Belgium Euthanizes Deaf Twins Going Blind - page 5

I am for the right to die......however, they weren't terminal, I am not sure how I feel about this....thoughts?... Read More

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    Quote from BlueDevil,DNP
    Is that what this story is about? I missed that part.
    Preferably unwanted babies would be dealth with before they are born, but I think the board can only handle one 2,000 page thread at a time, lol. ;-)
    Yes there's a part in the book where there are two twins born, and since they society only planned for one baby from that pregnancy they euthanized the smaller one. Also the other baby in the book, the one the father took home to see if it would grow more, is the one the main character rescues as he flees their society because he fears that baby will not make the cut, either. My child read it in 6th grade as part of her class requirement. I can't remember all the details of the book-- I read it along with her-- but I do remember those dark details. I wonder how they will handle that in the upcoming movie?

    And it wasn't too long ago -- the 70's and earlier-- that in our own society we would routinely institutionalize our unwanted children and adults who didn't fit the standards of normal. I had a close family member who was born in the late 70's when that was all starting to go out of fashion, and some bills were signed to close the sanatariums and mental institutions. (Now we have more mentally ill on our streets and many are homeless-- another topic for another day). The mom of this family member chose to bring her child home but had been encouraged by doctors to tour the facilities. Also in our city there is still one such facility where several disabled adults live and will be cared for until they die of old age. They were dropped off as infants and lived there all their lives, and when the institutions were closed no one claimed them. A friend told me about it, she used to volunteer there.

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  2. 0
    Quote from Esme12
    My issue is with they are considering dementia patients...so when you are tired of caring for Momma...and she is confused....put her to sleep...it is a slippery slope.
    If that's Momma's wish, then so be it. Alas, most people don't have advance directives before a crisis happens. We hear of it daily in the news. I, myself, can't imagine a more horrifying thing than to live demented, blind, immobilized, or disabled in any fashion whatsoEVER. Americans have a most peculiar attitude towards death (often based on religion, not on the fact that, in general, every DOES die, sooner or later), and in many cases many people think they know best, and even want to control other people's deaths. Take prisoners for example, that request to be put to death? Oh, no you don't! You'll be put to death IF and WHEN we decide you will be put to death- even if we have to spend several million $ to keep you locked up, before we make 'our' decision!? Quite peculiar, indeed.
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    [QUOTE=Nurseamanda00;7145061]I have had the opportunity to talk to a few people on this issue who are from Belgium. They informed me that they institutionalize disabled adults. They are not "handicap accessible" like the US... QUOTE]

    I suspect that if you commit yourself to a wheelchair, with a blindfold over your eyes, even for a day or so, you'll find out how handicap accessible America is.
  4. 0
    Quote from uRNmyway
    Fine, but there is also a difference between removing someone from a vent or stopping heroic measures vs. euthanasia. Or at least it sure seems that way to me. Then again, I have never had to deal with either situation and pray to God (heck, for this, I'd pray to any and all gods that may exist anywhere) that I never HAVE to make the distinction as a parent.
    Isn't removing someone from a vent euthanasia? Where is the proverbial line in the proverbial sand, really? I think it might be a lot clearer, had that patient not have been put on the vent in the first place- we can't decide to prolong a life, then decide not to, without muddying the waters, can we? After all, many times the diagnosis of 'death' has been made, yet then, that 'dead' patient is still put on a vent?
  5. 0
    Quote from MandaRN94
    @ Jeweles so you would feel more comfortable seeing a loved one suffer in pain that has a terminal illness over making the decision to end the suffering? This is exactly why we make that choice for our pets. Yes, they are animals and not human but the arguument is the same -quality of life.
    Again, however- despite Americans' weirdness about death in general- we DO have plenty of options (advance directives) at our disposal. If only more people took advantage of them, alas. Think of the agony that could be prevented.
  6. 2
    It's ironic... just when we, as a society, are becoming more open, accepting and accommodating of disabilities, we have this counterpush to be more accepting of death...

    Yes, I know it's hard to imagine people enjoying a good quality of life with a disability, especially when you're young and invincible.

    I once took care of a little boy who was a survivor of meningiococcemia in infancy -- lost all 4 limbs. I remember hearing the story on the news when it first happened and my initial gut reaction was, I would not have done that to my child. I would have let him go. But you know what? This boy is growing up in a loving family, he has had excellent PT and OT, he walks, runs, plays, goes to school like any other kid. And that is only because society has determined that life with disability is still worth living, and has put the resources in place to allow kids like him to grow and flourish.

    I have a daughter with Down syndrome. She is the joy and delight of our lives. Yet 90% of parents who get a prenatal diagnosis choose to abort. Because they simply cannot imagine anyone imperfect having a good quality of life. And it was only 20-30 years ago that children like mine were left to languish in institutions. I shudder to think of going back to those years. I am fully aware that we owe a LOT to society for deciding that children like mine deserve early intervention, deserve a free and appropriate public education, deserve to have resources spent on them.

    And that's my feeling from this story too. Yes, it's very sad that they were deaf and now going blind. Could they still have had a good quality of life -- absolutely, as long as the people around them cared enough to show them how. Wonderful, they got to choose their own death. But I'm not applauding this to show how progressive society can be. It shows that we still have a very long way to go in our understanding and acceptance of disabilities.
    anon456 and Esme12 like this.
  7. 0
    Quote from JeanettePNP
    It's ironic... just when we, as a society, are becoming more open, accepting and accommodating of disabilities, we have this counterpush to be more accepting of death...

    Yes, I know it's hard to imagine people enjoying a good quality of life with a disability, especially when you're young and invincible.

    I once took care of a little boy who was a survivor of meningiococcemia in infancy -- lost all 4 limbs. I remember hearing the story on the news when it first happened and my initial gut reaction was, I would not have done that to my child. I would have let him go. But you know what? This boy is growing up in a loving family, he has had excellent PT and OT, he walks, runs, plays, goes to school like any other kid. And that is only because society has determined that life with disability is still worth living, and has put the resources in place to allow kids like him to grow and flourish.

    I have a daughter with Down syndrome. She is the joy and delight of our lives. Yet 90% of parents who get a prenatal diagnosis choose to abort. Because they simply cannot imagine anyone imperfect having a good quality of life. And it was only 20-30 years ago that children like mine were left to languish in institutions. I shudder to think of going back to those years. I am fully aware that we owe a LOT to society for deciding that children like mine deserve early intervention, deserve a free and appropriate public education, deserve to have resources spent on them.

    And that's my feeling from this story too. Yes, it's very sad that they were deaf and now going blind. Could they still have had a good quality of life -- absolutely, as long as the people around them cared enough to show them how. Wonderful, they got to choose their own death. But I'm not applauding this to show how progressive society can be. It shows that we still have a very long way to go in our understanding and acceptance of disabilities.
    Well said....
  8. 2
    I don't have the source (I'll try to find it), but read about a study concerning nurses in Egypt and participation in "euthanasia". What was interesting was the terms "active euthanasia" and "passive euthanasia". Active was described as removing support such as drips or ventilator. Interventions actively keeping someone from death. Passive was described as stopping treatment such as chemo. I've never thought of what I do as euthanasia and I don't have any shame over removing support but I guess the terms bothered me as they can add confusion or additional ethical dilemmas. Per these terms, stopping CPR is considered active euthanasia.

    I personally feel like we should be allowed to die with dignity and not everyone gets that ability. If that means in the manner that these brothers chose to, then that is their prerogative (and quite frankly it sounds like it was a thought out decisions that was supported by their loved ones). If someone doesn't believe in that then why is it their business to stop another from doing so and why do we have the audacity to tell someone how to live or die? We don't force chemo on everyone or certain surgeries. Why isn't the choice to stop treatment such as chemo (leading to death) a bigger deal? Is it the active vs passive that we struggle with?
    Last edit by WoosahRN on Feb 15
    ClearBlueOctoberSky and elkpark like this.


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