Avoid a Nursing Degree - page 16

by FocusRN

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Surprising Degrees to AvoidA Bachelor of Science in Nursing is another one of those degrees that looks great at first glance, with a nice starting salary: the average starting pay is $52,700, which is in the top 20 of average... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Yeabut:

    For that pay scale to really mean anything you have to factor inflation/cost of living.
    Minnesota (Twin Cities) for cost of living. As I mentioned, it's not the highest or lowest. Ranked #13 out of 23 in cost of living for US cities with over 1.7 million people. Also rated by Forbes as one of the most affordable places in the country to live well.

    The 10-year figure is from the current union contract.
    Last edit by MN-Nurse on Oct 12, '11
  2. 2
    Quote from shah
    I hope I will be making $100000+ in 10 years, but life is not linear. There are turns and bumps in the road you cannot foresee. I remember when Ike visited the Houston-Galveston area, nursing took a blow.

    One of the area's largest magnet hospital shut down overnight. 5000 jobs were lost on Galveston Island. Nurses went looking for jobs in Houston and drove that market down. We have not seen the annual 3% cost of living raise in this areas since then.
    Any career or job would be affected by a disaster. I would not base any career choices on the fact that hurricanes keep hitting Galveston Island.
    lindarn and PMFB-RN like this.
  3. 1
    Quote from MN-Nurse
    Minnesota for cost of living. As I mentioned, it's not the highest or lowest. Ranked #13 out of 23 in cost of living for US cities with over 1.7 million people. Also rated by Forbes as one of the most affordable places in the country to live well.

    The 10-year figure is from the current union contract.
    *** I work in a hospital in Minnesota. I have worked there for about a year and a half. I live across the border in Wisconsin in a very low cost of living area. We bought a very nice, 12 year old, 4 bed, 2 bath, 2200 sf home on 43 acres out in the country with fields, woods, a stream and a pond for $120K two years ago. My town is listed as having a COL score of 90 out 100. 100 being the national average. Compare your town here:http://www.bestplaces.net/col/
    I make about $110K/year not including overtime. Nearly all the staff nurses who work in my hospital with more than 4-6 years experience make over $100K. New grads start around $65K (I think).
    We are well paid, have good benifits and are reasonable well treated by managment. Needless to say we are not Magnet certified, but we are union.
    Last edit by PMFB-RN on Oct 12, '11
    lindarn likes this.
  4. 4
    Quote from MN-Nurse
    union contract.
    The magic words...

    It probably includes decent medical benefits, long-term disability insurance, paid time-off for education, holiday pay, significant on-call pay, accruable sick leave, and *gasp* perhaps even a decent retirement system.

    Those nasty unions.
    dreamon, lindarn, OCNRN63, and 1 other like this.
  5. 1
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** I work in a hospital in Minnesota. I have worked there for about a year and a half. I live across the border in Wisconsin in a very low cost of living area. We bought a very nice, 12 year old, 4 bed, 2 bath, 2200 sf home on 43 acres out in the country with fields, woods, a stream and a pond for $120K two years ago. My town is listed as having a COL score of 90 out 100. 100 being the national average. Compare your town here:http://www.bestplaces.net/col/
    I make about $110K/year not including overtime. Nearly all the staff nurses who work in my hospital with more than 4-6 years experience make over $100K. New grads start around $65K (I think).
    We are well paid, have good benifits and are reasonable well treated by managment. Needless to say we are not Magnet certified, but we are union.
    Cheesehead!!
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  6. 2
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    The magic words...

    It probably includes decent medical benefits, long-term disability insurance, paid time-off for education, holiday pay, significant on-call pay, accruable sick leave, and *gasp* perhaps even a decent retirement system.

    Those nasty unions.
    Check, Check, Check, Check, Check, Check, and *gasp* Check.

    And with all those perks for us expensive RNs, the hospital system still made over 200 million dollars in 2010.
    tewdles and lindarn like this.


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