Compassion...try it yourself before you start bashing nurses - page 2

From the UK Daily Mail:... Read More

  1. Visit  Ruby Vee profile page
    13
    Compassion is a very difficult thing. It's easy -- when you're not getting what you want or feel you are entitled to -- to bash nurses for lacking it. But very difficult to keep it front and center for 12 straight hours when confronted with the yahoos described above.

    I've tried caring for my mother in her home during the early stages of her Alzheimer's, and I felt somewhat like the author of the article. I couldn't take my eyes off of her for even a minute for fear she'd wander off, burn the house down or cause some other harm to herself or others. I got to sleep -- the minute I'd close my eyes Mom would be out of bed and into trouble. I couldn't even close the bathroom door to use the toilet.
    When she went to assisted living, it was the best thing that could have happened to either of us.

    Still, there are plenty of people to tell me that they'd never let THEIR relative end up in a HOME because they LOVE them too much. Compassion: try it on first.
    jmll1765, nursel56, workingharder, and 10 others like this.
  2. Get the hottest topics every week!

    Subscribe to our free Nursing Insights newsletter.

  3. Visit  MedChica profile page
    1
    Quote from DizzyLizzyNurse
    I'm sure everyone's had rude nurses. Just like there are rude bank tellers, rude cashiers, rude doctors, rude secretaries, etc.

    I'll never forget I did my first CPR on someone a couple months ago. After the person was revived and sent to ICU, the PCA said, "Mrs So and so is asking for an Ambien." I walked in there just to hear, "Where the hell have you been? I've been asking for 20 minutes for my Ambien!!" I was shocked. I can't believe it would never cross her mind that there could be anything more important than her Ambien on the floor. I did tell her, "Someone coded. I was doing CPR." She got to be the shocked person then.
    A surprising amount of people just are 'like that', i.e., selfish and freakin' rude. I won't lie - it feels good to offer a well-placed comment, burst their bubble AND make them think.

    I've never worked a TRUE 'customer service' type job and with good reason. I'm not a 'customer service-y' type person. It's one thing if someone has a mental illness of some sort and quite another if they're lucid, aware and just flying off the handle/being ugly and mean because 'that's just how they are'.
    Seems like this is required and I never knew that until I joined the nursing sector of the hospital.
    To be honest, I'm very much ill-suited for that aspect of the job.
    That's all that I have to say.
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  4. Visit  Sugarcoma profile page
    5
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Still, there are plenty of people to tell me that they'd never let THEIR relative end up in a HOME because they LOVE them too much. Compassion: try it on first.
    Ugh! For some, it seems that compassion flies right out the window when an opportunity to prove their own superiority presents itself.

    I can't even believe someone would feel they have the right to speak to how another person handles such a situation. Makes me want to throttle them. Really? You would have done it differently..meaning better? Well bully for you! Instead of judging others why don't you go home, get down on your knees, and thank God you've never had to make such a decision!

    My family experienced similar judgements when my brother and sister in law withdrew care for my brain dead nephew. It has made me a little bitter. The nerve of some people!
    tnmarie, DizzyLizzyNurse, poppycat, and 2 others like this.
  5. Visit  MedChica profile page
    4
    Quote from Ruby Vee
    Compassion is a very difficult thing. It's easy -- when you're not getting what you want or feel you are entitled to -- to bash nurses for lacking it. But very difficult to keep it front and center for 12 straight hours when confronted with the yahoos described above.

    I've tried caring for my mother in her home during the early stages of her Alzheimer's, and I felt somewhat like the author of the article. I couldn't take my eyes off of her for even a minute for fear she'd wander off, burn the house down or cause some other harm to herself or others. I got to sleep -- the minute I'd close my eyes Mom would be out of bed and into trouble. I couldn't even close the bathroom door to use the toilet.
    When she went to assisted living, it was the best thing that could have happened to either of us.

    Still, there are plenty of people to tell me that they'd never let THEIR relative end up in a HOME because they LOVE them too much. Compassion: try it on first.

    It's a difficult thing to deal with an alzheimer's stricken individual. Takes a lot out of a caregiver. The people who made such comments were probably looking at the situation generically.
    They just don't understand. That's usually the problem.

    I can say that 'we' (at my facility) never judge the family members of our residents...because you really don't know. Even if they never visit or sever ties...because there's always a reason behind. A back-story.
    All the same, everyone doesn't have the resources, time or ability to care for the loved ones. So, it's proper to place the resident in a place that can monitor them 24/7.

    We have our confused (and combative) wanderers and they're a handful...LOL
    All last evening, we had 3 of them. 1 amb ex-boxer. 1 90 yr old in a w/c. 1 70 year old in a daisy chair.
    In and out of rooms. In and out of everyone's bed... and fighting with each other.
    They're great.
    I wish that I could take people to work with me. They'd get a chuckle! The greatest irony? The 90 year old little woman used to be a schoolteacher and she is the biggest bully of them all! "Get out!" ; "MOVE!"
    She's territorial, honey.
  6. Visit  Jeepers_Batnurse profile page
    2
    Its harder to praise than to fault. Remember to encourage your colleagues and support those who may be afraid to ask for it.
    DizzyLizzyNurse and poppycat like this.
  7. Visit  amygarside profile page
    1
    Nurses are human beings, they become rude, angry or even sad depending on the situation. So, one has to be more understanding about them but then again nurses should also control themselves especially when it comes to patients who may try your patience.
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  8. Visit  JDZ344 profile page
    0
    Quote from Ruas61
    It seems like the UK is having a media expose of their NHS. This is like the third article I have seen in as many days for very disturbing trends and deaths.
    It's the daily mail. Their articles are meant to stir people up. Not sure what they hope to achieve.
    Last edit by JDZ344 on May 14, '14
  9. Visit  StNeotser profile page
    0
    Quote from KatieP86
    It's the daily mail. I'm not sure what their agenda is, but they have it in for nurses and the NHS. Their articles are meant to stir people up, but like I said, no idea what their agenda is.
    They are owned by the same people who bring you Fox News in the US.........Rupert Murdoch and Newscorp. Their agenda is to get people in the UK to think that privatized healthcare for some and lower life expectancy and health outcomes is a good thing. But all they're ever giving is anecdotal accounts about how "nurses are nasty"
  10. Visit  TiredRN56 profile page
    1
    We're not all that bad
    Hygiene Queen likes this.
  11. Visit  rumwynnieRN profile page
    0
    Quote from DizzyLizzyNurse
    I'm sure everyone's had rude nurses. Just like there are rude bank tellers, rude cashiers, rude doctors, rude secretaries, etc.

    I'll never forget I did my first CPR on someone a couple months ago. After the person was revived and sent to ICU, the PCA said, "Mrs So and so is asking for an Ambien." I walked in there just to hear, "Where the hell have you been? I've been asking for 20 minutes for my Ambien!!" I was shocked. I can't believe it would never cross her mind that there could be anything more important than her Ambien on the floor. I did tell her, "Someone coded. I was doing CPR." She got to be the shocked person then.
    It's a shame we're told in nursing school not to say that.
  12. Visit  JDZ344 profile page
    1
    Quote from DizzyLizzyNurse
    I'm sure everyone's had rude nurses. Just like there are rude bank tellers, rude cashiers, rude doctors, rude secretaries, etc.

    I'll never forget I did my first CPR on someone a couple months ago. After the person was revived and sent to ICU, the PCA said, "Mrs So and so is asking for an Ambien." I walked in there just to hear, "Where the hell have you been? I've been asking for 20 minutes for my Ambien!!" I was shocked. I can't believe it would never cross her mind that there could be anything more important than her Ambien on the floor. I did tell her, "Someone coded. I was doing CPR." She got to be the shocked person then.
    People just... leave me gasping for words sometimes!
    Last edit by JDZ344 on May 14, '14
    DizzyLizzyNurse likes this.
  13. Visit  HouTx profile page
    4
    I have also been following The Daily Mail stories about 'nursing problems' in the NHS.... seems like they just love to stir the pot. 'For me, the most disturbing development has been the anti-education outcry. They are correlating the breakdown in health care services to the increased requirement for nursing education / elimination of vocational training programs (1991?) Claiming that increased education is producing nurses who believe they are 'above' patient care tasks. Hmmm - sounds familiar, huh?

    Of course, no one is commenting on the NHS restructuring & budget slashing that has also occurred during the same time period ... surely that had no effect & problems are all due to those horrible nurses.

    HUGS & "attagirl's" for our UK colleagues who are having to cope with this situation on a daily basis.
    jmll1765, GrnTea, tnmarie, and 1 other like this.
  14. Visit  JDZ344 profile page
    0
    Quote from HouTx
    I have also been following The Daily Mail stories about 'nursing problems' in the NHS.... seems like they just love to stir the pot. 'For me, the most disturbing development has been the anti-education outcry. They are correlating the breakdown in health care services to the increased requirement for nursing education / elimination of vocational training programs (1991?) Claiming that increased education is producing nurses who believe they are 'above' patient care tasks. Hmmm - sounds familiar, huh?

    Of course, no one is commenting on the NHS restructuring & budget slashing that has also occurred during the same time period ... surely that had no effect & problems are all due to those horrible nurses.

    HUGS & "attagirl's" for our UK colleagues who are having to cope with this situation on a daily basis.
    The Meia has it's own agenda.
    Last edit by JDZ344 on May 14, '14


Nursing Jobs in every specialty and state. Visit today and find your dream job.

A Big Thank You To Our Sponsors
Top