Brain surgery patient left in OR after doc no-show - page 4

Least the docs were somewhat punished. GARDEN CITY, N.Y. - One of the highest-paid doctors in New York refused to perform brain surgery on an already-anesthetized patient whose scheduled... Read More

  1. Visit  azhiker96 profile page
    1
    Quote from YellowBoneRN
    A physician never signs the consent/witnessing it. A nurse witnesses the consent. With that being said, who was the nurse who witnessed that consent without the patient having FULL knowledge of what was going to go down with this whole deal. What a chatastrophe.
    I doubt the nurse could have predicted that the surgeon would scamper off. If she had, surely the patient would not have signed a consent for "brain surgery unless we are unable to locate the surgeon in which case we will ask another surgeon and if he refuses we will wake you up and try again later". I do think consents for a surgeon also cover his resident or partners helping on the case but I do not think it would cover someone else entirely doing the case.

    It is a mess and I hope the surgeon who disappeared has to face the music.
    cardiacRN2006 likes this.
  2. Visit  Anxious Patient profile page
    2
    Quote from cardiacmadeline
    I am not an OR nurse, so maybe someone can explain this to me. If a patient signed a consent for a specific doctor to do surgery on them, and the doctor does not show up as in the article, is it OK for another doctor to do the procedure without the patient knowing? Because the consent has another doctor's name on it?

    The doctor's name is supposed to be on the consent form? I just checked copies of the consent forms of my last operation, and there is no mention of my surgeon's name, nor any space on the form for it to be noted. I guess that means I consented for anybody to do the surgery. Wow, will I be careful next time and add the surgeon's name myself.

    I signed the consent along with all the other paperwork just before entering pre-op with some office clerk giving me one sentence descriptions of what I was signing. When I was undressed and on the bed in pre-op, I met the circulating nurse, anesthesiologist and one of the residents. I never saw my surgeon before the surgery. I was still in pre-op when I lost consciousness. Reading the previous posts where very careful protocol is supposedly the rule with the surgeon greeting the patient, discussing the risks, etc. never happened to me. There was a very assembly-line feel to everything now that I think about it.
    Last edit by Anxious Patient on May 10, '09
    Cindy-san and wooh like this.
  3. Visit  Rose_Queen profile page
    0
    Most of our docs will put in the line for who's performing the procedure "Dr. X or So-and-so group. Frequently what happens is that a patient will come into the ER overnight, be seen by that day's on call doc, and be operated on the next day by that on call doc. For scheduled procedures, the consent is usually signed in the office and faxed over a few days before. Even if the consent is there, the doc still has to show up in preop to sign the site- marking in the office is a no-no. Basically, the doc with the initials on the patient is the one doing the surgery.
  4. Visit  loricatus profile page
    0
    Quote from YellowBoneRN
    A physician never signs the consent/witnessing it. A nurse witnesses the consent. With that being said, who was the nurse who witnessed that consent without the patient having FULL knowledge of what was going to go down with this whole deal. What a chatastrophe.
    A nurse at NS-LIJ (worked there) only witnesses the patient's signature, not the consent, per se. It is not a nurse's responsibility to ascertain the patient having informed consent. With that said, I have stopped patient's from signing a consent when they start asking questions that should have been covered by the surgeon in a true informed consent-only to have been reprimanded. This incident does not shock me knowing the institution and its policies.
  5. Visit  KathConservRN profile page
    5
    Number 1. What does the doctor's salary have to do with anything? Baseball players make more than surgeons?
    Number 2. How is his partner brought in to discussion? He is not at all liable.
    Number 3. The news media is the root of all evil. They never have the whole story at hand. Look what they did about the swine flu deaths. Everyone that died from swine flu had co-morbidities.
    Number 4. Why would anyone prep the patient without the surgeon on site?

    Stop blaming one person, the surgeon. There is more to this than what is reported.
    Cindy-san, LiverpoolJane, KeyMaster, and 2 others like this.
  6. Visit  rubyrn36 profile page
    2
    Quote from Anxious Patient
    The doctor's name is supposed to on the consent form? I just checked copies of the consent forms of my last operation, and there is no mention of my surgeon's name, nor any space on the form for it to be noted. I guess that means I consented for anybody to do the surgery. Wow, will I be careful next time and add the surgeon's name myself.

    I signed the consent along with all the other paperwork just before entering pre-op with some office clerk giving me one sentence descriptions of what I was signing. When I was undressed and on the bed in pre-op, I met the circulating nurse, anesthesiologist and one of the residents. I never saw my surgeon before the surgery. I was still in pre-op when I lost consciousness. Reading the previous posts where very careful protocol is supposedly the rule with the surgeon greeting the patient, discussing the risks, etc. never happened to me. There was a very assembly-line feel to everything now that I think about it.

    WOW I would be an anxious patient as well....assembly line....*BLECK*
  7. Visit  nerdtonurse? profile page
    0
    A friend of mine in the OR (nurse anesth) said she might give something to relax the pt, but she doesn't knock someone completely down and intubate until the doc is in the OR area -- back when she was in training, they had a doc call in for something similar (vascular surgery that not just any surgeon in the place could pick up) -- said he was in the parking deck, and to go ahead and put the pt under. They did, since usually the doc took about 10 minutes to go from car to OR. Doc didn't show, didn't show, and then they got a call from the ER, essentially saying "STOP!" -- the surgeon had gotten hit by a car.
  8. Visit  Not_A_Hat_Person profile page
    0
    I wonder about the Dr. No-Show. In Boston, about 10 years ago, a surgeon left in the middle of surgery, saying he had to cash a check. Turns out he went to buy drugs.
  9. Visit  Marvie profile page
    0
    I am an OR nurse and this whole story just stinks. I do not understand why any staff anywhere would take a patient to the OR without the doctor at least being in the building, why was the patient even put under without the surgeon having talked to her or marked her (if there was a particular site), and where was the required time out?? I can understand trying to get another surgeon but only if there was an emergency and the surgeon requested this action, but please!!!! It's stories like this that really make me ill and make me darned sure to do things safely for my patients. I am so sorry this lady had to experience this, it is a shame because there were so many safety precautions that were not done.
  10. Visit  MichelleB34 profile page
    0
    At my hospital the doctors name goes on the surgical consent. If another doctor is going to do the surgery or procedure instead we get a new consent with the other doctor's name. When we have a c-section an OB nurse has to go down to the OR to help with the baby. None of the anesthesioligists will start the spinal until the surgeon is in the OR. Even if they call and say they are on the way.

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