Quote from ebear
    Corporate healthcare is KILLING us!!!!
    ebear:angryfire
    No we are still alive. That was just our patient that died.
    Just as in Corporations and Militaristic minded people think that mass death is a small price for our freedom. Freedom to be rich and abusive, but not American.:trout:
    Last edit by leslymill on Oct 2, '07
  3. by   OC_An Khe
    Another effective tool (sigma six) being used in the wrong manner. Sigma six is about processes that can be quantified and timed effectively. Direct patient care is very difficult, if not immpossible to quantify, let alone have time parameters. A little knowledge is indeed a dangerous thing.
  4. by   pickledpepperRN
    Our job as direct care registered nurses is the nursing process including patient advocacy.

    The article told of standardizing the procedure for either inserting or maintaining Foley catheters. The infection rate decreased. that is good.

    What concerns me is that so many hospitals spend millions on consultants when assigning fewer patients per nurse would cost less and improve outcomes.
  5. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from spacenurse
    The article told of standardizing the procedure for either inserting or maintaining Foley catheters. The infection rate decreased. that is good.

    What concerns me is that so many hospitals spend millions on consultants when assigning fewer patients per nurse would cost less and improve outcomes.
    I agree. Also, enough with the gimmicky-cheesy crap i.e. "black-belts" and "green-belts" etc.
  6. by   ebear
    leslymill,
    What are nurses--just "collateral damage?"
    ebear
  7. by   leslymill
    Quote from multicollinearity
    Did you read the article? It would appear that in this instance, with this hospital, Six Sigma did good things. It was a method of improving their processes for better outcomes. Nursing turn-over decreased after implementing Six Sigma. In other words, nurses must have liked what happened because nursing retention went up.

    Now all of that said - I remain skeptical about how individual hospitals may choose to implement this and the eventual results. It's safe to say that the hospital in this thread's OP was doing a poor job.

    Also, I think it's easy to say "patients first profits last" but the real world puts a stop to that. Hospitals may only operate in the red for so long before they close. I agree that profits don't need to be obscene - but finances do dictate and determine a hospital's existence.
    That Hospital is run by the Sisters of Charity....they invented hospitals lol, and are religious. They are non-profit and strive for good business practices.

    I think businessmen and CEO's getting billions of dollars off of health care will love this for the wrong reason. We just have to be vigilant and stand up for good practices.
  8. by   Multicollinearity
    Quote from leslymill
    That Hospital is run by the Sisters of Charity....they invented hospitals lol, and are religious. They are non-profit and strive for good business practices.

    I think businessmen and CEO's getting billions of dollars off of health care will love this for the wrong reason. We just have to be vigilant and stand up for good practices.
    I'm not advocating for Six Sigma, and I'm not fighting it. I don't have anything invested in its use. I'm just looking at information. I have to wonder if it's simply a vehicle whereby good hospitals improve their processes and bad hospitals cut $$$? I honestly don't know.

    I do wonder if the new medicare rules about not paying for nosocomial infections and other so-called preventible complications are behind the new push for Six Sigma. Six Sigma is supposed to be about cutting "defects" or errors.
    Last edit by Multicollinearity on Oct 3, '07
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    Protesting nurses
    Group says they face staff shortages, ‘unfair’ employee evaluations

    HARLINGEN — Carrying signs that said “Spend your money on patient care, nurses and supplies” and “Put the Baptist back in Valley Baptist,” a small but vocal group of nurses, staff and community members assembled Monday at McKelvey Park to express their concerns about Valley Baptist Health System.

    “We’re trying to (create) awareness of what’s going on,” said Lynn Rox, a pediatric nurse at Valley Baptist Medical Center-Harlingen. “Nurses need to understand if they cannot advocate for themselves and safe practice, how can they pretend to advocate for patients?” ...

    http://www.valleymorningstar.com/art...ey_nurses.html

    You Tube video: http://www.youtube.com/results?searc...&search=Search
  10. by   leslymill
    Quote from ebear
    leslymill,
    What are nurses--just "collateral damage?"
    ebear
    We suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    "So, you have to look at your lacking areas as defects by your employees. Home Depot attempted to solve this by thinning out their workforce and implementing training programs for the remaining employees in order to reduce defects. On paper, this may work well but once the human factor was applied it led to massive frustration from the employees and the customers due to the lack of salespeople on the floor at any one time. Although the employees were better trained, they were now required to help 22.8 customers per hour rather than the previous 13.4. Other retailers are learning from these mistakes of the first big box retailers to attempt this and are tweaking the methodology to better suit their company goals."



    The above from Wikipedia, said a lot to me. Sound a bit familiar? Scary.
  12. by   UM Review RN
    Quote from spacenurse
    What concerns me is that so many hospitals spend millions on consultants when assigning fewer patients per nurse would cost less and improve outcomes.

    Bingo!
  13. by   lionrn
    St. Joseph's success was the result of applying basic improvements nurses have suggested for years; any Six-Sigma involvement is misdirection.

    The New York Times article:

    http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpag...=&pagewanted=1

    implies that Six-Sigma turned SSM St. Joseph Health Center's no-growth, financial loss business into a pro-growth, financially healthier business, with a reduction in staff turnover by 1/3 in two years.

    But isn't this exactly what one would expect with:

    1. Better protocols and procedures,
    2. Improved and universal training leading to more consistency in following those more robust procedures, and
    3. Improved and more appropriate staffing?

    Is St Joseph's improvement really a surprise?

    Haven't nurses been requesting all these things and promising they would bring great results for many years?

    This looks to me like more intelligent healthcare delivery, with more and better staffing, training, consistency, and understanding.

    Was it the Six-Sigma "big manufacturing business" model that achieved these results for St. Joseph?

    The article does not say so; it says instead:

    By using the quality and productivity techniques that helped strengthen American industry in the 1980's, the hospital has improved patient care and reduced medication errors, waiting time in the emergency room and infection rates. It has even sharply reduced nursing turnover, which prevents many hospitals from delivering consistent care.
    Any nurse could predict dramatically improved outcomes with those improvements, but such suggestions are institutionally ignored as too expensive.
    The St. Joseph's example shows otherwise.

close