Doctors with Gay Bias Denied Meds, Man Says

  1. 0
    Hello everyone. This is the first time I've posted anything but I just couldn't let this go.
    One of my very good non-nursing friends posted this article on facebook and it got me to thinking.

    The article describes a Gay man that is HIV positive being denied his medications for HIV and his sister also being denied visitation rights all because a Doctor believed the patient was "going against God's will."

    The link to the article is below.

    http://www.courthousenews.com/2012/06/01/47019.htm

    My first reaction believe it or not was not in regard to the doctor. It was in regard to the complete lack of action from the nurses. The majority of nurses I know are not pushovers! They would have had the balls to go against the doctor and allow the sister to bring the patients medication in and visit her brother. And quite frankly I think that any nurse who could have gotten fired for doing that for this patient would have easily won a lawsuit against the hospital.

    What do all of you think?

    ~Heidi RN
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  4. 11 Comments so far...

  5. 1
    Cultures of fear and blame in hospitals/among providers often lead to a lack of advocacy. If this happened the way it was described, how sad and disgusting
    PRICHARILLAisMISSED likes this.
  6. 2
    This is the part of the article I take issue with:
    "Plaintiff witnessed his sister leave his medication with the nurses' station and it was not until this time that the nurses, seeing that the plaintiff had witnessed his sister give his medication to the nurses, that the nurses eventually gave plaintiff his medication," the complaint states.

    I feel like there HAS to be more to this story. In any given day, you have at least 2 nurses taking care of someone who's inpatient. The admitting nurse should have known that the patient was on these meds if she did a thorough admission and she should have done whatever she needed to do to get said meds ordered. When I worked in the hospital, I was relentless about this. And, it appears that the patient had asked for his meds. Why did his sister have to bring them in? What kind of hospital was he at that the pharmacy couldn't get them?

    Obviously, the nurses couldn't just up and administer medications without an order and I'd have a hard time believing that all the nurses were in cohoots with the doctor to keep his medication from him. I can't even imagine nurses plotting to not adminster medication because of personal beliefs and then only doing it because they knew that the plaintiff saw his sister drop them off.

    This doctor sounds like a real piece of work. I am glad I live in Massachusetts.
    PRICHARILLAisMISSED and kids like this.
  7. 1
    Quote from KelRN215
    This is the part of the article I take issue with:
    "Plaintiff witnessed his sister leave his medication with the nurses' station and it was not until this time that the nurses, seeing that the plaintiff had witnessed his sister give his medication to the nurses, that the nurses eventually gave plaintiff his medication," the complaint states.

    I feel like there HAS to be more to this story. In any given day, you have at least 2 nurses taking care of someone who's inpatient. The admitting nurse should have known that the patient was on these meds if she did a thorough admission and she should have done whatever she needed to do to get said meds ordered. When I worked in the hospital, I was relentless about this. And, it appears that the patient had asked for his meds. Why did his sister have to bring them in? What kind of hospital was he at that the pharmacy couldn't get them?

    Obviously, the nurses couldn't just up and administer medications without an order and I'd have a hard time believing that all the nurses were in cohoots with the doctor to keep his medication from him. I can't even imagine nurses plotting to not adminster medication because of personal beliefs and then only doing it because they knew that the plaintiff saw his sister drop them off.

    This doctor sounds like a real piece of work. I am glad I live in Massachusetts.
    I agree. It's 2012 and most nurses I know are so over the "punish the gays for HIV" mentality, if they ever had one to begin with. And I live in the Bible Belt.
    kids likes this.
  8. 3
    This patient was admittedly to psychiatry for a reason. I wonder if there's some degree of paranoia playing into this story.
    Ayvah, KelRN215, and Altra like this.
  9. 1
    obviously, there's more to the story that is offered to the general public, therefore, i can't give an honest criticism on this topic. needless to say, even though i'm appalled to even think that at the 21 century anyone that calls themselves a health professional, would place their believes prior of rendering any health assistance to any human being, it's totally beyond any comprehension . having said that, i'm aware of this kind of individuals however, i decline to work with such ignorance attitude.
    Ayvah likes this.
  10. 1
    I also find it interesting that mainstream news hasn't picked up this story. Searching the man's name on Google News yeilds only the story linked here and a version of it on a gay rights website that heavily quotes the other article.
    Altra likes this.
  11. 0
    Quote from KelRN215
    Obviously, the nurses couldn't just up and administer medications without an order and I'd have a hard time believing that all the nurses were in cohoots with the doctor to keep his medication from him. I can't even imagine nurses plotting to not adminster medication because of personal beliefs and then only doing it because they knew that the plaintiff saw his sister drop them off.
    I think it's like you said - they couldn't administer it without an order and it sounded like there was no way in hell this doctor wanted to order those medications.
  12. 0
    I don't believe it.
  13. 0
    I believe there is something missing as well. It is just weird that I can only find one other mention of this on the below website.

    Doctor Denies HIV+ Man Meds “For Going Against God’s Will” / Queerty

    I wasn't worried about having an order for the medication because I was thinking about the facility I work at. We have a Internal medicine Hospitalist group and one of them surely would have ordered the medication. Also I think a nurse for the patient could easily have taken the order from the patients personal doctor if they really couldn't find a doctor in the facility that would order the medication.

    I've only been a RN for a year and 7 months now but honestly the patient has a right to his medication, his sister could have brought it in to his room and he could have took it. Its his choice. Regardless of order or not.

    There has to be information missing in this case somewhere though.


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