Bachelors Degree requirement for Mickey D's!!!!!! - page 4

Bachelors required in a burger joint? Really? So, deductive reasoning would suggest that a new grad ASN-RN who can't find a job would not meet the requirements to flip burgers at Mickey D's. What on... Read More

  1. Visit  DSkelton711} profile page
    1
    I worked McD years and years ago. Our managers treated us like dirt. I knew I wasn't going to be there forever. I hated it!
    serenitylove14 likes this.
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  3. Visit  jrwest} profile page
    0
    Was my first job too - stayed there 3 years- we had great managers. was mostly closing crew;we had a lot of fun...

    funny, just realized an observation though. I hated working the register( preferred drive thru or the grill) Hated customer service. Funny. What am I doing now??? Customer service.
  4. Visit  meloda07} profile page
    1
    Ha I worked their for one month in high school and quit to work retail clothing. It was the last straw when the manager wanted me to stay an extra hour til midnight when I had school the next day. I told him no but he said I'll give you free food Who Cares About Free Food? LOL
    Pangea Reunited likes this.
  5. Visit  samadams8} profile page
    0
    Quote from TheCommuter

    BTW, I know of someone with a nursing license who works part time at a fast food joint due to an inability to find that first nursing job one year after graduation.
    This is so incredibly sad and screwed up to me, I am beyond too many words. I have a reason for this, but it will be met with political resistance here. But at least in part, it has to do with ACA. Employers have sucked it in big time. Hiring freezes have much to do with it, like it or not, it IS part of the economic reality--regardless of what you belief or hope for ACA. I know this is true, and I have been told as much by more than a few CNOs. Economics is economics. I refuse to fight about it, but I would say that it is definitely a factor. And it makes me furious that nurses are NOT able to get jobs because of it.
  6. Visit  DominicanNurse1123} profile page
    0
    My neighbor is a 36 year old woman getting a degree in psychology , I don't want to bust her bubble ... But why ?? Maybe I should save the link ... She may need it ...
  7. Visit  TheCommuter} profile page
    2
    Quote from samadams8
    I have a reason for this, but it will be met with political resistance here. But at least in part, it has to do with ACA.
    ACA will not go into effect until 2014. I should mention that the nurse who is working at the fast food joint is living in NYC, which has been one of the roughest nursing job markets in the country since 2008.

    Many nurses cannot get hired because way too many nurses are being generated right now when the market cannot absorb them all. The number of full time nurses grew by 386,000 from 2005 to 2010 and much of this growth occurred as unemployment crept up to 10 percent during that period, according to a New England Journal of Medicine report. Frankly, too many people jumped on the nursing bandwagon and trained to become nurses because they heard of the 'nursing shortage.'

    The increase of accelerated bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree programs and direct-entry master of science in nursing (MSN) degree programs also contributed to the rapid increase in the number of new nurses because students who hold non-nursing degrees can complete these training programs in 15 to 24 months.

    The slumping economic situation also contributed to the lack of nursing jobs. Seasoned nurses are not retiring because many saw their retirement funds dwindle during the economic crisis of 2008. Other nurses have become breadwinners and accepted full-time positions once their spouses were laid off during the Great Recession. Some nurses are coming out of retirement and reactivating their nursing licenses. Moreover, masses of people lost health insurance benefits after becoming unemployed, which leads to reduced patient census in places that provide nursing care.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and LibraSunCNM like this.
  8. Visit  Streamline2010} profile page
    0
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    Nursing isn't at the leading edge when it comes to degree inflation, but it's not at the back of the pack either. Appears McD's is the back of the pack. Was only a matter of time.
    My buddy who is a plumber and learned his job through a paid apprenticship makes as much as what CRNAs start at in my hospital. He will laugh all the way to the bank.

    LOL. I used to think plumber would be a disgusting job. Might actually be cleaner and less hazardous than nursing. At least you get your own choice of how much and exactly what personnel protective equipment you get to wear for exposure to pathogens and hazmats. ;-D

    The McDonald's college degree was later determined to be "a mistake," says McDonald's. That job was advertised on some private job site not the corporate.

    One of the McDonand's here pays $10/hr, no benefits. Part-time only.
    Last edit by Streamline2010 on Apr 6, '13
  9. Visit  jrwest} profile page
    1
    I have an aquaintance who has her masters in social work- can't find anything local, but can't move, so she works at Wendy's

    I used to think the BSN wasn't worth shelling out another 10,000 or so for just a 25 cent raise, but it looks like that will be the min. requirement despite money.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  10. Visit  Meriwhen} profile page
    0
    Quote from Streamline2010
    LOL. I used to think plumber would be a disgusting job. Might actually be cleaner and less hazardous than nursing. At least you get your own choice of how much and exactly what personnel protective equipment you get to wear for exposure to pathogens and hazmats. ;-D
    Plumbers also make ridiculous amounts of money. Last time I had a plumber make a house call for an emergency, it cost me just under $500--$99 just for them to show up and take a look, and the rest for fixing the problem.
  11. Visit  Not_A_Hat_Person} profile page
    1
    I grew up right next to Winchendon; it's a small former mill town (its nickname is "Toy Town") with a big inferiority complex. It's a dumping ground for foster kids, and the only non-urban school district to be labeled "failing" by the state.

    As far as McDonald's requiring a Bachelor's, I'm not too surprised. With the economy in such bad shape, it's an employer's market. I've run into plenty of RNs who are working as waitresses while looking for their first nursing job. After I lost 2 LTC jobs, I seriously considered working at Wal*Mart. When I started in Home Health, the lowest-paying nursing job I've had, I spent 6 months looking for a side job.
    Last edit by Not_A_Hat_Person on Apr 7, '13 : Reason: more info
    TheCommuter likes this.
  12. Visit  Not_A_Hat_Person} profile page
    0
    Okay, it was a joke. Still, it's probably the biggest news story to hit Winchendon in a while.
  13. Visit  SubSippi} profile page
    0
    Quote from Hygiene Queen
    But yes, it's true. Many folks just don't have the basic skills and McDonald's or Dollar General is the best they can ever hope to do... especially since many of them also lack initiative, ambition, insight, responsibility and self-confidence. Some folks often aren't even aware it is possible to do better or choose not to because it is too much work.
    Oh, but I could go on and on, but I'll put a cork in it now.
    Even if someone could "do better," we still need people who are willing to work those jobs in order for our society to continue function the way it does. Also, I can understand why a person who doesn't have the resources readily available or supportive parents would elect to not go to college...if it seems like they may invest all this work and money, but end up in a similar situation. In my opinion, any person who is steadily holding a job is deserving of respect, regardless of what the job involves.

    I think that a large part of the reason why a Bachelor's degree is less significant these days, is because college is now regarded as a deserved "experience" by so many who attend. Students decide on majors simply because they find the subject interesting, and give little weight to how this degree will prepare them for a job later. This has produced tons of people with college degrees that have not been trained in any certain skill, only with more knowledge about a particular subject. That would be fine, but when they go out looking for jobs, they apply for positions (like a bank teller) that don't really need a college graduate, but it makes sense that a company would hire the most qualified person who also has the highest level of education. Now, it's even harder for anyone with just a high school diploma to get any sort of job that they can support themselves on, and people with college degrees end up taking jobs they could have gotten with no college, but have loans to pay on top of that.

    I think that more people should opt for trade schools, or even work for a little while before college, to give them some time to figure out what they really want to do. Education is never bad, but if literature, history, or philosophy is your thing, and you don't have rich parents and want to be able to support a family, there are public libraries that are free.

    Just my opinion.
  14. Visit  samadams8} profile page
    0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    ACA will not go into effect until 2014. I should mention that the nurse who is working at the fast food joint is living in NYC, which has been one of the roughest nursing job markets in the country since 2008.

    Many nurses cannot get hired because way too many nurses are being generated right now when the market cannot absorb them all. The number of full time nurses grew by 386,000 from 2005 to 2010 and much of this growth occurred as unemployment crept up to 10 percent during that period, according to a New England Journal of Medicine report. Frankly, too many people jumped on the nursing bandwagon and trained to become nurses because they heard of the 'nursing shortage.'

    The increase of accelerated bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) degree programs and direct-entry master of science in nursing (MSN) degree programs also contributed to the rapid increase in the number of new nurses because students who hold non-nursing degrees can complete these training programs in 15 to 24 months.

    The slumping economic situation also contributed to the lack of nursing jobs. Seasoned nurses are not retiring because many saw their retirement funds dwindle during the economic crisis of 2008. Other nurses have become breadwinners and accepted full-time positions once their spouses were laid off during the Great Recession. Some nurses are coming out of retirement and reactivating their nursing licenses. Moreover, masses of people lost health insurance benefits after becoming unemployed, which leads to reduced patient census in places that provide nursing care.

    Alright. Honestly, and I am being genuine here. Please tell me why I have been told by CNOs and so many others that the hiring freezes have much to do with ACA and other related changes. Why are the hospitals pulling in the reins so tight on hiring? And when they do release them a bit, why do they go to PT hiring over full-time in many cases? You don't find this a little curious?

    Nurses coming out of retirement have as much of a hard time finding jobs as new grads.

    There's more to the big picture.


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