Death after two-hour ER wait ruled homicide - page 6

Death after two-hour ER wait ruled homicide "WAUKEGAN, Illinois (AP) -- A coroner's jury has declared the death of a heart attack victim who spent almost two hours in a hospital waiting room to be... Read More

  1. by   weirdRN
    I work in LTC. I sent a resident out who said that his SOB, CP and Nausea were all just symptoms of his hiatal Hernia. Thankfully, that is exactly what it was. However, I am glad I erred on the side of caution. Esp since now I KNOW I could be charged with homocide if I don't get him to a hospital in a timely fashion.
  2. by   CHATSDALE
    i worked for a DON once who told me if i needed to go to er no matter the problem to c/o of cps she felt that that was the smart thing to do... i don't think she ever worked in an er

    as to the denial part, i had crushing chest pain, disphorisis etc i jumped in the car and drove 20 minutes away to a hospital passing a charity hospital on the way...please don't call me stupid, my kids and the er people took care of that md said that he hated to have nurses for patients..turne out to be hh and it has not repeated in 5 years, i really don't know how i drove through traffic in that condition
  3. by   Pat_Pat RN
    What is a "triage nurse"?
    We have ONE nurse in our ER. She does it all.
    Who is this "charge nurse"?
    Hallways are for walking.....AND putting patients in if all 5 of your ER beds are full, and their s/s warrant.
    BTW: We DON'T have pharmacy after 5pm, we NEVER have a Radiologist in our facility and sometimes the (one) lab tech takes vitals in the ER.
    Welcome to life in Rural America.
    You make due with what you are given.
    Arise and overcome, it is what our Country was made from.
    Be grateful for what you have.

    Pat
  4. by   SouthernLPN2RN
    I am shocked at this. Homicide to me is an intentional act.
    On a clinical rotation I saw a pt come in dripping blood from a lac. Wouldn't have taken long to suture and the ER wasn't busy at that point. She was back in a bed for about 3 hours before anyone ever started sewing her up. I have worked in an office where things like that were treated promptly. Chest pain was always treated promptly. Another ER clinical day I saw a pt come in with CP, had an order to be admitted, had a bed, but had to wait in the ER for 4 more hours waiting on the doc to call with orders. I think that an MD's office that collaborates with the ER to see their nonemergent cases might help. The ER at the hospital I work at has the hospital owned md office directly across a small side street. They could very easily triage and refer instead of having to treat the runny noses and yeast infections.
  5. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from southernlpn
    I am shocked at this. Homicide to me is an intentional act.
    On a clinical rotation I saw a pt come in dripping blood from a lac. Wouldn't have taken long to suture and the ER wasn't busy at that point. She was back in a bed for about 3 hours before anyone ever started sewing her up. I have worked in an office where things like that were treated promptly. Chest pain was always treated promptly. Another ER clinical day I saw a pt come in with CP, had an order to be admitted, had a bed, but had to wait in the ER for 4 more hours waiting on the doc to call with orders. I think that an MD's office that collaborates with the ER to see their nonemergent cases might help. The ER at the hospital I work at has the hospital owned md office directly across a small side street. They could very easily triage and refer instead of having to treat the runny noses and yeast infections.
    ''Negligent homicide is a charge brought against persons, who by inaction, allow others under their care to die. This offense mostly concerns itself with the death of small infants or children, the handicapped, or the elderly'' No one is saying that this was an intentional act, but it doesn't have to be to meet the criteria for this charge. If it had been intentional, she'd likely be charged with murder.
  6. by   morte
    Quote from MLOS
    I found it interesting that on the preprinted juror's verdict worksheet the manner of death choices (with one circled) are "homicide", "suicide", "accident" and "undetermined". No "natural causes" or some other similar term is available as a choice.

    Having never worked for a medical examiner or served on a jury for an inquest, I have no idea if this is typical.
    i believe that "natural causes" would come under CAUSE of death, not MANNER of death.....
  7. by   tferdaise
    It's been a while since I have posted here, been alittle busy. But this header got my attention.

    A couple of things got me thinking.... (alittle background of me, I had worked in a level one trauma center for 5+ years as a ER tech, I am currently a LPN, working towards my RN)

    Why do ED's hire new grads, with NO medical background? While working the ED I saw a couple of new grads being hired, and none has previous medical experience, the ED is not a place to get your feet wet when you are a true leve one, it can be a very overwhelming place. These new grads made mistakes which I thought they shouldn't have made.

    I'm sorry to hear that who ever made that error well probablity lose t hier licesne over this. But in the ED, anyone who present with CP, should get a EKG in Triage... That is a standard of care...

    Tony
  8. by   linda535
    Quote from clee1
    This is going to happen more and more in the coming years.... until the ptb and the medical establishment get the guts to say "No, Mr./Mrs. Whinybutt. Your sinus infection is NOT an emergency - call your PCP in the morning. Oh, you don't have a PCP? Find one.... in the morning. Good bye."

    Also, the rash of Un/under-insured people using the ER as a PCP HAS to stop - like right now!

    It is unconscionable that people with emergent conditions like MI, SOB, or even a serious lac requiring sutures have to wait for hours for treatment because our ER's are crammed full of the slightly sick, chronically lame, or the insufferably lazy. Oops! I almost forgot: the severe LBP x 3 months that HAS to have some IV narcs RIGHT NOW!

    Gimme a break.
    Don't forget the hospital ER's (here, anyway) HAVE to see welfare or indigent pts when they come in, regardless of their issue or their real need to be seen. I work in a (for-profit) urgent care clinic. We see everything from ST for a day to MI pts and I am the one who has to triage, ugh. If I see a pt who exhibits or c/o worrisome sx, I get an ECG right away. Even if the ECG is negative, I have the right (and responsibility) to pull my doc to see that pt immediately if the pt's sx, history or presentation is suspicious. I can only assume the triage nurse was busy with a GSW, other MI pts and numerous drug seekers that clog the ERs today.
    BTW, my favorite pt - NOT - is the one who has discovered that c/o chest pain will get him to the back sooner... Ugh, save me from stupid people. Linda
  9. by   Hunter's Mom
    "Let he who has not sinned, cast the last stone"............
  10. by   Pilotboy
    This doesn't surprise me; you should see all the illegals using the ER as their doctors office. This takes time away from patients who have the right to be there in the first place.
  11. by   tferdaise
    Quote from Pilotboy
    This doesn't surprise me; you should see all the illegals using the ER as their doctors office. This takes time away from patients who have the right to be there in the first place.
    Ouch.... everybody has the RIGHT to use the ED when they are sick. Now from what happened at the ED that night, the Triage Nurse did not do her job acording to the standard of care for someone who present with Chest Pain.

    Tony
  12. by   Red Wing Magnolia
    I took my husband to the ER while he was having chest pain. I wanted to call an ambulance but he would not hear of it. When I got him to the ER window I told the person sitting there my husband was having a heart attack. As he walked from the desk toward the back he casually said I will be with you shortly. I am not a patient nurse! I went to the locked ER doors and started banging and screaming for help. That surely woke the place up. People came running, my husband was attended to and after suffering a massive heart attack, he survived. It is said when you have to demand health care in an emergency situation in an emergency room.
  13. by   Pat_Pat RN
    Quote from tferdaise
    Ouch.... everybody has the RIGHT to use the ED when they are sick.
    Tony
    If someone is in this country ILLEGALLY they don't have a RIGHT to ANYTHING.
    (Perhaps we have a MORAL responsibility...)

    Pat

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