Attention unemployed RNs! Forbes is at it again. - page 3

some of you may remember a thread i started on here in response to an article published by forbes back in november of 2009 that described registered nurse as being the number one most recession proof... Read More

  1. Visit  SunSurfRN profile page
    3
    Quote from CrunchRN
    I blame the for profit nursing education industry and also all the faculty nursing instructors who allow the misinformation to continue so that they can keep their jobs.

    This party is almost over...student loans are the next bubble in the economy.
    Aurora77, lindarn, and NJMike like this.
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  3. Visit  greytRNtobe profile page
    4
    We can argue about 99% and 1% ers all day long. It just takes away from the real issues. Many people are out of work, from nurses to pipe fitters. The nursing industry (and yes, it is an industry) wants to sell a product. First, it was become a nurse and "you'll always have a job". Now it is "No-A RN is not enough-you'll need a BSN. You can get a BSN Online -that will be another 10-20K. Oh, sorry you don't have a job but "we have to get paid". The APRN's who were doing just fine as with a Masters (thank you) are now being pushed to get a Ph.D. of Nursing. And that has been proven scientifically-but that was not enough. And, because the medical establishment feels under attack (some are part of the 1%), after all those years of extra $$$ and education, they can't be called "Doctor" because "patients can get confused". No one gets confused with a Ph.D. in Psychology, Physics, etc. They are called "Doctor".
    I have written a letter to Federal Department of Education about the scam of nursing education and have linked it to the "big ticket item" - student loan defaults. They may not pay attention to the numbers of nurses out of work, or the new student nurses joining the growing number of nurses, old and new, who do not have jobs - but they do have to pay attention to student loan defaults. Please do your part-send letters to your governors, your elected officials, and talk to young people. We have a responsibility to "tell the unvarnished truth". There are no jobs for new grads and no one wants to help new grads (because it costs too much, we can get trained nurses so why help them, we don't need them now, whatever). We are in the hole and there are too many of us down here already. Give students the knowledge to avoid this hole we have fallen into. They do not care about the people who may need our help as nurses because they have insurance and can afford the best of care. It does not affect them. Money talks- and so should we!
    Last edit by greytRNtobe on Nov 9, '11 : Reason: Spell check
    Aviationurse, lindarn, anniv91106, and 1 other like this.
  4. Visit  NJMike profile page
    2
    Quote from SunSurfRN
    This party is almost over...student loans are the next bubble in the economy.
    Bingo
    Aviationurse and lindarn like this.
  5. Visit  chuckster profile page
    1
    Quote from SunSurfRN
    This party is almost over...student loans are the next bubble in the economy.
    And just like the diamonds in the television commercial, a student loan is "forever."
    lindarn likes this.
  6. Visit  24newbie profile page
    0
    so discouraging. i am in my early 50's and just applying to some ABSN programs. these posts make me think i'll not get a job. wow!!!
  7. Visit  Altra profile page
    3
    I'd like to go to something like historymajors.com and see if all the baristas with baccalaureate degrees feel they were "lied to" or if they are about to circulate petitions to various folks or if they feel it's the fault of some corporation or government agency that their degree has not immediately led to meaningful employment.

    I do not understand at all why nurses seem to feel so entitled to secure employment. Health care is largely private enterprise in the US, and it waxes and wanes pretty cyclically, just like every other industry.
    Aurora77, caroladybelle, and Ginapixi like this.
  8. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    2
    Quote from kcmylorn
    CSPAN broadcasted a few weeks ago a congressional hearing on Aging- It was moderated by Sen Bernie Sanders form VT. The topic of the hearings was Social Security and Medicare. One of the panalists that testified was a woman with a BA in Liberal Arts age 61 yr old. her testimony was at age 50 she was divorced, at age 52 she was unemployed- with 2 teen boys to raise, Looked for a job any job for 3-4 yrs- found many little temporary jobs and at one point she had 5 little jobs to try an equal 1 fulltime paycheck, every where she went to apply they would look at her and say "but your at that age" meaning to old to find a job.After years of going to school she finally got her BA in Liberal arts at age 61, got 1 son through college and the other almost. She testified that at one point she was forced to go to the food pantry and at the register was the town's richest woman who she knew, she testified she cried of embarrasment all the way home. This woman's name Is Mrs Ruddles and she lives in the North Kingdom of VT. She pushed her way into a job as an administrative assistance of that town's outreach program. The question was during this hearing is : what does one do when they are unemployed at 50 and social security and medicare doesn't kick in until 65? 60 minutes also did a segment on the new unemployable: a room full of over 50 er's 85% of the room with ATLEAST 1 Masters degree- that was in Silicone valley. These fears and stories are all over the AARP web site- they are not made up and they are not only nurses but nurses are included also in the mess. From the congressional hearing, it was testified by the Phd who heads the Soc Security Administration- the average income of a social security recipient today is $12,500/yr the majority it is $7,500/yr. Sen Sanders asked"how does a person live on that amount of money/year?" So sorry that this offends to read this. It offends me it's happening.

    Now you've done it! That story just broke my heart!

    It is so sad and even more heart breaking is that poor woman is *not* alone!''

    There are MANY persons >40 recently unemployed and many in the "long term" bracket of the same are those >50.

    Simply put if one looses their job and the closer you are to the big four-0 or worse fifty-0 there is a *very* good chance you'll not find work again easily if at all.

    These are persons in the prime of their careers and that often works as a hinderance. Because of their experience and wage history they are "expensive" versus a young college grad. After healthcare costs are factored in these "older" employees cost more than others.

    Another group of older workers forced to find whatever employment they can find are retirees and others whom have seen their savings dwindle and or were wiped out in the recent financial/credit market upheaval.

    In many of these cases such older persons have children, grandchildren and or other family members looking to them for a touch. Unemployed young college grads are moving back home in record numbers. That drives up the household costs but where does the extra money for the kitty come from. OTHO "old" as some of this population is many have parents who may also be in a bad way economically or at least need some assistance.

    You mark my words, when this economy turns around there are going to be several generations of persons both young and old that may end up being "forgotten" as employers turn to recent college grads to hire.
    kcmylorn and lindarn like this.
  9. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    1
    Quote from Altra
    I'd like to go to something like historymajors.com and see if all the baristas with baccalaureate degrees feel they were "lied to" or if they are about to circulate petitions to various folks or if they feel it's the fault of some corporation or government agency that their degree has not immediately led to meaningful employment.

    I do not understand at all why nurses seem to feel so entitled to secure employment. Health care is largely private enterprise in the US, and it waxes and wanes pretty cyclically, just like every other industry.
    While one does agree with the balance of your post, historically aside from one or two periods it hasn't been *that* difficult to find a nursing gig. You may not have gotten the shift you wanted nor the facility, but there was always something to pick up
    kcmylorn likes this.
  10. Visit  DoGoodThenGo profile page
    1
    Quote from 24newbie
    so discouraging. i am in my early 50's and just applying to some ABSN programs. these posts make me think i'll not get a job. wow!!!
    My standard advice to anyone considering entering nursing is do not expect to have a gig at once after graduation and passing the boards. Indeed there may be periods ranging from a day to a week or longer when you may not have work at all.

    Hospitals are getting very good at "one time staffing" meaning predicting or at least staffing via a blend of census and or acuity. When the work load is light it's time to draw straws to see who is called off. More and more OR's are working to bring in nurses closer to the time they are required rather than by the shift load and waiting for their "show" to start.

    One final bit of advice, take a page from other college majors and whilst in school start building the ground work to appeal to a broad employer market. More and more the nursing hiring process resembles that of the corrporate world. It's becoming about the right "fit" and what can *you* bring to the organization.
    lindarn likes this.
  11. Visit  SingDanaSing profile page
    0
    Quote from DoGoodThenGo
    One final bit of advice, take a page from other college majors and whilst in school start building the ground work to appeal to a broad employer market. More and more the nursing hiring process resembles that of the corrporate world. It's becoming about the right "fit" and what can *you* bring to the organization.
    As a student, how should I go about building the ground work?
  12. Visit  nursel56 profile page
    1
    I'm just surprised at the overall mediocrity of the article. I expected Forbes to associate their name to a thoroughly researched article - not something you would read in Family Circle. But Huffington Post had a series on Sarah Palin's hairstyle, and the newsmagazines are shadows of their former selves, too.

    I don't mind provocative writing so much as I do reading pablum.
    lindarn likes this.
  13. Visit  Quickbeam profile page
    2
    Quote from CrunchRN
    I blame the for profit nursing education industry and also all the faculty nursing instructors who allow the misinformation to continue so that they can keep their jobs.
    I just came back from the Sigma Theta Tau biennial and I agree with you 100%. The upper echelon of academics need and want a huge flow of students through their programs with no regard for employment prospects. I was asked HUNDREDS of times why I didn't have my MSN. "Our program would be so good for you!". Really? I'd make no more money, be out all that tuition and end up back in the same job I'm in now.
    Aviationurse and lindarn like this.
  14. Visit  tothepointeLVN profile page
    1
    You have to remember that in comparison to MANY professions nursing is not doing so badly. I have not had great difficulty in getting work in the last 2 years. Am I getting my dream job. No. Am I getting my dream paycheck. Sort of.

    You have to compare that to the reality of many other non nurses are out there with years of experience with no jobs and have been looking for years.

    I know it's hard for new grads out there but it is understandable that in a down economy that hiring of non experienced personel would stop. I feel for you I really do. It's not your fault and it could have happened to anyone of us on this board but in comparison to other industries nursing looks like a hiring bonanza on paper.
    lindarn likes this.


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