Death after two-hour ER wait ruled homicide - page 2

Death after two-hour ER wait ruled homicide "WAUKEGAN, Illinois (AP) -- A coroner's jury has declared the death of a heart attack victim who spent almost two hours in a hospital waiting room to be... Read More

  1. by   P_RN
    I noticed the other day an ER called "Chest Pain ER." I have no idea if this is an improvement as I was just passing by on my way to visit the doctor.
  2. by   leslie :-D
    Quote from ERNP
    It seems to me that the legislature, not the coroner, should undertake to redefine homicide. I don't think this rises to homicide. Maybe involuntary manslaughter if there is to be any criminal pursuit at all.

    Definitely civil legal country.... failure to rescue, violation of nationally accepted standard of care....

    But do remember to view everything you read with a degree of scrutiny. The news blurbs are very small snipets designed to incite the reader. Therefore, we have not even a small portion of facts surrounding this event.
    i agree with you.
    but any medical person would be flabbergasted to read this at face value.
    no, we don't know all the facts.
    i do know that when i was 35 and had chest pain after being put on the birth control pill (combined w/me being a smoker), the er triage nurse whisked me away and i was tended to immediately.
    this has always been the standard of care.
  3. by   pickledpepperRN
    Did this facility assign a competent triage nurse with no assigned patients?

    Years ago in a large ER a clerk did triage. The patient had fallen sp was sent to trauma. I was asked to take the patient to have an X-ray to R/O rib Fx.
    The patient had chest pain and SOB I took the patient to medical. The patient was admitted to CCU.
  4. by   MilitaryMedtoRN
    I dont know about years ago Spacenurse, but I do know that the triage system is in effect not just for disaster situations, but also everyday situations. I agree with Earle58, we do not know all the facts. It is shocking to say the least to read about this, and that is the way I felt. Chest pain ios up there in the "emergent" catogory of the traige system. There are alot of questions going through my mind.
  5. by   VickyRN
    Quote from charebec65
    I can't help but wonder if there's not more than meets the eye here. I can't imagine an ER nurse ignoring MI sx. Maybe the initial stated sx were different. I'm a cardiac pt. I often have chest pain and have certain criteria to follow as to whether or not go to the ER. The two times I went to the ER with unremitting chest pain and other sx associated with MI I was immediately taken back and assessed.....
    Recently had cardiac patient present to ER with complaints of "leg pain." That was it. Also he stated, "I have a history of congestive heart failure." It was only after close questioning by one of the nurses that he admitted, "Oh, I'm having chest pain, too, right now, and shortness of breath." Immediately, he was bumped up in priority and we started working on him. If we had been super busy at that time, this might have been missed.
  6. by   UM Review RN
    Yes. One other classic s/s of the MI patient is denial and sometimes their rationale for that CP is very convincing.

    I'm also assuming that this patient didn't call 911.
  7. by   MilitaryMedtoRN
    Yes Angie, you are right about that. I had a patient present one time with a waxy, ashen look. He told me "oh Im just tired", his wife told me he had a previous heart attack. Had another patient 32 years old "I dont feel well", after questioning him there was significant cardiac hx.( father and 2 uncles). He was admitted with a minor M.I. I dont know what the answer is.
  8. by   nursesarah
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    Excuse me, but she died of a HEART ATTACK, right? Them there's what we call 'natural causes' in these here parts. Failure to appropriately assist might be negligence, but it isn't and wasn't the primary cause of death.

    A multi-million dollar judgment? Probably. A criminal conviction? Boy howdy, can we put all them judges and lawyers on criminal trial that let or get people off with slaps on wrists that kill and molest again? Somehow, I suspect that there is some sort of official protection against criminal sanctions for their malpractice.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    i think a good lawyer could spin it and get a conviction on involuntary manslaughter (criminal negligence).

    involuntary manslaughter is the killing of a person when there is no intent to kill. criminal negligence is when a duty exists and a person fails to carry out that duty causing death (eg. a parent neglects their child, causing the child to die). so i can see the potential for this type of conviction.

    the question is...who would they convict? the nurse who triaged the patient or the doctor who failed to see the patient in time?
  9. by   Zebonna
    Don't you mean deadly assessment? I see nothing interesting about it.
  10. by   Zebonna
    [quote=earle58]it does sound ominous.
    semi-emergent w/classic presentation of mi?
    interesting assessment.

    Don't you mean deadly assessment? I don't see anything interesting about it.
  11. by   clee1
    This is going to happen more and more in the coming years.... until the ptb and the medical establishment get the guts to say "No, Mr./Mrs. Whinybutt. Your sinus infection is NOT an emergency - call your PCP in the morning. Oh, you don't have a PCP? Find one.... in the morning. Good bye."

    Also, the rash of Un/under-insured people using the ER as a PCP HAS to stop - like right now!

    It is unconscionable that people with emergent conditions like MI, SOB, or even a serious lac requiring sutures have to wait for hours for treatment because our ER's are crammed full of the slightly sick, chronically lame, or the insufferably lazy. Oops! I almost forgot: the severe LBP x 3 months that HAS to have some IV narcs RIGHT NOW!

    Gimme a break.
  12. by   Katnip
    Quote from ZASHAGALKA
    Excuse me, but she died of a HEART ATTACK, right? Them there's what we call 'natural causes' in these here parts. Failure to appropriately assist might be negligence, but it isn't and wasn't the primary cause of death.

    A multi-million dollar judgment? Probably. A criminal conviction? Boy howdy, can we put all them judges and lawyers on criminal trial that let or get people off with slaps on wrists that kill and molest again? Somehow, I suspect that there is some sort of official protection against criminal sanctions for their malpractice.

    ~faith,
    Timothy.
    Got to agree with you Timothy. Negligence, yes. Malpractice, yes. Homicide? No.
  13. by   mercyteapot
    It sure sounds like negligent homicide to me. This is hardly an obscure dx we're talking about here. There is precious little point to having a triage system if the most emergent cases aren't treated first. It is hard to understand what part of an MI is ''semi'' anything!

Must Read Topics


close