Avoid a Nursing Degree - pg.12 | allnurses

Avoid a Nursing Degree - page 16

Surprising Degrees to AvoidA Bachelor of Science in Nursing is another one of those degrees that looks great at first glance, with a nice starting salary: the average starting pay is $52,700,... Read More

  1. Visit  Flygirl23462 profile page
    0
    Quote from Derek1975
    Weird. I figured the BEST route would be to get a BSN which gives you more opportunity (the ER I volunteer in won't even look at you unless you're a BSN nurse) and it means more educational opportunity if you DO feel like you're stuck somewhere. Nurse Practitioner and CRNA are just two examples. Not to mention the school I'll be attending for LPN is dropping their ADN program (!!) and adding BSN classes.
    I just noticed that the school I was looking at no longer has LPN but RN..very interesting.
    Victoria
  2. Visit  MrChicagoRN profile page
    1
    Quote from Dream_Nurse2b
    Surprising Degrees to AvoidA Bachelor of Science in Nursing is another one of those degrees that looks great at first glance, with a nice starting salary: the average starting pay is $52,700, which is in the top 20 of average starting salaries. A great choice, right? But by mid-career, most nurses will cap out at a salary not much higher than what they began with. The average mid-career income is $68,200, less than $16,000 more than the starting pay.

    Full Story: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/The-Co...266073243.html

    I disagree with what is written. Your figures reflect a 29% increase.

    The reality is that I had multiple staff RN making ~65% more than new grads. And yes, that is for nurses providing direct patient care.
    lindarn likes this.
  3. Visit  MN-Nurse profile page
    2
    Quote from Dream_Nurse2b
    Surprising Degrees to AvoidA Bachelor of Science in Nursing is another one of those degrees that looks great at first glance, with a nice starting salary: the average starting pay is $52,700, which is in the top 20 of average starting salaries. A great choice, right? But by mid-career, most nurses will cap out at a salary not much higher than what they began with. The average mid-career income is $68,200, less than $16,000 more than the starting pay.

    Full Story: http://finance.yahoo.com/news/The-Co...266073243.html
    Checking back in on this thread with a bit of a report. Should you avoid a nursing degree?

    I'm a new grad a month out of orientation at a hospital. I can pick up shifts, but cannot float to other units yet. Scheduled at 0.8 - four shifts a week. I try to pick up one shift a week. I worked way too much in my previous career and am not going to burn myself out, so I have a limit of 5 shifts per week and no more.

    I am finding that between shift differentials and bonuses for picking up extra shifts, I am going to make at least $70,000 in my first year of nursing. If I look at my pay scale 10 years from now (mid-career according to the article above), I'll be making around $102,000 for the same number of hours. That isn't bad and outpaces the articles' numbers that many posters dismissed as unrealistic. The cost of living in my area is near the middle of the road for the USA.

    Don't get me wrong, this isn't easy money - I earn every penny of it.

    Sure, some might say, "Yeah but you are the exception!," but not really. My (magnet) hospital currently employs almost 10% of my May '11 ADN class. Around 15-20% of my class currently have hospital jobs. The others who have actively looked for work all have jobs in clinics, home health, school nursing, AL, LTC, etc and are making closer to the average starting salary in the article.

    Hard work, sacrifice, and excellent performance CAN position new grad RNs for the job they want. You don't have to be the smartest or most experienced person in your class, but you do need excellent grades and solid healthcare experience. I can't speak for every job market out there, but I live in an area where it's again middle of the road - nowhere near the best or worst.

    I would not tell anyone to avoid a Nursing Degree even in this tough economy. However, I would say if you plan on just getting by in school while holding onto a non-healthcare job to pay the bills, you are going to have a very tough time finding the job you really want. But don't blame that on the economy if you take that route.

    Good luck!
    BelleMorteRN and lindarn like this.
  4. Visit  kamaboko profile page
    3
    " If I look at my pay scale 10 years from now (mid-career according to the article above), I'll be making around $102,000 for the same number of hours."

    I seem to recall millions of people thinking the same thing about the value of their homes from 2001 ~ 2006. "My house will increase 20% a year, and it'll be worth (insert unrealistic number)". With about 16% of American adults uninsured (and increasing), you'll find less patients in clinics and hospitals which will result in less medical staff needed and less dollars earned.
    Not_A_Hat_Person, OCNRN63, and lindarn like this.
  5. Visit  MN-Nurse profile page
    2
    Quote from kamaboko
    " If I look at my pay scale 10 years from now (mid-career according to the article above), I'll be making around $102,000 for the same number of hours."

    I seem to recall millions of people thinking the same thing about the value of their homes from 2001 ~ 2006. "My house will increase 20% a year, and it'll be worth (insert unrealistic number)". With about 16% of American adults uninsured (and increasing), you'll find less patients in clinics and hospitals which will result in less medical staff needed and less dollars earned.
    Yeah, the nursing job market now is directly comparable to an out of control and overinflated housing market that crippled the US banking system.
    Not_A_Hat_Person and lindarn like this.
  6. Visit  shah profile page
    2
    I hope I will be making $100000+ in 10 years, but life is not linear. There are turns and bumps in the road you cannot foresee. I remember when Ike visited the Houston-Galveston area, nursing took a blow.

    One of the area's largest magnet hospital shut down overnight. 5000 jobs were lost on Galveston Island. Nurses went looking for jobs in Houston and drove that market down. We have not seen the annual 3% cost of living raise in this areas since then.
    lindarn and Esme12 like this.
  7. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    0
    Quote from MN-Nurse
    Checking back in on this thread with a bit of a report. Should you avoid a nursing degree?

    I'm a new grad a month out of orientation at a hospital. I can pick up shifts, but cannot float to other units yet. Scheduled at 0.8 - four shifts a week. I try to pick up one shift a week. I worked way too much in my previous career and am not going to burn myself out, so I have a limit of 5 shifts per week and no more.

    I am finding that between shift differentials and bonuses for picking up extra shifts, I am going to make at least $70,000 in my first year of nursing. If I look at my pay scale 10 years from now (mid-career according to the article above), I'll be making around $102,000 for the same number of hours. That isn't bad and outpaces the articles' numbers that many posters dismissed as unrealistic. The cost of living in my area is near the middle of the road for the USA.

    Don't get me wrong, this isn't easy money - I earn every penny of it.

    Sure, some might say, "Yeah but you are the exception!," but not really. My (magnet) hospital currently employs almost 10% of my May '11 ADN class. Around 15-20% of my class currently have hospital jobs. The others who have actively looked for work all have jobs in clinics, home health, school nursing, AL, LTC, etc and are making closer to the average starting salary in the article.

    Hard work, sacrifice, and excellent performance CAN position new grad RNs for the job they want. You don't have to be the smartest or most experienced person in your class, but you do need excellent grades and solid healthcare experience. I can't speak for every job market out there, but I live in an area where it's again middle of the road - nowhere near the best or worst.

    I would not tell anyone to avoid a Nursing Degree even in this tough economy. However, I would say if you plan on just getting by in school while holding onto a non-healthcare job to pay the bills, you are going to have a very tough time finding the job you really want. But don't blame that on the economy if you take that route.

    Good luck!
    Yeabut:

    For that pay scale to really mean anything you have to factor inflation/cost of living.
  8. Visit  MN-Nurse profile page
    0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    Yeabut:

    For that pay scale to really mean anything you have to factor inflation/cost of living.
    Minnesota (Twin Cities) for cost of living. As I mentioned, it's not the highest or lowest. Ranked #13 out of 23 in cost of living for US cities with over 1.7 million people. Also rated by Forbes as one of the most affordable places in the country to live well.

    The 10-year figure is from the current union contract.
    Last edit by MN-Nurse on Oct 12, '11
  9. Visit  MN-Nurse profile page
    2
    Quote from shah
    I hope I will be making $100000+ in 10 years, but life is not linear. There are turns and bumps in the road you cannot foresee. I remember when Ike visited the Houston-Galveston area, nursing took a blow.

    One of the area's largest magnet hospital shut down overnight. 5000 jobs were lost on Galveston Island. Nurses went looking for jobs in Houston and drove that market down. We have not seen the annual 3% cost of living raise in this areas since then.
    Any career or job would be affected by a disaster. I would not base any career choices on the fact that hurricanes keep hitting Galveston Island.
    lindarn and PMFB-RN like this.
  10. Visit  PMFB-RN profile page
    1
    Quote from MN-Nurse
    Minnesota for cost of living. As I mentioned, it's not the highest or lowest. Ranked #13 out of 23 in cost of living for US cities with over 1.7 million people. Also rated by Forbes as one of the most affordable places in the country to live well.

    The 10-year figure is from the current union contract.
    *** I work in a hospital in Minnesota. I have worked there for about a year and a half. I live across the border in Wisconsin in a very low cost of living area. We bought a very nice, 12 year old, 4 bed, 2 bath, 2200 sf home on 43 acres out in the country with fields, woods, a stream and a pond for $120K two years ago. My town is listed as having a COL score of 90 out 100. 100 being the national average. Compare your town here:http://www.bestplaces.net/col/
    I make about $110K/year not including overtime. Nearly all the staff nurses who work in my hospital with more than 4-6 years experience make over $100K. New grads start around $65K (I think).
    We are well paid, have good benifits and are reasonable well treated by managment. Needless to say we are not Magnet certified, but we are union.
    Last edit by PMFB-RN on Oct 12, '11
    lindarn likes this.
  11. Visit  ♪♫ in my ♥ profile page
    4
    Quote from MN-Nurse
    union contract.
    The magic words...

    It probably includes decent medical benefits, long-term disability insurance, paid time-off for education, holiday pay, significant on-call pay, accruable sick leave, and *gasp* perhaps even a decent retirement system.

    Those nasty unions.
    dreamon, lindarn, OCNRN63, and 1 other like this.
  12. Visit  MN-Nurse profile page
    1
    Quote from PMFB-RN
    *** I work in a hospital in Minnesota. I have worked there for about a year and a half. I live across the border in Wisconsin in a very low cost of living area. We bought a very nice, 12 year old, 4 bed, 2 bath, 2200 sf home on 43 acres out in the country with fields, woods, a stream and a pond for $120K two years ago. My town is listed as having a COL score of 90 out 100. 100 being the national average. Compare your town here:http://www.bestplaces.net/col/
    I make about $110K/year not including overtime. Nearly all the staff nurses who work in my hospital with more than 4-6 years experience make over $100K. New grads start around $65K (I think).
    We are well paid, have good benifits and are reasonable well treated by managment. Needless to say we are not Magnet certified, but we are union.
    Cheesehead!!
    PMFB-RN likes this.
  13. Visit  MN-Nurse profile page
    2
    Quote from ♪♫ in my ♥
    The magic words...

    It probably includes decent medical benefits, long-term disability insurance, paid time-off for education, holiday pay, significant on-call pay, accruable sick leave, and *gasp* perhaps even a decent retirement system.

    Those nasty unions.
    Check, Check, Check, Check, Check, Check, and *gasp* Check.

    And with all those perks for us expensive RNs, the hospital system still made over 200 million dollars in 2010.
    tewdles and lindarn like this.


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