Baxter (Makers of Heparin) being sued. - page 3

Actor Dennis Quaid and wife Kimberly Buffington have filed suit against Baxter Healthcare Corp., the makers of the drug Heparin. The couple's newborn twins Zoe Grace and Thomas Boone were... Read More

  1. by   Headhurt
    At the end of the day, then blame falls on the nurse. No matter if Baxter changed the look of the labels and bottles, it doesn't matter if the pharmacy tech stocked the wrong vials. The buck stops with the nurse. Who depends on the color of a bottle cap to identify a drug?? The Five Rights are drilled into our heads the very first day of nursing school. Why didn't the nurse stop and read the label of what she was giving??

    I don't know how many times I've encountered wrong meds delivered into our Accudose. To give them and just say, "well, they were in the right bin..." is a weak excuse for not being vigilent. And I would think that those nurses who work with babies would be more vigilent.

    Blaming a drug company for another nurse's incompetence is disgusting, and the Pandora's box that will open is even more frightening. Anytime you screw up on the job, blame the drug company.

    The only way a drug company should be liable is if they put the higher strength heparin in a the low dose bottle.
  2. by   mymomisanurse
    O.k so I went to the website and yes the vials are somewhat similar but that does not excuse what happened. Those nurses have the responsibility to use the 5 rights of administering a medication. This was obvious that they did no tlook at the vials before administering the medication. The have been times when the pharmacy tech loaded the wrong medication into the omnicell but, you have to look at the medication always not rely on color. This was a senseless act that has now happened twice. How many more babies have to be injured before we take the time and use the basic info that was taught to us in nursing school.
  3. by   XtotheY
    Hi! I am in my first semester of my ADN program. My question is, will this nurse lose her license?
  4. by   crissrn27
    When you have this many mistakes, the blame does NOT lay solely with the nurses. Should they have checked and rechecked, yes. But system and manufactures failures are part of the problem, also.
  5. by   pickledpepperRN
    Hospital sends 1,400 nurses to extra training after Quaid twins' accidental overdose

    New York, Dec 5 : In a move to compensate for giving Hollywood actor Dennis Quaid's Newborn twins an overdose of blood thinner earlier this month, 1,400 nurses at L.A.'s Cedars-Sinai Medical Center are being forced to undergo extra training.

    "The day after the twins were given the accidental overdose, the entire nursing staff at Cedars were given letters informing them that when they came back to work, they would be taking a class in preventing further medication error," The New York Post quoted Jill Furillo, spokeswoman of the Southern California Nurses Association, as saying….
    ……Furillo said that the nursing staff at Cedars has been warning the executive medical committee for years that these medication errors were increasing owing to cutbacks to staffing and the labeling of drugs.

    Cedars Sinai did not give any confirmation on the letter that was sent out to the nurses.
    http://in.news.yahoo.com/071205/139/6o2vw.html
  6. by   wooh
    It's always easier to send nurses to another class than to give them the resources they need to do their jobs. (ie better staffing and safely labeled meds)
    Should the error have been caught? Of course. But I live in the real world where mistakes happen. And when a mistake is obviously this easy to make, as it must be as many times as it's happened, then something needs to change.
  7. by   Headhurt
    Quote from crissrn27
    When you have this many mistakes, the blame does NOT lay solely with the nurses. Should they have checked and rechecked, yes. But system and manufactures failures are part of the problem, also.
    No...it just means that there are that many nurses out there who are not paying attention to what they are doing. If the labels on the drug bottle had been checked (as they should have been), this would not have happened. Pure and simple.
  8. by   ElvishDNP
    The bottom line is that I am human. I have made med errors - wrong med, wrong patient, wrong dose. And anyone who's been a nurse for more than an hour has too, I'm willing to wager.

    Like Crissrn27 said - the more things between me and an error, the better. And I'd bet nobody feels worse about this than the nurse(s) who actually gave the meds.
    Last edit by ElvishDNP on Dec 5, '07
  9. by   wooh
    Quote from Headhurt
    No...it just means that there are that many nurses out there who are not paying attention to what they are doing. If the labels on the drug bottle had been checked (as they should have been), this would not have happened. Pure and simple.
    And if the heparin label had been a different color, all those nurses may have done a double take and noticed that they were about to make an error. Instead of expecting perfection from human beings, maybe we need to remember our own frailty. Have you NEVER made a med error? Or just never been caught making a med error? I'll admit, I've made errors. And with every single one of them, a system change could have prevented it. Isn't stopping med errors more important than holding individual nurses responsible for being born HUMAN?
  10. by   cardiacRN2006
    Quote from Headhurt
    No...it just means that there are that many nurses out there who are not paying attention to what they are doing. If the labels on the drug bottle had been checked (as they should have been), this would not have happened. Pure and simple.

    Whooo, lots of high horses around here.
  11. by   RainDreamer
    Quote from cardiacRN2006
    Whooo, lots of high horses around here.
    Too bad we can't all be perfect eh?
  12. by   Headhurt
    I'm not saying I've never made an error, but when I have, I've readily admitted it and took full responsibility. I never blamed the drug company because the bottle should have had a different colored label.

    Don't most hospitals employ a double-check policy regarding high-risk meds?

    If this happened to my kid, I wouldn't be questioning the drug company. I'd be wondering if the nurse actually checked what she was giving. Then, I would wonder what else she gave my kid that she wasn't aware of.

    The only high-horse I ride is that of personal accountability...which apparently has left hand in hand with common sense.
  13. by   RainDreamer
    The thing is, is that this EXACT drug was the cause of 3 deaths not too long ago, because the labels were too similar. That right there tells you that something needed to be changed as far as the labeling goes.

    Nothing wrong with more safety precautions.

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