Corinthian Colleges Calling It Quits - page 3

The Associated Press announced that Corinthian Colleges will shut down all of its 28 remaining campuses in the wake of the $30 million fine levied by the US Dept. of Education less than two weeks... Read More

  1. by   LittleCandles
    Actually in many nursing homes, my school was respected... At the time. However when the DOE came and started investigating them (while I was in school) the reputation went out the window. Our teachers stopped showing up. In MY area it wasn't as bad as the schools in California and Arizonia. They still lied (A LOT) but even "a little bit of research" was based off other programs not PN and my ultimate reason for going was based off previous students I knew experience, which was nothing like what I experienced.

    My experience was hell. I was accuse of being racist, I was asked to sell my baby to a staff member who had all information, I was harassed by staff while in school and out.

    Oh and they tried to sneak an additional 1800 on my loan and I didn't catch it until the day I graduated and I had to fight to get that back.

    I actually did not find any negative threads about Everest PN program other then it was expensive but easy to get in if you pass the HESI.
  2. by   LittleCandles
    Also you're giving some of these students too much credit. Like I said they were luring non-English speaking students, students who didn't even have a GED (so they would get them that and then convince them to enroll in another program), students who couldn't even turn on a computer, let alone do a search on the web, students who could barely spell education.

    This school knew it had a bad rep and so they went after students who couldn't research on their particular program. I'm not saying I shouldn't pay my loans. I am and not complaining. I went to Everest because I had 3 kids at the time and needed my PN ASAP and didn't want to wait 4 years to get into the PN or 7 years to get Into the RN program at the community college. You don't think they don't use that to their advantage? Wait lists and desperation got many of us to enroll. Luckily we enrolled in the program with potential to get a job. Not the joke programs like MA, dental assistant, admin assistant, MT, ect ect ect...

    You should hear some of these students stories. They're not asking tax payers to pay their loans, they're asking CCI to pay them back.. I don't think that's a lot to ask.

    When we were told we were going to a teach out and could 1) finish 2)quit now and get a "refund" (it wasn't even guaranteed.. We had to appeal and go thru hoops but we were promised refunds and the people I knew who did this option have yet to get a refund) 3) go to another campus 3.5 hours away. They also didn't tell us we could be shut down at any time by DOE and not let back in but if we signed we wanted to finish or switch campuses we were signing we wouldn't get a refund.
  3. by   lovinglife2015
    Quote from LittleCandles
    I went to this "school".

    The education was worthless. Yes, I graduated and got my PN diploma. Yes, I managed to pass the NCLEX. Yes, I managed to get a job. However I was ill prepared when I started working. The community college students who got their licenses and graduated when I did could do laps around me.

    Luckily I am learning more in the job but this school is a joke. I paid 33,000 . Don't get me started on how unprofessional they were also. (My enrollment advisor asked me to sell him my baby for 10k or have a baby for him and his wife but it involved doing it "the old fashion way")

    I'm glad they're finally getting shut down.

    $33K?! I'm curious, why were you attracted to the school? Community college programs cost half that amount if not less. Were finances of no concern?

    edit: oh, never mind, you answered on the next page.
  4. by   Here.I.Stand
    Quote from anon456
    This is a good time to share this link again. It's very informative.
    College, Inc. | FRONTLINE | PBS
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pa1DxUWMsEU This one is, too...so far, anyway; I'm about 3/4 through Part 1
  5. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from caliotter3
    I would think that college would have been a topic of even the slightest discussion in the final three years of any American high school.
    I attended high school in a working-class city in coastal southern CA that sent only 8 percent of its graduates to four-year institutions every year.

    Upon high school graduation the vast majority of my former classmates entered the low-paying entry-level workforce, enlisted in the military, or married young and lived off parents and/or public assistance. The message I received, both from home and the school, is that college is unnecessary.
  6. by   pixiestudent2
    So I just saw a commercial for Everest. Most of the schools were sold to a student loan servicer, and now all Everest schools are considered non profit and they lowered their tuition 20%...

    Is it me or does this seem even sketchier than before.....?
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    If the school is heavily advertising and making seemingly impossible promises-----------in other words if it seems to good to be true------if they advertise during Maury Povich or Jerry Springer, well you might have to understand, they are shady----------caveat emptor. If I had my way, they would all be shut down.
  8. by   LittleCandles
    Quote from pixiestudent2
    So I just saw a commercial for Everest. Most of the schools were sold to a student loan servicer, and now all Everest schools are considered non profit and they lowered their tuition 20%...

    Is it me or does this seem even sketchier than before.....?
    I thought they were all being closed?
  9. by   pixiestudent2
    Quote from LittleCandles
    I thought they were all being closed?
    A majority of the schools were sold a few months ago, I think only the 27 that weren't sold were shut down.
  10. by   LadyFree28
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I attended high school in a working-class city in coastal southern CA that sent only 8 percent of its graduates to four-year institutions every year.

    Upon high school graduation the vast majority of my former classmates entered the low-paying entry-level workforce, enlisted in the military, or married young and lived off parents and/or public assistance. The message I received, both from home and the school, is that college is unnecessary.
    I think people don't realize how wide the education gap in our country is.

    A lot of public schools slashed Guidance Counselors; so where do the kids that don't have structure and the means-whether it be self esteem and gumption or a self image-that slip through the cracks? Social Programs? Oops, those are slashed too.

    I was able to be so stubborn and have a plan and research to do well in school, to have an idea of what I wanted to do, and have the ability to research and do my due diligence to get through the higher education process; I also was involved in social programs and projects to help me become exposed and get dozen of scholarships.

    However, what was my stumbling block was my mother's idea that I didn't need a college education, and here strife with her college-educated sisters-which could've helped, but my outlook was I was a child and I had to pave my own way to get out from under my mother's nonsensical thumb to do it my way; my fall back was my older sister who had to contend with the same mother.

    Fortunately, we are both college graduates.

    Sometimes I look back and I could've avoided a 12 year plan to a Bachelor's Degree somehow...but to be honest, it would have to have my mother behave differently, or be born to parents that were supportive enough to want their children to want MORE, regardless of whether they were illiterate or college educated.

    I am all too cognizant that when I graduated high school, was the era of selling off public school in lieu of charter schools, state control that saw public schools stripped in a city that didn't need that to happen-I'm sure there are many school districts across the county that have to contend with no budget and families where there and self-defeating self serving interests and many are falling through the cracks, along with adults who rely on the fundamentals of desperation to fuel a means to an end who, in turn, fall prey to these "commercial schools".
  11. by   E Non Imus, RN
    Quote from elkpark
    If I were three-quarters through a degree program, at any school, and the school was destroyed by some kind of natural disaster, does that mean my student loans for the education I've already completed should be forgiven? Obviously, I'm not going to be charged, or pay, any additional tuition, but why would I not continue to be obligated for the courses I've already taken?
    That would be the case if the credit transferred to other schools. In most of the cases for these students, they have a partial education that is good for exactly nothing. Can you take the NCLEX with 3/4ths of a nursing degree? A better analogy would be if I went to a fancy ice cream parlor (I'm thinking Beaches and Creams at the Yacht and Beach Club at Disney World) and ordered the most expensive thing on the menu and the waitress brought me a bag of rock salt and a bucket of cream. Yes, if I buy my own sugar and flavoring from another place and then mix it all together myself, she realistically would've sold me ice cream. But if I can't get the other ingredients, then she sold me nothing.
  12. by   elkpark
    Quote from E Non Imus, RN
    That would be the case if the credit transferred to other schools. In most of the cases for these students, they have a partial education that is good for exactly nothing. Can you take the NCLEX with 3/4ths of a nursing degree? A better analogy would be if I went to a fancy ice cream parlor (I'm thinking Beaches and Creams at the Yacht and Beach Club at Disney World) and ordered the most expensive thing on the menu and the waitress brought me a bag of rock salt and a bucket of cream. Yes, if I buy my own sugar and flavoring from another place and then mix it all together myself, she realistically would've sold me ice cream. But if I can't get the other ingredients, then she sold me nothing.
    The "schools" provided the "education" they promised the students (up until the point at which they were shut down). I do not see how whether or not the credits will transfer has any bearing on the question. The students got what they paid for. It's no secret that the credits don't transfer to other schools.

    You could make the same argument that a student who actually completed a program, got licensed, but was unable to find a job should have her/his student loans forgiven.

    I'm sorry that students made poor choices about what schools to attend, but I don't see why the taxpayers should have to foot the bill for that.
  13. by   Not_A_Hat_Person
    Looks like many Corinthian College students are still on the hook for their student debt, even though they shouldn't be.
    Nearly 80,000 students of defunct for-profit giant Corinthian Colleges are facing some form of debt collection, even though the U.S. Department of Education unearthed enough evidence of fraud to forgive their student loans, according to an investigation by the staff of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.).

    Before it shut down last year, Corinthian, which ran Everest Institute, Wyotech and Heald College, became an example of the worst practices in the for-profit education sector, including high loan defaults and dubious programs. Amid allegations of deceptive marketing and lying to the government about its graduation rates, Corinthian lost its access to federal funds in 2014, forcing the company to sell or close its schools.

    On Thursday, Warren sent a letter urging Education Secretary John B. King Jr. to provide the immediate debt relief that Corinthian students are entitled to under federal law. The department has broad authority to cancel federal student loans when colleges violate students’ rights and state law, exactly what education officials accused Corinthian of doing. Yet the agency continues to collect on debt owed by tens of thousands of people eligible for forgiveness.

    “It is unconscionable that instead of helping these borrowers, vast numbers of Corinthian victims are currently being hounded by the department’s debt collectors — many having their credit slammed, their tax refunds seized, their Social Security and Earned Income Tax Credit payments reduced, or wages garnished — all to pay fraudulent debts,” Warren wrote to King.

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