Diagnosis: Not Enough Nurses [Newsweek] - page 2

From Newsweek The national shortage is already acute—and your safety is at risk. How to fix the problem. Dec. 12, 2005 issue - When Liz Tattersall first considered nursing, it sounded like a... Read More

  1. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    If hospitals want nurses to stay, the best thing that could be done is to improve nurse-to-patient ratios.

    It is my firm belief that the reason nurses are burning out at the bedside is that the current staffing ratios of most hospitals are unrealistic and unworkable.
    very well-said.
  2. by   pricklypear
    Quote from Angie O'Plasty, RN
    If hospitals want nurses to stay, the best thing that could be done is to improve nurse-to-patient ratios.

    It is my firm belief that the reason nurses are burning out at the bedside is that the current staffing ratios of most hospitals are unrealistic and unworkable.
    Totally right on. It's not about benefits, vacations, or even pay. It's the attitude of "do more with less and less." Shove more paperwork down our throats, make us even more responsible for what everybody else should be doing, then don't back us up in the end. Always the low man on the totem pole.

    Right now, my job is making me feel like I'm not much smarter or competent than the average idiot. I need to be told how to do everything. From how to dress to how to "get along with peers." Can't even be trusted to draw up and administer insulin without a witness. But it's perfectly OK to give me several critically ill patients and no help. As long as I'm dressed according to code and not chewing gum.
  3. by   SharonH, RN
    Quote from ocankhe
    There are many career paths opened to RNs. Just because a RN chooses to work in an area other then direct patient care doesn't mean that the RN has left the Nursing profession. The shortage is not in the number of RNs but rather in the RNs who are willing to work in the conditions typically found in todays hospitals clinic and nursing homes. At one time over 90% of employment opportunites for RN were hospital based. That number has dwindled to the high 50% range. Thats the main reason for the shortage. Employment opportunities outside of direct patient care and hospital not willing to compete in the non hospital market place for RNs.

    I agree that there is a shortage of nurses who are willing to work at the bedside. However, I am not so sure that the reason is due to competition from non-bedside opportunities. Personally, if I am unable to find work outside of the hospital in the future I will look for work outside of nursing.
  4. by   nurse4theplanet
    Beside nursing is difficult. It's alot of physical work and staying on your feet. You get pulled in twenty different directions at one time. It's emotionally demanding. It takes a special person to stay in floor nursing. Even if there was not a shortage of nurses, I think there would remain a huge turn-over in bedside nursing. That's just the nature of the job...
  5. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from hope3456
    Tattersall is not alone. Multiply her story by thousands of nurses across the country who've left the profession, and you can see why 30 U.S. states today have nursing shortages.


    Only 30 states? So which states aren't short on nurses and which ones are?

    I was reading on The Dept of Labor website that Kansas has a surplus of over 2000 RNs.

    Also, in some states, there are "shortages" in the major metro areas, but the nurse to job ratio in the state overall indicates a surplus of nurses.

    For example, I live in a rural area in Texas. There are too many nurses here.
    I've been looking for a job for over a year, without success. that's why I'm a traveler.
  6. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Quote from pricklypear
    Totally right on. It's not about benefits, vacations, or even pay. It's the attitude of "do more with less and less." Shove more paperwork down our throats, make us even more responsible for what everybody else should be doing, then don't back us up in the end. Always the low man on the totem pole.

    Right now, my job is making me feel like I'm not much smarter or competent than the average idiot. I need to be told how to do everything. From how to dress to how to "get along with peers." Can't even be trusted to draw up and administer insulin without a witness. But it's perfectly OK to give me several critically ill patients and no help. As long as I'm dressed according to code and not chewing gum.
    :yeahthat:

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