Death after two-hour ER wait ruled homicide - page 5

Death after two-hour ER wait ruled homicide "WAUKEGAN, Illinois (AP) -- A coroner's jury has declared the death of a heart attack victim who spent almost two hours in a hospital waiting room to be... Read More

  1. by   pickledpepperRN
    The jury’ findings:
    http://news.findlaw.com/cnn/docs/neg...ryinquest.html


    Many emergency departments have "fast track". Each patient is triaged by a competent experienced triage RN. When appropriate they are accompanied to the "Fast Track" next door or across the street. Fast Track is for patients who do not need to be assigned to a registered nurse.
    They are staffed with physicians and LVNs, PA's, RNs, and techs.
  2. by   banditrn
    Quote from spacenurse
    The jury' findings:
    http://news.findlaw.com/cnn/docs/neg...ryinquest.html


    Many emergency departments have "fast track". Each patient is triaged by a competent experienced triage RN. When appropriate they are accompanied to the "Fast Track" next door or across the street. Fast Track is for patients who do not need to be assigned to a registered nurse.
    They are staffed with physicians and LVNs, PA's, RNs, and techs.
    That would be great, but I don't think a lot of places have the resources for that.
    At the ER in our hospital any c/o chest pain automatically move you to the front of the line. You don't even go thru triage.
  3. by   MomNRN
    In our ED, the mere mention of "chest pain" moves you to the front of the line and directly to the back instead of thru the waiting room and triage.

    Unfortunately, some of the frequent fliers are on to our ways and realize that "chest pain" is a quick way to get a room.

    I have actually had a pt tell me that he just said he was having chest pain so he wouldn't have to wait.

    I feel for this RN - it is too soon and there are too few details for me to make a judgement/opinion.
  4. by   clee1
    Quote from lizz
    She's a nursing student ... and she should know better. It just goes to show how bad it is. People will continue to abuse the ER as long as you let them.

    :typing
    Exactly my point - triage needs to have the power, and the gumption, to say - sorry, your ailment does not qualify as an emergency, and we won't be treating you here. Call your Doctor; see ya!
  5. by   mercyteapot
    Quote from clee1
    Exactly my point - triage needs to have the power, and the gumption, to say - sorry, your ailment does not qualify as an emergency, and we won't be treating you here. Call your Doctor; see ya!
    Unfortunately, triage doesn't have that luxury. ERs have to treat whoever shows up at their door, no matter how trivial the complaint. It makes it that much more important that the triage nurse has razor sharp skills, so that those who can wait for hours, do, and those that can't are seen quickly. I once presented at the ER with a most unnatural gash below my patella. I'd been washing dishes and dropped a ceramic casserole dish that bounced off the tile and lodged into my leg. Little blood or pain, but I knew it wouldn't heal without stitches. I took all the required steps, called my PCP and explained the situation, got authorization and was greeted by one of the rudest nurses I can imagine during triage. She ridiculed me for coming in, and my doctor for authorizing the visit, until I suggested she take a closer look. It took all of my self restraint not to go back to her desk and announce to her that the plastic surgeon (yes, they called him down) put 20 stitches into my leg. It is a tough job, no doubt, and it ain't for sissies. But if you accept it, you better be prepared to do it well, IMHO.
  6. by   Dalzac
    Our policy is we NEVER,EVER let cp and nausea and sit in the waiting room They immediatly go to a trauma room, maybe after ekg's and bloodwork we may move them to a more appropiate room
  7. by   Katnip
    Quote from clee1
    Exactly my point - triage needs to have the power, and the gumption, to say - sorry, your ailment does not qualify as an emergency, and we won't be treating you here. Call your Doctor; see ya!
    That would be against the law. A person presenting to an ER must be evaluated by a physician or mid-level practicioner before determining whether the patient is in a life-threatening situation. Triage doesn't count for that.

    Nobody is going to have a doc sit at the triage desk and do an eval on everyone who comes in.
  8. by   nyyfan12
    My question is this - Where was the charge nurse? who should be aware of who is in the waiting room?, and determining who is brought back first?

    That person has just as big a responsibility as the triage nurse.
  9. by   Sal Manilla
    Ouch. Sounds like this woman would have had better odds if she'd called an ambulance. EMTs would have been sure to slap an ECG on her and it's got to be hard for ER staff to blow off a couple of EMTs. Am I wrong?

    And yeah, this does sound like it's within the bounds of criminal law. Gotta wonder exactly what goes into a bad decision like that.
  10. by   clee1
    Quote from cyberkat
    That would be against the law. A person presenting to an ER must be evaluated by a physician or mid-level practicioner before determining whether the patient is in a life-threatening situation. Triage doesn't count for that.

    Nobody is going to have a doc sit at the triage desk and do an eval on everyone who comes in.
    OK.... I can see that point. But, with the ED implosion we are currently witnessing, I can see the possibility that triage will become the domain of a NP or PA.

    I can also see the law changing once more people die d/t rediculous ED wait times. More quickly if one of those that dies happens to be a VIP.
  11. by   Altra
    Quote from spacenurse
    I found it interesting that on the preprinted juror's verdict worksheet the manner of death choices (with one circled) are "homicide", "suicide", "accident" and "undetermined". No "natural causes" or some other similar term is available as a choice.

    Having never worked for a medical examiner or served on a jury for an inquest, I have no idea if this is typical.
  12. by   charebec65
    Quote from MLOS
    I found it interesting that on the preprinted juror's verdict worksheet the manner of death choices (with one circled) are "homicide", "suicide", "accident" and "undetermined". No "natural causes" or some other similar term is available as a choice..
    I guess in their county, nobody dies of natural causes.... that is odd...
  13. by   balutpinoysabutuan
    THIS is a LESSON for all of us!!!take good care of our patients as well as our license.:angel2:

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