Congress is finally give nursing homes the attention

  1. 0 "Nursing Homes, like deteriorating public schools, crumbling bridges and other pieces of our society's essential infrastructure have been neglected for a long time."

    http://www.healthbeatblog.com/2009/0...-at-work-.html
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    Visit  rabbitgirrl profile page

    About rabbitgirrl

    Joined Jun '07; Posts: 141; Likes: 289.

    12 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  Ginger's Person profile page
    1
    I hope this new found interest in nursing homes will result in more federal funding funding for nursing education! While penalties for under performing and abusive institutions are important, you can't punish the nursing home system into excellence. We need to train up better leaders than the MBA's who are in charge now
    People are terrified of getting bad medical care, so we spend billions to train MD's. It looks like people are finally learning how frightened they should be about bad or not enough skilled nursing care, so maybe they'll start thinking about that when the write the next medicare education budget.
    rabbitgirrl likes this.
  4. Visit  rabbitgirrl profile page
    3
    I think you have made a great point, but here is the really scary part of the article-

    "Roughly two-thirds of U.S. nursing homes are now owned by for-profit firms, and "many worry that the top priority for these new private-equity owners would be profits, rather than providing the staffing and resources necessary to ensure top quality care for our loved ones," Pawelski explains. "Frequently, they use complex corporate structures, separating the nursing home real estate from the operating companies and putting multiple layers of limited liability partnerships between themselves and the day-to-day operations of the nursing home.

    Ownership structures with multiple stakeholders have been used by other private-equity firms to minimize liabilities and shield them from regulator inquiries -such as when cutting staff is made to improve profit margins. This is how they avoid taking responsibility--even while when taking control of the nursing homes.

    "Private equity is buying up this industry and then hiding the assets," he adds "and when residents die from lack of proper care, there is little the courts or regulators can do. Meanwhile the private investors skim off the profits to line their pockets -- or to plow the money into separate ventures that have nothing to do with nursing home care."
  5. Visit  Ginger's Person profile page
    1
    Whoa I just skimmed past that part. That is repulsive.
    rabbitgirrl likes this.
  6. Visit  BradleyRN profile page
    4
    "the Bush administration wanted to deregulate nursing homes"

    Did the bush administration ever do one uncorrupted thing? Every time his name comes up, it seems to be linked to evil. How long will that criminal walk free?
    HazelLPN, Nurseosaurus, Atheos, and 1 other like this.
  7. Visit  rabbitgirrl profile page
    3
    Quote from BradleyRN
    "the Bush administration wanted to deregulate nursing homes"

    Did the bush administration ever do one uncorrupted thing? Every time his name comes up, it seems to be linked to evil. How long will that criminal walk free?

    A-men to that!
    BradleyRN, HazelLPN, and Atheos like this.
  8. Visit  Lexnursingstudent profile page
    1
    Another nursing just went all LPN staff. WOOOOOOO!!!!! wait a minute, now what is going on here.

    Why no more RN's? does anybody know??


    I am going to ask the ANA about this?:typing
    RNMariposa likes this.
  9. Visit  WYDiceDancer profile page
    4
    Quote from Lexnursingstudent
    Another nursing just went all LPN staff. WOOOOOOO!!!!! wait a minute, now what is going on here.

    Why no more RN's? does anybody know??


    I am going to ask the ANA about this?:typing
    As an RN, there is no way I would work in a nursing home. I worked in several as an LPN and the things I saw other things LPN's doing was wild (IV push Lasix, phlebotomy on feet, the list goes on and on). When you work in a nursing home as an RN, you are usually the ONLY RN in the building, therefore are responsible for the actions of the LPN's and CNA's working at that time. How are you, as the only RN in the building, supposed to "supervise" the other staff in a 100+ bed facility when you have your own assignment of 25-30 residents? I WILL NOT put my license on the line like that. Acuity of the residents is so different (much higher) than when the "regulations" were put in place. Add that to that the fact that the management does not want to staff even minimally, it's a wonder that ANY RN will work LTC. The whole system needs to be re-evaluated for what's needed today, not 50 years ago.
    vsink, RNMariposa, lindarn, and 1 other like this.
  10. Visit  gdpawel profile page
    3
    Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said that "new rules of the game" are necessary to restore confidence in the financial system after credit markets seized up and stocks fell the most since the Great Depression. He proposed requiring private-equity firms to register with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission and to disclose information about their holdings.

    After opposing increased federal oversight for years, David Rubenstein, co-founder of private-equity firm Carlyle Group, admitted that they are not going to be able to stand in the way of including them in an overhaul of U.S. financial regulation.

    The government would have the power to peer into the inner workings of companies like the Carlyle Group that currently escape most federal supervision. Private-equity funds operate almost entirely outside the regulation of either the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Federal Reserve.

    Regulation of Carlyle's Manor Care nursing homes is good and necessary, particularly since the company accepts taxpayer funds for the majority of the residents of their facilities. The private-equity for-profit operators of these nursing homes need to hire the best caregivers available and pay them a living wage. They need to provide clean, well-kept facilities that meet all state and federal standards, with good food and good access to healthcare services.

    More and more, nursing homes are letting LPNs in charge of floors. The state nursing practice act dictates what a RN and LPN can do. Now I'm not saying that I have anything against LPNs - actually some of them are better nurses than some RNs, it's just that they are not formally trained to do the job of a RN yet they are placed in that role in nursing homes because they are much cheaper to hire.

    As far as I remember, LPNs do not receive training in nursing school on how to be a charge nurse. A RN has about 3 months of training in leadership on a floor (some as many as 60 patients). Therefore, in my opinion, the nursing homes are being run by untrained staff, if you will. The RNs hired in the nursing home my mother lived in made sure the "paperwork" was perfect. I truly believe care in nursing homes would improve greatly if all charge nurses were RNs, or LPNs had the formal training in school for that position.
    RNMariposa, lindarn, and rabbitgirrl like this.
  11. Visit  Lexnursingstudent profile page
    0
    It depends on how many residents the facility holds--- ya know????? Me and a finance specialist were talking yesterday, and we discussing layoffs in nursing, it is inevitable, like any other business, like police departments. Here it is inevitable that 100, yes, there will be a layoff of 100 police officers and firefighters July 2009. I just read the minutes of our cities town meeting. And why would that be? To put more money in the city's big wig's pockets.


    Hey congress do not care about nursing more than anything else. They care right now about the banking business, where the REAL money situaition is. Don't look for anything special for nursing, and this goes for other busineses too, becuase this mess about the banking and CEO incentives has to be straightened out, and that is going to take another year for all these hearings. So, while these hearings are going on businesses like hospitals, retailers, school nurses, and big resturant chains are going to go bust! There will even be some of the most bigges retail businesses CLOSE. Right now one of the most biggest retailers is not a 24 hours business, some stores close early. People just simply do not have the money to but stuff. Personally, I think that Wal Mart is one of the most expensive places to shop. I have seen Wal Mart's prices go up, and up, and up. The other day, I thought that their produce, KIWI was too expensive, and it was all mushy. No, my post is not about Wal Mart. but......my point is, people cannot afford to go to the hospital either, and so there will be no patients to take care of. There has to be patients (the business part of a hospital) for nurses to have a job.

    Get a VISA and travel to another country, like Scotland, Israel, CANADA (pay nurses good money) Alaska, to make good money as a nurse. Here in the US, we are seeing RN wages fall , 18.00 dollars an hour. That is sad sad sad!!! My little neice works in a nursing home, when she works extra hours a week-night shift with diferential pay, she makes more than the RN's. SAD SAD SAD


    Do not believe congress at this time about anything. That is politics!!!!!!!
  12. Visit  rabbitgirrl profile page
    2
    Quote from Lexnursingstudent
    Personally, I think that Wal Mart is one of the most expensive places to shop. I have seen Wal Mart's prices go up, and up, and up. The other day, I thought that their produce, KIWI was too expensive, and it was all mushy. No, my post is not about Wal Mart. but......my point is, people cannot afford to go to the hospital either, and so there will be no patients to take care of. There has to be patients (the business part of a hospital) for nurses to have a job.
    Your post may not be about Walmart, but mine is!

    A Substantial Number of Wal-Mart Associates earn far below the poverty line

    In 2001, sales associates, the most common job in Wal-Mart, earned on average $8.23 an hour for annual wages of $13,861. The 2001 poverty line for a family of three was $14,630.

    Your tax dollars pay for Wal-Mart's greed

    The estimated total amount of federal assistance for which Wal-Mart employees were eligible in 2004 was $2.5 billion. [The Hidden Price We All Pay For Wal-Mart, A Report By The Democratic Staff Of The Committee On Education And The Workforce, 2/16/04]
    One 200-employee Wal-Mart store may cost federal taxpayers $420,750 per year. This cost comes from the following, on average:
    $36,000 a year for free and reduced lunches for just 50 qualifying Wal-Mart families.
    $42,000 a year for low-income housing assistance.
    $125,000 a year for federal tax credits and deductions for low-income families.
    $100,000 a year for the additional expenses for programs for students.
    $108,000 a year for the additional federal health care costs of moving into state children's health insurance programs (S-CHIP)
    $9,750 a year for the additional costs for low income energy assistance.
    [The Hidden Price We All Pay For Wal-Mart, A Report By The Democratic Staff Of The Committee On Education And The Workforce, 2/16/04]

    Health care subsidies compared to executive compensation

    Excluding his salary of $1.2 million, in 2004 Wal-Mart CEO Lee Scott made around $22 million in bonuses, stock awards, and stock options in 2004.
    This $22 million could reimburse taxpayers in 3 states where Wal-Mart topped the list of users of state-sponsored health care programs, covering more than 15,000 Wal-Mart employees and dependents. [Wal-Mart Proxy Statement and News Articles GA, CT, AL].
    Your tax dollars subsidize Wal-Mart's growth

    The first ever national report on Wal-Mart subsidies documented at least $1 billion in subsidies from state and local governments.
    A Wal-Mart official stated that "it is common" for the company to request subsidies "in about one-third of all [retail] projects." This would suggest that over a thousand Wal-Mart stores have been subsidized. ["Shopping For Subsidies: How Wal-Mart Uses Taxpayer Money to Finance Its Never-Ending Growth," Good Job First, May 2004]

    More at http://wakeupwalmart.com/facts/
    RNMariposa and BradleyRN like this.
  13. Visit  Lexnursingstudent profile page
    2
    Hey thanks I enjoyed that

    Yea, I do a lot of shopping at Krogers and the dollar stores. And I like JC penney for clothing. They have some really good sales, and that is when I shop. Make sure that everytime you shop at JC Penny ask as the register for any promoted sales, becuase sometimes I find out that there was a sale and I did not know about it, like 25% off. So my point is, I have bought better quality clothing and saved way more than paying full price at
    Wal-Mart, yes sir ree!!!

    Thanks
    rabbitgirrl and RNMariposa like this.
  14. Visit  NurseJennie<3 profile page
    0
    I am a new graduate RN. As for many of other new nurses it seems that jobs can be hard to come by. So, despite the horror stories I have heard about nursing homes, I decided to apply at one since I wasn't getting much luck anywhere else and give it a try. Let me tell you, the conditions are TERRIBLE. In this facility we have about 70 patients and only three nurses that are assigned to each shift (Days, Evenings, and Nights) mostly LPNs, and each nurse is responsible for up to 24 patients. We are supposed to give these people ALL their medications, including about half who are diabetic so that includes blood sugars (CNAs are not allowed)and insulin along with the regularly scheduled meds. The acuity of these patients is too high for one nurse to have so many. CNAs are GROSSLY understaffed as well, 2 for 24 patients, most of whom are incontinent of B&B, bedridden,and unable to communicate their needs with dementia. Not to mention I have patients that need to be straight-cathed on a regular basis, 2 patients on continuous tube feedings and complicated dressing changes every shift; all the while I am to assess every patient throughly for skin checks and assesments, make sure the CNAs are doing their job, and chart on all the patients that all this was done.I was trained for two days then on my own. The DON stated that they won't allow anymore training than that. We frequently run out of supplies, for example, we ran out of tube feeding for a patient at about 8 o'clock at night, so he was off of it for 2 1/2 hours while we waited for the pharmacy to deliver the feeding, which is ordered to be on continuously. All to be finished in an eight hour shift where you are mandated to take a 30 minute lunch. Most of the nurses there don't even take a lunch because they don't have time, but get in trouble by the facility when they don't take one and get refused pay for half an hour regardeless if they took it or not. All nurses on staff MUST be in the dining room to help feed the patients who cannot feed themselves and pass out all the trays, simply because there aren't enough CNAs to do this. This takes about an hour out of your shift that you could be taking care of patients properly. Most of the nurses just "sign off" on things even though they didn't do them. Realistically it all can't be done, but it has to be signed off, and many will tell you "there is no other way" because, as I have sadly come to know, there really isn't. I am not comfortable with this and I WILL NOT put my license on the line. I do not feel comfortable with the situation at all . I constantly feel my morals being compromised and cannot give these patients the care they need and deserve. I don't feel safe in this environment. This is a for-profit facility and they seem to try and scrape by anyway they can. I come home crying because of the situation and have come to the conclusion that I will not be going back. There is no mandate on how nurse/patient ratios by the state and I really believe these places should be regulated heavily. These for profit companies should be held accountable for taking care of these residents and their staff. It is all about money for the company and not about the people. This deeply saddens me and is not what I expected to be doing as a nurse.


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