Doctors refusing to treat Lawyers - page 2

published on tuesday, june 15, 2004 by the associated press malpractice debate takes ugly turn doctors angrily shout down proposal to deny lawyers health care by don babwin the long-running... Read More

  1. by   roxannekkb
    Quote from oramar
    You have to realize there is only a small number of doctors who are refusing to treat lawyers and their families, very, very small number. It is ironic that in a my state where millions are going without medical care, this is the story that gets the lawyer/politicians all excited. They can't seem to get their act together to do something about insurance for the uninsured but they are trying to pass a law in Pa. to make it a crime for doctors to refuse to treat a lawyer. It is OK for everyday people to die of treatable disease but lawyers better get treatment on demand.
    That is quite true. At the recent AMA annual meeting, one member proposed that they stop treating trial lawyers who do medical malpractice, and he was booed by the majority. The AMA, of course, voted that measure down. The vast majority of doctors will treat lawyers and their families. Personally, I think it's a ridiculous way of "getting back" at them. Better to spend the effort getting insurance reform, more stringent laws governing negligence and incompetence, and so on.
  2. by   deathnurse
    If a patient threatens to sue you, stop taking care of them. Their statement constitutes a conflict of interest; they intend to harm you financially despite your efforts to treat them.

    Another nurse who assumes responsibility for their care is a fool. A hospital that tolerates their behaviour is setting themselves up, big time, for a countersuit by the caregiver.
  3. by   Angela Mac
    where is our society going? So then, are lawyers going to refuse to defend doctors? When will discrimination end?
  4. by   Gromit
    Quote from RedVaz
    The problem is with the INSURANCE COMPANIES not the lawyers. The lawyers are acting within the scope of their practice. Just like everyone here, they work for a profit.

    Laws need to be changed. Make it less profitable to take frivolous lawsuits. Perhaps as the previous poster mentioned (as they do in GB).

    The biggest problem is the insurance companies. The insurance companies make a lot of money. A small percentage of physicians lose big malpractice claims and cost the insurance compaies money. (A large percentage do not have claims.) But that is the purpose of having insuarance, isn't it?

    We have all experienced the same thing. By law we must have insurance to drive. We have to drive means we have no choice. We have to pay whatever the insurance compay says. Yes, we can go to a competitor, but the rates won't be much different-they all know they can charge us whatever they want, as long as they are close to what their competitor charges. Many of us have had insurance rates increase despite having a clean record, (just as the physicians have.) Insurance companies are reaping huge profits because the can charge whatever they want.

    I am not advocating that we should drop the insurance requirement, but that there needs to be more regulation/laws governing the way insurance companies do business.

    The doctors are mad because they have to pay high premiums. The insurance companies blame it on the lawyers, but who are the docs paying?

    FOLLOW THE MONEY.
    Uhm, just a moment. The lawyers do deserve more blame than you give them. To begin with, watch some late-night TV. You tend to see an inordinate amount of ads with lawyers all but begging you to sue, even if you THINK you might have a problem, or are dissatisfied with care. These same lawyers fight any legal efforts at trying to lower payments and insurance premiums. They feed off of this. People sue over SCARS, for christs sake. Medicine is still an art, not a science. Outcomes don't always end with rosy stories, and people need to realize this isn't the same as taking your car to the mechanic and having the oil changed. If a doctor is negligent, or causes injury, then they should pay the price. But lawyers play both sides of the fence. They help protect the insurance companies' rights to keep raising fees, require you to have the insurance, and then sue the hell out of whoever they can. All I'm asking for, and I'm sure the doctors are too, is a bit of responsibility on the part of the lawyers.
    I personally have no real problem with their refusal to treat the lawyer, but I do have a problem with their refusal to treat the family. You shouldn't be "guilty by association".
    As for nurses refusing to care for a patient, be careful, as unlike doctors, that comes dangerously close to abandonment.
  5. by   redshiloh
    I agree, those commercials for lawyers "Oh, my settlement was so much more than I thought it would be! I paid my bills and took my family on a vacation" OF COURSE people see that kind of garbage and think they can sue everytime there is an outcome they do not like. The LAWYERs are the ones that are putting that kind of ad on TV.
    We have families taking notes of everything the staff does while in their dad's room, right down to how many seconds (yes, he times them) people wash their hands.
  6. by   Gromit
    Quote from redshiloh
    I agree, those commercials for lawyers "Oh, my settlement was so much more than I thought it would be! I paid my bills and took my family on a vacation" OF COURSE people see that kind of garbage and think they can sue everytime there is an outcome they do not like. The LAWYERs are the ones that are putting that kind of ad on TV.
    We have families taking notes of everything the staff does while in their dad's room, right down to how many seconds (yes, he times them) people wash their hands.
    I know. I absolutely hate it when I see this kind of family. I'm not sure if they think that this kind of intimidation (and make no mistake, thats exactly what it is) will get them better care, but I do know that nobody wants to be their caregiver. We have one on the floor now, as a matter of fact. And they call fairly often, for such things as wanting someone to empty their garbage, etc. I do things at specific times -unless of course, these things need to be done sooner -which is rare. But intimidating your caregiver is hardly constructive.
    The ad I dispise the most is the one (at least we have it in Florida) where the lawyers are telling you to ask for "grannycams" in the nursing home. I'm sorry, but I considder it completely rude, and even irresponsible to put a webcam in grandmas' room so I can stare at her whenever I feel like it.
    GO TO THE HOME YOURSELF and VISIT them. (How would you like it if you were forced to be in front of a webcam 24/7 ?)
    There are lousy caregivers in every field, and they should be dealt with. BUT the tactics these lawyers use (a shotgun approach -saying that if you aren't guilty, you have nothing to worry about -BULL. It costs a lot of time and money to defend yourself) will eventually drive healthcare personnel away. Where will these people go then? Thanks to malpractice insurance going through the roof, many doctors are leaving florida. Can't say I blame them.
  7. by   Farkinott
    Quote from brian
    Just a few thoughts....So do nurses have rights to refuse to take care of certain patients? Isn't this a form of discrimination?
    All through my nursing career it has been that if there was or is a legitimate problem with a particular client then you have the right to not deal with them (provided someone else can take over care). It makes good sense to keep apart people that may have issues. Most often I have seen this kind of thing happen when the client makes racist or sexist comments to caregivers.
    Malpractice suits and the litigious nature of the US have pushed medical insurance through the roof. It is now happening in the land of OZ. O&G doctors are a dying breed simply due to the exhorbitant premiums and the greater risk of being subject of a malpractice suit. I don't blame those doctors refusing to treat lawyers and close family of unless in an emrgency.
  8. by   All_Smiles_RN
    I think the solution is to have some dedicated medical professionals go to law school for the sole purpose of taking on trial lawyers AND the insurance companies. I used to wonder if law was for me, but the unethical qualities that lawyers portray are not for me. Maybe later on in life....
    ...Jennifer...
  9. by   Headhurt
    I can't say as I blame the doctors. How odd would it be to have a lawyer claim you are incompetent oaf in the courtroom one day, and then treat that same lawyer the following day as your patient? If you were a doctor, and your practice has been called into question by a "well get you the settlement you deserve" lawyer, could you really provide impartial care?

    We need some serious tort reform. I'm not talking about the patient who had the wrong leg taken off or serious things like that. I'm talking about the pinhead who sues because their needs for hot coffee were not met because you were too busy coding the woman next door.
  10. by   Gromit
    Hehehe, I worked at the leg hospital for a little while -after the leg incident.
  11. by   teeituptom
    why should they treat lawyers
    after all they are not veternarians
  12. by   Headhurt
    Quote from teeituptom
    why should they treat lawyers
    after all they are not veternarians
    BWAHAHAHAHA!!!
  13. by   VickyRN
    Quote from teeituptom
    why should they treat lawyers
    after all they are not veternarians
    Too funny :chuckle

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