Baby died from injected Potassium Chloride IM

  1. Batangas City, Philippines - A one-year-old boy died last week in a hospital in Batangas City after a nursing student inadvertently injected him with a chemical compound meant to be infused through an intravenous drip, a hospital official said Tuesday.

    Dr. Renato Dimayuga, Batangas Regional Hospital director, said victim John Jesreel Halcon died of cardiac arrest shortly after the 22-year-old nursing student wrongfully injected him with potassium chloride at around 5 p.m. last Thursday.

    The medicine, he said, was meant to help patients suffering from dehydration.

    "It was an accident. The student nurse accidentally injected the victim with the medicine. But we're still investigating what actually happened," Dimayuga told the Philippine Daily Inquirer over the mobile phone.

    "This is really unfortunate."

    Dimayuga denied reports that the hospital tried to conceal the truth about the death of the baby. He said he had formed a team of hospital officials to look into the incident.

    "This incident is already in the police blotter," he said.

    He said the victim's parents brought the baby to the hospital on Wednesday afternoon. He said the baby was then diagnosed with acute gastroenteritis and moderate dehydration.

    The baby, who was admitted to the charity ward, was immediately given with dextrose.

    The victim was the second child of a couple who reside in the village of Cuta, Batangas City.

    Asked if student nurses were allowed to inject medicines on the patients, he said they were not.

    "That's what we're trying to find out. Nursing students are not supposed to inject medicines into the patients," he said.

    He noted that the nurse assigned to look after the victim was also tasked to take care of 40 other patients.

    Full Story: http://services.inquirer.net/print/p...ticle_id=54618
    Last edit by brian on Mar 20, '07 : Reason: added content
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  2. 109 Comments

  3. by   RN BSN 2009
    The nurse for the baby had 40 patients? I see the scenario here, busy nurse has 40 patients and gives syringe to student... bad consequences.. Poor baby
  4. by   lizzyberry
    How sad imagine if that was your baby. I dont think nursing students are allowed to give injections are they?
  5. by   muffie
    tragic for all concerned
  6. by   summer07
    Where was the student's instructor? I didn't think student's can give injections without supervision? Very scarey!!!
  7. by   CritterLover
    Quote from summer07
    where was the student's instructor? i didn't think student's can give injections without supervision? very scarey!!!

    i wonder how the nursing education system works in the phillipines.

    if this baby was part of a 40 patient assignment, it is no wonder that so many of their nurses want to come to the us. how sad for all involved.
  8. by   RN BSN 2009
    Quote from critterlover
    i wonder how the nursing education system works in the phillipines.

    if this baby was part of a 40 patient assignment, it is no wonder that so many of their nurses want to come to the us. how sad for all involved.

    yeah that
  9. by   Heart4RN
    I totally agree! What kind of facility is this? How do they expect one nurse to take care of 40 patients? Is that reality nursing?
  10. by   Heart4RN
    As a matter of fact student nurses are able to give injections, but we have to be checked off with our instructor (at least in my program) and be able to tell exactly why we are giving, how we are to be giving it, what to look for and where to inject, if it's an IM or IVP.
    Last edit by Heart4RN on Mar 18, '07 : Reason: clarification
  11. by   GingerSue
    very tragic for all concerned

    40 patients for one nurse?
  12. by   caliotter3
    When I was in my peds rotation in school, my instructor had to check our stuff and give us the ok before we gave any meds to our peds pts. I had the most supervision here of any of my clinicals, and I am glad that she was so thorough. There was almost no chance at all that any kind of mistake could have been made. She went over our calculations with us and everything. It took a lot of time, but to me, it was well worth it. (Coincidentally, this instructor was the one who was getting prepared to go to law school. She really had her ducks together.)
  13. by   rntoben2008
    Quote from Heart4RN
    As a matter of fact student nurses are able to give injections, but we have to be checked off with our instructor (at least in my program) and be able to tell exactly why we are giving, how we are to be giving it, what to look for and where to inject, if it's an IM or IVP.
    Same here in our nursing school in Detroit, Michigan. We were taught the dangers of KCl long before ever going to the hospital for clinicals. That is just a tragic thing. Why are they begging these Phillipine nurses to come to America to work? that is scary.
  14. by   ChocoholicRN
    During our med-surg clinicals we were allowed to give injections, but we had to have either our instructor or the patients primary nurse watch us give it. Right now I'm doing my peds clinical and we can only give PO meds or hang IV's, NO INJECTIONS, even with our instructor by our side. In children, even the smallest dosage mistake, 0.5ml, can kill a child. Not sure how it works at other schools though. My heart goes out to all involved.

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