Baxter (Makers of Heparin) being sued. - page 9

Actor Dennis Quaid and wife Kimberly Buffington have filed suit against Baxter Healthcare Corp., the makers of the drug Heparin. The couple's newborn twins Zoe Grace and Thomas Boone were... Read More

  1. by   azhiker96
    I agree with you pinktwink6! I think we should only use the generic name for meds. Multiple names just makes more opportunity for errors, especially when it comes to the alphabet soup of antibiotics. I keep a med book nearby because I still can't rattle off all the Brand/generic pairs for the different cephalosporins, penicillins, etc.
  2. by   sharona97
    Quote from Valerie Salva
    1000u/ml, 5000u/ml, and 10,000u/ml vials of heparin are are in differently sized vials with different cap colors.

    I don't see how this case can stand up in court.
    Negliegence.
  3. by   sharona97
    tManufactors have a responsibility to public safety if they are a service to the public.
    Last edit by sharona97 on Dec 16, '07 : Reason: me
  4. by   one student nurse
    ok - - I am a student RN - with only 1 semester left before graduation, and wonder WHAT HAPPENED TO THE FIRST, SECOND AND THIRD DRUG CHECKS?!?!?!?

    Reading the label out loud (even if to oneself) makes a big difference. Dont trust the label on a drug drawer, dont trust that the PYXIX is correct - - READ the label.

    Saying that the drug company is responsible because the nurse didn't read the label correctly is like saying I can blame my pencil for bad spelling.

    Maybe instead of sueing the company that makes the drug (it was labeled correctly, and did contain quality product) the hospital should require all IV meds to be "high alert" and require signatures from 2 RNs for administration.
  5. by   sharona97
    Quote from one student nurse
    ok - - I am a student RN - with only 1 semester left before graduation, and wonder WHAT HAPPENED TO THE FIRST, SECOND AND THIRD DRUG CHECKS?!?!?!?

    Reading the label out loud (even if to oneself) makes a big difference. Dont trust the label on a drug drawer, dont trust that the PYXIX is correct - - READ the label.

    Saying that the drug company is responsible because the nurse didn't read the label correctly is like saying I can blame my pencil for bad spelling.

    Maybe instead of sueing the company that makes the drug (it was labeled correctly, and did contain quality product) the hospital should require all IV meds to be "high alert" and require signatures from 2 RNs for administration.
    You can do everything you are taught to do to not make a med error. However depending where you work things can get crazy and you can barely hear the phone ring. So whoever is responsible for stocking the correct drug in the designated area is a big deal. The potential for error needs to be realized at the pharmaceutical mfg level as well.

    IMO all parties are needed to ensure everything is being possibly done in a safe rationale manner for the safety of the patient.
  6. by   regularRN
    Apologies if someone has already mentioned this but I noticed yesterday at work that the heparin we administer subcutaneously - for the first time - has a bright orange sticker on the vial stating that it is not for hep locks. This makes it very difficult to make a mistake - much better labeling. However, I could not find a brand name on the vial so cannot be certain that it's Baxter's.
  7. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from Lotte
    Apologies if someone has already mentioned this but I noticed yesterday at work that the heparin we administer subcutaneously - for the first time - has a bright orange sticker on the vial stating that it is not for hep locks. This makes it very difficult to make a mistake - much better labeling. However, I could not find a brand name on the vial so cannot be certain that it's Baxter's.
    Baxter has changed the packaging in the manner you described. The label is orange and red with a tab you have to pull off before you can pop the top. Included is a warning that it is not for flushing.
  8. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from Lotte
    Apologies if someone has already mentioned this but I noticed yesterday at work that the heparin we administer subcutaneously - for the first time - has a bright orange sticker on the vial stating that it is not for hep locks. This makes it very difficult to make a mistake - much better labeling. However, I could not find a brand name on the vial so cannot be certain that it's Baxter's.
    Yep, I noticed that today too!
  9. by   awk5
    I'm a first year nursing student and the first thing that went through my mind was: the five rights and the three checks (check the med against the order three times before giving). But right on the heels of that thought was "what the heck was the manufacturer thinking?"
  10. by   vsigns
    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    Ummm, which law is that? Standard of care, yes. But a law?

    This is overkill. Mistakes happen. Get off rubbing the 5 rights in everyone's noses. We all know about the 5 rights. WE KNOW!

    Mistakes still happen. By great and experienced nurses.


    Let's try to make it easier to prevent them by looking at the system instead of repetition and regurgitation of the same thing over and over and over and over......
    Under ther law, nurses are responsible for their own actions regardless of whether there is a written order. The nurse who administers the incorrect dose is responsible for the error as well as the physician. (Kozier, P. 787).
    Kozier,Barbara(2004). Fundamentals of Nursing ( 7th ed.).Pearson Education Inc.

close