Company Misrepresented OxyContin to Health Care Professionals

  1. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Office of Criminal Investigations (OCI) announced today that The Purdue Frederick Company, Inc. has agreed to pay more than $700 million to resolve criminal charges and civil liabilities in connection with several illegal schemes to promote, market and sell OxyContin, a powerful prescription pain reliever that the company produces.

    Purdue trained its sales representatives to make false representations to health care providers about the difficulty of extracting oxycodone, the active ingredient, from the OxyContin tablet...
    Rest of the story..........

    http://www.fda.gov/bbs/topics/NEWS/2007/NEW01632.html
    •  
  2. 5 Comments

  3. by   Danish
    Do you guys think there will be a lot of product liability lawsuits from addicted consumers?

    I am just waiting for the Trial Lawyers commercials to being showing up...
  4. by   HM2VikingRN
    Quote from Danish
    Do you guys think there will be a lot of product liability lawsuits from addicted consumers?

    I am just waiting for the Trial Lawyers commercials to being showing up...
    If you sell a medicinal product that turns out to do more harm than good than you should be prepared to face accountability through hte legal system.
  5. by   Danish
    Don't get me wrong...if there is liability for the safety, health, or livelihood of consumers because of misrepresentation, then by all means, the drug co should be held responsible. That is just my question. Do those of you with more experience than I, believe that the pharmaceutical company is liable for damages for Pt's who are addicted today or have suffered addiction from this medication being misrepresented as not so addictive? I hear such horror stories about this drug that I'm afraid I would never be willing to take it. Then again, I have not been through a terrible trauma.

    Opinions?
  6. by   Quickbeam
    I have always been amazed that medical professionals bought the line that OxyContin wasn't as addictive as other synthetic narcotics. Maybe they just wanted to believe.

    I work in highway safety and we've seen legendary #s of accidents caused by people who are high as a kite on OxyContin. I'll follow up and find out the person is compeltely unaware of the addictive nature of narcotics. I'll talk to the MD and they'll tell me "oh, this has no sedating or euphoric side effects".

    However, I talk to law enforcement and they say they see at least one OxyContin-fogged driver every day. I talk to PTs and OTs in hospitals and they say their out patient therapy waiting rooms are filled with people who are toasted and who drive themselves to therapy, barely with it.
  7. by   subee
    Quote from Quickbeam
    I have always been amazed that medical professionals bought the line that OxyContin wasn't as addictive as other synthetic narcotics. Maybe they just wanted to believe.

    I work in highway safety and we've seen legendary #s of accidents caused by people who are high as a kite on OxyContin. I'll follow up and find out the person is compeltely unaware of the addictive nature of narcotics. I'll talk to the MD and they'll tell me "oh, this has no sedating or euphoric side effects".

    However, I talk to law enforcement and they say they see at least one OxyContin-fogged driver every day. I talk to PTs and OTs in hospitals and they say their out patient therapy waiting rooms are filled with people who are toasted and who drive themselves to therapy, barely with it.

    We've had several nurses on this web site trying to convince us that they're perfectly fit for duty while on OC. Huge liability for their employerers. However, I do get the "wanting to believe" thing because it is your livelihood as well as your personal moniker that are at stake.

close