Doctor's reinstatement irks operating room nurses - page 3

Three dozen operating room nurses and technicians at Tri-City Medical Center said a board decision last week to reinstate an orthopedic surgeon will create an uneasy working environment that could... Read More

  1. by   finchertwins
    You know I think instead of arguing with each other over this issue we should email our frustrations and concerns to the tri-city medical center. My only suggestion is to word them both professionaly and refrain from foul language. This is a way we can help support all those out there that have to fight this double standard.
  2. by   rsmith858
    As a nurse, I can honestly say that about 20% of us actually do a good job of taking care of our patients. It's not that those nurses are incompetent or unqualified, it's just that they can be lazy from time to time or get fed up with their patients' constant nagging. As nurses, though, we should hold ourselves to a higher standard of tolerance and effort.

    I've heard Dr. Tohidi is an perfectionist whose primary concern is the quality of patient care. He only reacts harshly to those nurses who don't do their job well. In this case in particular, the review committee found that there was no evidence that a threatening gesture was ever made with the scalpel. The nurse/accuser was a rookie who refused to pay attention to Dr. Tohidi's directions, rudely dismissing all of his directives. When it came time for surgery and the nurse was still way behind in his prep work, Dr. Tohidi became agitated and told him so. It just so happened that surgery was seconds from starting, and therefore Dr. Tohidi had a scalpel already in his hand. As soon as he realized the way it looked (with the scalpel there), he put the scalpel down. As a matter of fact, when asked afterwards if he would ever assist Dr. Tohidi again, that nurse said that he would.

    So please, don't make any judgments or form any opinions based on incomplete and incorrect information. I don't think that it is appropriate to ever yell or be rude to a coworker, but, barring complete a-holes (which Dr. Tohidi is not), the only time nurses are treated rudely is when we don't do our job the right way.
  3. by   NRSKarenRN
    Quote from rsmith858
    as a nurse, i can honestly say that about 20% of us actually do a good job of taking care of our patients. it's not that those nurses are incompetent or unqualified, it's just that they can be lazy from time to time or get fed up with their patients' constant nagging. as nurses, though, we should hold ourselves to a higher standard of tolerance and effort.
    if the 20% quote is true, i'd be on my way out the door of this unit.
  4. by   orrnlori
    Quote from rsmith858
    As a nurse, I can honestly say that about 20% of us actually do a good job of taking care of our patients. It's not that those nurses are incompetent or unqualified, it's just that they can be lazy from time to time or get fed up with their patients' constant nagging. As nurses, though, we should hold ourselves to a higher standard of tolerance and effort.

    I've heard Dr. Tohidi is an perfectionist whose primary concern is the quality of patient care. He only reacts harshly to those nurses who don't do their job well. In this case in particular, the review committee found that there was no evidence that a threatening gesture was ever made with the scalpel. The nurse/accuser was a rookie who refused to pay attention to Dr. Tohidi's directions, rudely dismissing all of his directives. When it came time for surgery and the nurse was still way behind in his prep work, Dr. Tohidi became agitated and told him so. It just so happened that surgery was seconds from starting, and therefore Dr. Tohidi had a scalpel already in his hand. As soon as he realized the way it looked (with the scalpel there), he put the scalpel down. As a matter of fact, when asked afterwards if he would ever assist Dr. Tohidi again, that nurse said that he would.

    So please, don't make any judgments or form any opinions based on incomplete and incorrect information. I don't think that it is appropriate to ever yell or be rude to a coworker, but, barring complete a-holes (which Dr. Tohidi is not), the only time nurses are treated rudely is when we don't do our job the right way.
    If you truly believe that only 20% of nurses do a good job of taking care of their patients, I would say you either don't know what you are talking about or you work in the worst health care facility in America.

    For anyone who has worked in an OR, we all know there are certain prima donna surgeons whose main concern is themselves first and the patient second (or even lower down the ladder). It's all about them and the OR is their stage; their claim to fame within the facility is their foul temperment and sour distorted personalities and attendant psychological disorders. As far as your statement that the only time we nurses are treated poorly is when we don't do our jobs, well, what planet are you from anyway? A foul mouthed surgeon once threw a stapler at me because it malfunctioned. It had nothing to do with how I was doing my job. I was new at the time and still quite green. If it ever happens again, I will bring charges in a heartbeat (and he knows that).

    PS - I would question whether you are a nurse or a troll. Your broad statements are quite questionable for a professional nurse.
  5. by   VickyRN
    as a nurse i can honestly say that about 20% of us actually do a good job of taking care of our patients. it's not that those nurses are incompetent or unqualified, it's just that they can be lazy from time to time or get fed up with their patients' constant nagging. as nurses though, we should hold ourselves to a higher standard of tolerance and effort.

    i've heard dr. tohidi is an perfectionist whose primary concern is the quality of patient care. he only reacts harshly to those nurses who don't do their job well. in this case in particular, the review committee found that there was no evidence that a threatening gesture was ever made with the scalpel. the nurse/accuser was a rookie who refused to pay attention to dr. tohidi's directions, rudely dismissing all of his directives. when it came time for surgery and the nurse was still way behind in his prep work, dr. tohidi became agitated and told him so. it just so happened that surgery was seconds from starting, and therefore dr. tohidi had a scalpel already in his hand. as soon as he realized the way it looked (with the scalpel there), he put the scalpel down. as a matter of fact, when asked afterwards if he would ever assist dr. tohidi again, that nurse said that he would.

    so please, don't make any judgments or form any opinions based on incomplete and incorrect information. i don't think that it is appropriate to ever yell or be rude to a coworker, but, barring complete a-holes (which dr. tohidi is not), the only time nurses are treated rudely is when we don't do our job the right way
    .

    veeerrry interesting, seeing the originator of that post (if you look at rsmith858's public profile) is a nursing student! i have to agree with orrnlori's assessment on this one.
  6. by   Farkinott
    rsmith858 please pass judgement when you are a nurse!
  7. by   rsmith858
    The label "student" was a mistake made when signing up, and I guess I exaggerate a little with the 20% figure. Either way, you would be kidding yourself if you didn't agree that there are a large number of nurses who don't do their job as well as they should.
  8. by   VickyRN
    Quote from rsmith858
    the label "student" was a mistake made when signing up, and i guess i exaggerate a little with the 20% figure. either way, you would be kidding yourself if you didn't agree that there are a large number of nurses who don't do their job as well as they should.
    regardless of poster rsmith858's status, the real issue is a hostile work environment for the nurses at this facility. 36 nurses are in agreement that this doctor is unsafe and abusive.

    to quote from the article:
    "patricia shiley, a registered nurse in the tri-city operating room, read a letter to tri-city directors during last week's board meeting that was signed by 36 of her co-workers. the letter berated the board for reinstating tohidi.

    the letter reads in part: "we have stated repeatedly that we feel unsafe. we feel distracted; we fear unpredictable behavior; we fear retaliation because we know it exists. this potentially can affect patient safety as we are not able to provide our patients with the level of care they deserve."

    shiley added that operating room employees have similar concerns with more than one surgeon who practices at tri-city.

    "we do not want the board to think this letter is only about this one physician," the letter states. "it is not. it is about an acceptance and tolerance of this kind of abusive behavior in the medical arena that would not be accepted anywhere else."
  9. by   hipab4hands
    Quote from PA-C in Texas
    That works both ways. On the medical side, nurses have a "rep" for being real b*****s, particularly toward each other.
    Yes, we do have that rep, but in actuality those nurses are few in numbers.

    My friend was talking with the Head of the Medicine Dept, when he became angry with her and shoved her. She immediately called the Police Dept and filed a battery complaint. In addition, she filed a Personal Injury lawsuit against him.

    So, guess where this guy works? Yup, he's still head of the department.

    My friend did win her Personal Injury suit against him, but the DA refused to file charges against him.

    Moral of the story-It's ok for Dr.'s to be physical abusive to staff according to the powers that be.
  10. by   stsdoc
    Quote from vickyrn
    regardless of poster rsmith858's status, the real issue is a hostile work environment for the nurses at this facility. 36 nurses are in agreement that this doctor is unsafe and abusive.
    this means nothing to me. you know and i know that if one nurse is p.o.'ed at a doctor, all the nurses are p.o.'ed at the doctor. this phenomenon has been somewhat demonstrated by this thread. everyone immediately jumps to the conclusion without knowing all the facts that the surgeon in question is a despicable human being and should be barred from any practice of medicine.
  11. by   VickyRN
    Quote from stsdoc
    This means nothing to me. You know and I know that if one nurse is P.O.'ed at a doctor, ALL the nurses are P.O.'ed at the doctor. This phenomenon has been somewhat demonstrated by this thread. Everyone immediately jumps to the conclusion without knowing all the facts that the surgeon in question is a despicable human being and should be barred from any practice of medicine.
    While I appreciate your contribution to the board (and your unique perspective as a student doctor), I find it rather disconcerting and ominous for your future practice that you so readily and glibly dismiss the united assertion of 36 nurses. "This means nothing to me."
    One thing is certain (hear me loud and clear, Mr. Student Doctor), the hospital cannot run without nurses. Your future practice depends on us. Patient care is no longer an oligarchy with the doctor as head, but the paradigm has changed to a teamwork approach between the patients, the doctors, and the nurses. If all these nurses are unhappy, then something is very amiss. You have to remember also (especially in nonunion facilities), for nurses to challenge TPTB and to make public statements, this can be very detrimental to their careers. All too often there are "repercussions" to the individual nurses involved. These nurses truly had to be desperate.
    If the hospital continues to dismiss the concerns of these nurses, then these nurses will undoubtedly have no recourse but to "vote with their feet." We will see.
  12. by   fergus51
    I find the notion that they are just ganging up for no reason to be a little silly. I might agree some nurses' cliques can gang up and be rude or snotty, but I can't imagine them going to this length just to be b*tches. They are risking their current jobs and their chances for future employment. Would you do that just to be petty stsdoc? I doubt it.
  13. by   Farkinott
    Quote from VickyRN
    While I appreciate your contribution to the board (and your unique perspective as a student doctor), I find it rather disconcerting and ominous for your future practice that you so readily and glibly dismiss the united assertion of 36 nurses. "This means nothing to me."
    One thing is certain (hear me loud and clear, Mr. Student Doctor), the hospital cannot run without nurses. Your future practice depends on us. Patient care is no longer an oligarchy with the doctor as head, but the paradigm has changed to a teamwork approach between the patients, the doctors, and the nurses. If all these nurses are unhappy, then something is very amiss. You have to remember also (especially in nonunion facilities), for nurses to challenge TPTB and to make public statements, this can be very detrimental to their careers. All too often there are "repercussions" to the individual nurses involved. These nurses truly had to be desperate.
    If the hospital continues to dismiss the concerns of these nurses, then these nurses will undoubtedly have no recourse but to "vote with their feet." We will see.

    Hear! Hear!

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