Black care ban nurse wins payout - page 2

Monday, 17 May, 2004, 16:32 GMT 17:32 UK Black care ban nurse wins payout A black nurse who was banned from caring for a white baby after its racist mother complained, has been awarded... Read More

  1. by   nurseunderwater
    Quote from vhope
    Wow, I think it's strange the nurse got a settlement. I live in an ethnic area where I have been banned, when requested, from taking care of Arabic Muslim males, because I am female. Male nurses/aids do not care for Arabic women when requested. Didn't know I could be awarded money for it thought. It may make us upset, but we have to respect each others opinions. If the mother was a racist, why force a black nurse on her? If all nurses were black well then that's what she had available to care for her. I think this situation is strange and fishy. If the woman is such a racist, why didn't she think about where she had her baby? Personally I think the money was inapproprate, but the workplace was right in respecting the nurses feelings. Who wouldn't love to work in a hospital that respected its nurses in such a way.
    i think what you speaking to are race issues and reparations....big subject. big difference.
  2. by   Gldngrl
    Quote from Susy K
    Purely playing devil's advocate here...

    This is the first I heard of this case.

    How does this relate, in your mind, to patients refusing a male practitioner (those of you in OB know what I'm talking about) whether it's for "cultural" reasons or personal comfort levels?
    There's a difference between race based classifications and gender based classifications under the law. When someone files suit alleges racial discrimination, in part,under the Equal Protection Clause, it's automatically a suspect classification so the court has to look to see if there's a gov't compelling reason for the discrimination (most likely not as it's a very high standard). The standards for gender classification are lower than for race and are easier to argue. Some arguments for gender preference are based upon religious and cultural mores and past trauma with members of the opposite sex. There's a lot more to it, but this is a simplified version. We make accomodations for gender preferences, but there aren't racial accomodations, that would be tantamount to discrimination. It becomes a grey area when someone desires one of the same gender (or the opposite gender) out of no particular reason except familiarity...
  3. by   janetndhlovu
    It seems to me since, there is such a nursing shortage that one would thank God for having a competent nurse, never mind what race she or he is. It is unfortuate that there are so many ignorant people in the world. It is really pitiful.
  4. by   hock1
    Quote from nurseunderwater
    i think what you speaking to are race issues and reparations....big subject. big difference.
    I see no difference, sorry. What is the difference when a black pt requests a African American doctor/nurse and I'm rushed out of the room cuz I'm a 'whitey'; or an Arab person requests an Arab person to care for them? Why can't a white request a European American? We experience racism also. I think the womans wishes should have been honored. Just because the woman was a racist pig doesn't mean she doesn't deserve to have her culture respected. That's all that woman probably knew. Maybe a kind, black nurse could have made a difference in her life. This belief comes from personal experience. I grew up in a WASP neighborhood. I didn't hang around or attempt to hang around anybody that wasn't like me. When I entered nursing school, I became closed friends with a black woman. I was flunking my a*ss off in A&P, and she offered to help. She exposed me to things I never experienced. She also exposed me to racism in it's milder and, in my opinion, more hideous form. Comments like, 'OMG whose the black woman at your house". I replied to my neighbor that she was my lesbian lover! Her eyes bugged out of her head. I chuckled and told her the truth. That this woman was my friend and fellow nursing student. She was an excellent study partner cuz she had a Chemistry degree and she saved my butt.
    Last edit by hock1 on May 19, '04
  5. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Good for this nurse! The real tragedy is that women like the racist mother in the article will continue to breed.
  6. by   Q.
    Quote from vhope
    \What is the difference when a black pt requests a African American doctor/nurse and I'm rushed out of the room cuz I'm a 'whitey'; or an Arab person requests an Arab person to care for them? Why can't a white request a European American? We experience racism also. I think the womans wishes should have been honored. Just because the woman was a racist pig doesn't mean she doesn't deserve to have her culture respected. That's all that woman probably knew.
    Quite possibly. I gave this whole thing some thought after reading all the posts here.

    My parents, when searching for an oncologist, wanted a white European male. Even though some Asian and Middle Eastern docs came with high credentials and recommendations, they wanted a white doc. As much as I tried to push the issue, and ask the question "Don't you want a qualified doctor to take care of Dad? Who gives a rip about his heritage?" I realized that they gave a rip because it was all about comfort levels. They felt comfortable with a doc who was just like them. And I let the issue go.

    Was that racist or discriminatory? Where they ordering up a doctor much like making a selection at a restaurant or fast food joint? I don't know. I don't think it was. I think it was "a selection" and it was based on a number of factors. As I watched my parents go through this process of a terminal diagnosis, I realized what mattered at this point in time was their comfort and their relationship with a doc who basically had my dad's life in his hands. Forcing some type of social agenda on them wasn't appropriate.

    While I don't agree with racism, I don't think the hospital, where patients are sick and afraid, is the place to advance social agendas, teach about racism or try to overcome what could be generations of cultural norms. Yes, regular ole' white America has a "culture" too. Much like teaching a new mom how to breast feed immediately after a C-section, while she is in recovery, bleeding and sedated is not the right time, nor do I think that rectifying racial problems in society should take place in the hospital with a sick and fearful patient.
  7. by   Spidey's mom
    I'm confused about the following statements in the article:


    "A spokeswoman for Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust said: "We made a mistake in the handling of this case by trying to provide care for a patient whose relative was racially abusive."

    "In hindsight we should have refused treatment and in future will do so."

    Does this mean they will not provide care for a patient whose relative was racially "abusive"? So, the child doesn't get care? Cause mommy is a racist?

    I really am confused about what the above means. Help me out. :imbar

    steph
  8. by   Kyriaka
    With the Arabs though it is a religious issue also.

    So I think this changes the who situation vs. black/white.
  9. by   pickledpepperRN
    Quote from Blackcat99
    :chuckle If I am ever in the hospital I'm going to demand a handsome young man to take care of me. Black or white it doesn't matter just as long as he is a "hottie"
    Has anyone seen the ad in 'NurseWeek' recruiting for a hospital with a 'lift team'?
    Three BEAUTIFUL young men with ancestors from Europe, Asia, and Africa. Perfect white teeth, big smiles, and biceps bulging from scrubs!

    Seriously Water Snake is right. As a black womanI have heard more racist remarks from other blacks. One white patient wanted to refuse me as his nurse. I had to tell him that because he needed the IAPB and I was the only one on that night competent to care for him we would just have to make the best of it.

    In the morning I accompanied him to the OR. He told his surgeon he wanted me assigned to him post op. I told him I would ask to be his nurse that night but he would have an excellent nurse to care for him until 7 PM.

    This was a few years ago and the elderly patient turned out to be a nice man. He didn't have to apologize.

    Sue! Over rudeness? NO

    Now if the hospital sent me home without pay to keep a white nurse on?
    I would file a grievance for that shifts pay.

    I would never approve of refusing care to a child based on the parents rudeness.

    To the nurse who was helped pass A&P:
    You remind me of my grandmother. She would say just about anything!

    When I was in high school some racists would throw eggs and tomatos at me and my white friends. I had no choice, but knew only true friends would put up with that.. More than 4 decades later we still are friends.
  10. by   fergus51
    Quote from stevielynn
    I'm confused about the following statements in the article:


    "A spokeswoman for Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust said: "We made a mistake in the handling of this case by trying to provide care for a patient whose relative was racially abusive."

    "In hindsight we should have refused treatment and in future will do so."

    Does this mean they will not provide care for a patient whose relative was racially "abusive"? So, the child doesn't get care? Cause mommy is a racist?

    I really am confused about what the above means. Help me out. :imbar

    steph
    I think this means they will not cater to racism (that patients and their families either agree to get care from their staff or can go elsewhere). I know in many teaching hospitals patients would prefer not to have a student or a resident, but are informed upon admission that is a possibility and if they want treatment in that hospital it is one of the conditions.
  11. by   DeiDei
    It's a crying shame that racism is still alive and very well in the 21st century. I live in Philadelphia, PA. There is a teaching hospital in a small suburb of Philadelphia called Abington Memorial Hospital. Last year a caucasian couple came in to have their baby and demanded that no African Americans were to participate in the delivery or touch their baby and the hospital went along with it....it was on our local news stations here. I'm waiting to see what the outcome of this case will be. It's just deplorable.
  12. by   mattsmom81
    I believe subtle bigotry and general disrespect is behind a lot of patients and families wanting to choose their nurses...from the men who 'want the pretty young goodlooking nurse' to those who decide they 'just don't like' a certain nurse who happens to be of a different race or personality type than they 'choose'. I've also heard families say of my most experienced senior coworkers: "We don't want that old battleaxe in this room again'. The disrespect today is rampant.

    The big problem here is patients are coddled into believing it is their right to choose: a hospital 'Burger King Mentality".. If we all have the same qualifications, managers shouldn't encourage this type of stuff. And they DO...with the current service oriented environment they push.

    That said, I really don't have the energy to fight this stuff much to be honest....I only have so much time in my shift and most nurses don't want the headache and liability of dealing with a patient or family who is hostile to them...so we cave. THEN unfortunately patients think they've won, but not for the reasons they THINK.

    I prefer to spend my energy supporting and encouraging my nurse coworkers when this type of bigotry and Burger King mentality effects them. Like Mama said, not everyone is gonna love us...doesn't mean we're not OK though.
  13. by   nurseboudin
    I feel the rise and shine of a vomitous mass in my stomach everytime I hear these stories. Be they black or white, one day on my own death bed.... all I hope is that the person holding my hand cares as much about life as I do. It's so easy to forget - when we are nurses. But that is the very thing that sets us apart from the rest of the world. We should care... it's our job to care.

    :angryfire

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