Compassion...try it yourself before you start bashing nurses

  1. From the UK Daily Mail:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/ar...#axzz2KX3NJoms
    It's very easy to bash nurses. Call for them to be more compassionate. Everyone has a story about how they were mistreated by a nurse...
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  2. 27 Comments

  3. by   Ruas61
    It seems like the UK is having a media expose of their NHS. This is like the third article I have seen in as many days for very disturbing trends and deaths.
  4. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Everyone has a story about how they were mistreated by a nurse...
    Including me.

    That said, I think *every* nurse has *multiple* stories about how they were mistreated by a patient or a family... probably one or two orders of magnitude more than do patients have regarding nurses.
  5. by   DizzyLizzyNurse
    I'm sure everyone's had rude nurses. Just like there are rude bank tellers, rude cashiers, rude doctors, rude secretaries, etc.

    I'll never forget I did my first CPR on someone a couple months ago. After the person was revived and sent to ICU, the PCA said, "Mrs So and so is asking for an Ambien." I walked in there just to hear, "Where the hell have you been? I've been asking for 20 minutes for my Ambien!!" I was shocked. I can't believe it would never cross her mind that there could be anything more important than her Ambien on the floor. I did tell her, "Someone coded. I was doing CPR." She got to be the shocked person then.
  6. by   ♪♫ in my ♥
    Quote from DizzyLizzyNurse
    I'll never forget I did my first CPR on someone a couple months ago. After the person was revived and sent to ICU, the PCA said, "Mrs So and so is asking for an Ambien." I walked in there just to hear, "Where the hell have you been? I've been asking for 20 minutes for my Ambien!!" I was shocked. I can't believe it would never cross her mind that there could be anything more important than her Ambien on the floor. I did tell her, "Someone coded. I was doing CPR." She got to be the shocked person then.
    I had a similar, though perhaps even more egregious, situation a couple of weeks ago. In this case, the code was on the other side of the curtain... the other pt was stable and without any real needs, and heard the entire code go down from the moment the medics cruised in until we called it 45 minutes later (didn't actually code until 15 mins after arrival)... the family was at the bedside in tears... and this chump was complaining about not having been provided a telephone soon enough... not just complaining but being belligerent and bellicose.

    Even had the temerity to huff at me when I crossed his path to retrieve the second rash cart 'cuz we'd tapped out the med drawer on #1.

    Really? I mean, really?

    As my dad used to say, "The south end of a North-bound horse."
  7. by   brandy1017
    If we had a code in a double room someone would always take the other patient out into the hall and try to get them a different room so they weren't exposed to the whole situation.
  8. by   DizzyLizzyNurse
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    I had a similar, though perhaps even more egregious, situation a couple of weeks ago. In this case, the code was on the other side of the curtain... the other pt was stable and without any real needs, and heard the entire code go down from the moment the medics cruised in until we called it 45 minutes later (didn't actually code until 15 mins after arrival)... the family was at the bedside in tears... and this chump was complaining about not having been provided a telephone soon enough... not just complaining but being belligerent and bellicose.

    Even had the temerity to huff at me when I crossed his path to retrieve the second rash cart 'cuz we'd tapped out the med drawer on #1.

    Really? I mean, really?

    As my dad used to say, "The south end of a North-bound horse."
    I had a resident when I was still in LTC who fell out of her wheelchair, broke her nose, and her smashed her glasses into her eyebrow. She was moaning and crying, and there was blood everywhere. This was in the middle of the hallway and everyone saw her go down. Another resident's husband started trying to stop the staff from what they were doing because his wife wanted a glass of water. One of us yelled, "The water is in the kitchenette. Help yourself. Otherwise she's gotta wait until we're done here." He actually started swearing and then tried to report us. IDK was that a control thing?? People are ridiculous. I never realized until I went into nursing how ridiculous they can be.
  9. by   NurSinging
    Futher proof that there are more horse's **** than there are horses.
    Last edit by Esme12 on Feb 11, '13 : Reason: TOS
  10. by   wanderlust99
    What's even more surprising is when you tell the patient or family that you were dealing with someone dying or an emergency and they don't care. They take no responsibility or show no embarrassment for their rude or demanding behavior. Entitlement is a bad thing.
  11. by   Overland1
    Quote from getmethisnownurse
    ...Entitlement is a bad thing.
    Depends upon which side of the entitlement a person is on.
  12. by   nursel56
    Nurses are the last port of call.
    I like that, and very often it's true. Thanks, Wooh.
  13. by   Sugarcoma
    Quote from DizzyLizzyNurse
    I'm sure everyone's had rude nurses. Just like there are rude bank tellers, rude cashiers, rude doctors, rude secretaries, etc.

    I'll never forget I did my first CPR on someone a couple months ago. After the person was revived and sent to ICU, the PCA said, "Mrs So and so is asking for an Ambien." I walked in there just to hear, "Where the hell have you been? I've been asking for 20 minutes for my Ambien!!" I was shocked. I can't believe it would never cross her mind that there could be anything more important than her Ambien on the floor. I did tell her, "Someone coded. I was doing CPR." She got to be the shocked person then.
    HAHAHA, I have had patient's complain that we turned the lights on to code the person in the next bed, come in during a rapid to demand pain meds and refuse to leave until she got them because she asked for them before this other patient decided to crump. No shock or apologies at all. My favorite is a patient I had promised to bring water too and then we found another patient in trouble. Took me all of 15 minutes to get his water. His response "I guess I should just die of thirst before expecting water from you." When I explained my delay his response "Your MY nurse, I should come first!" This is why I like dogs better than most people.
  14. by   Ruby Vee
    Quote from brandy1017
    If we had a code in a double room someone would always take the other patient out into the hall and try to get them a different room so they weren't exposed to the whole situation.
    ​Sometimes that just isn't possible. But really? This is what you wanted to add to a thread about Compassion: Try It Yourself Before Bashing Nurses?

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