at last, someone studying emotional cost of nursing - page 3

uk: the emotional cost of nursing university of leicester study investigates welfare of nurses issued on 22 june 2009... Read More

  1. by   thatpasunshine
    Quote from apocatastasis
    That'd be interesting, but how would schools go about doing that?

    Nursing is definitely a profession with a high personal cost. As a student starting year 2 of an alternate entry psych NP program... I can say that this past year has burnt my class and me out... we feel like we know nothing but are about to take NCLEX and get thrown into the mix. Most of my classmates are now on SSRIs and/or benzos. :deadhorse

    I always found it helpful when we'd have an instructor say, y'all are super stressed out today and need to chill out, let's do a relaxation exercise. Maybe schools could dedicate 20-30 minutes in a theory course to yoga or something.
    mine actually does. it is one of the first courses you take. and while i was initially skeptical of the whole idea i have to admit that i really learned a lot.
  2. by   nminodob
    Self-care was also one of the first topics we studied at my school too - it was a 4 year degree, so at the time I thought it was just a b.s. course invented for filler. Now that I see the number of burned out nurses I realize there was really something to what they were saying...
    BTW, I liked someone's comment that without teachers there would be no nurses. I feel great pride in my nursing profession, but I also have great admiration for the many teachers who led and encouraged me and others along the way.
  3. by   cgalio01
    I accept the responsibility that I am one of the people who brought up the subject of teachers. My meaning was that the teachers have a union that not only provides them with benefits (health, pension, legal counsel etc) but supports them in that they are not told to counsel fellow teachers, be responsible for anothers actions (because you are the RN), check a fellow teachers work etc. That is what the principal and their assistant is for, and if you don't want that responsiblility you don't become one. Nursing over the years, especially RN's, have been told, not asked, to take on more than nursing. They are the driving force behind all that goes on in the hospitals, rehabs, long term care etc. We find ourselves caught between the patient and the mandates. That is one stressful position. And it is constant. We are not only the healers but also the social worker, the psychiatrist, the communicator, the counselor, the peace maker, I could go on and on. The emotional cost of nursing is staggering and strangling. When will nurses stand together and say NO !!! We are not doing one more thing that is not our job. We pick up for everyone and it is expected behavior. If you say no, you are called on the carpet. So you bite your tongue and do it. Next thing you know it is part of your "job". I am so glad that I will be leaving this profession very soon, I do feel for the young people that go into it. As far as what degree you have, I don't care, the initials behind your name does not make you a better nurse, having a heart :heartbeatand experience does that, and there is no degree that can give you that. We are and will always be our own worse enemies. The cost of nursing is very high both emotionally and physically, I look for the day when nurses stand as one and the benefit will out weigh the "cost". Get smart get a union and not the ANA, they are just useless puppets of the goverment.
  4. by   Kim O'Therapy
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    To me teachers are people who never left school. They just need the cocoon of being in school for the rest of their lives, it's the one thing they are good at and they never moved beyond it.
    Ironically, over the years of my two kids being in school, I have met about five teachers that started out in nursing school, but they struggled so much they had to switch majors. :smackingf A friend of mine taught middle school for 13 years, quit to go to nursing school so she could make "better money". She graduated, did ER for six months and hated it d/t the hours and working weekends and holidays......she is now a school nurse.
  5. by   coffee4metech
    I am not a nurse/ I am nursing student, but a nurse assistant in home care for seniors , and I find myself forgetting myself between work and being a mother and wife. It takes a toll on my emotional health as well as my physical health.
  6. by   leslie :-D
    i would be very curious to see what they will do with the results of this study.
    afterall, we have known (and lived with!) for decades, the emotional/mental sacrifices that nsg has invoked on our souls.

    so, what happens next?
    better staffing?
    more vacation/pto?
    a supportive admin?

    hmmm...that's what i thought.

    leslie
  7. by   Katnip
    Quote from leslie :-D
    i would be very curious to see what they will do with the results of this study.
    afterall, we have known (and lived with!) for decades, the emotional/mental sacrifices that nsg has invoked on our souls.

    so, what happens next?
    better staffing?
    more vacation/pto?
    a supportive admin?

    hmmm...that's what i thought.

    leslie
    Leslie, we'll just have to continue what we've been doing all the while. Limp along as best we can and prop each other up here at Allnurses. And pray we make it through fairly intact to retirement or death, whichever comes first.
  8. by   CanuckStudent
    Quote from FireStarterRN
    Maybe nursing programs should start incorporating self-care into their curriculum? It's a vital part of holistic nursing for the nurse to remain emotionally and physically fit.
    Actually, most schools DO. My 2 year PN (Practical Nursing) diploma program did include 'self-care' as part of a 'Therapeutic Communications for Nurses' course.

    There was a specific chapter devoted to self-care and avoiding burnout. Emotional contagion and self-preservation were addressed.

    Self care issues are also heavily addressed in the Health Promotion and Health Assessment areas of the course.
  9. by   CanuckStudent
    Quote from nminodob
    Self-care was also one of the first topics we studied at my school too - it was a 4 year degree, so at the time I thought it was just a b.s. course invented for filler. Now that I see the number of burned out nurses I realize there was really something to what they were saying...
    BTW, I liked someone's comment that without teachers there would be no nurses. I feel great pride in my nursing profession, but I also have great admiration for the many teachers who led and encouraged me and others along the way.

    No, it still is a useless filler course. As you know, most nursing theory doesn't translate into much once you hit the floor running.

    Nursing is primarily a technical job, always will be. There are exceptions (Patient education, advanced practice, desk job), but if you are a run of the mill general duty nurse, you will be sweating away like a hard labouror.

    The truth is, nursing takes a certain kind of person. You have to have that buring desire to be a nurse. You take the good with the bad, and it doesn't bother you. It's all in a days work. You either love the work or you hate it. There's really no course that you can help you if you hate the field. And most people who burn out quickly fall into that category.

    Physically, eat right (no junk food) and stay in good shape (regular exercise). If you don't do these things, you are going to struglge and feel worse. A healthy mind requires a healthy body, as I'm sure you know. The most unhappiest nurses that I see are the ones who eat donuts and chain smoke all day long. And I wonder why they are complaining that they don't have the energy to get through their shift....

    Try to find a facility that you really 'click' at. If you are a serious minded person, look for those types of people. Try a research position in a lab. If you are bubbly and have a good sense of humor, try the busiest ER in the city. Those nurses and docs usually have the quirkiest sense of humor because those are typically the people who work in the ER. You have to find a way to deal with the horrors that you see, and these are typically the people who cope well.

    My point is that no course can prepare you for the 'real world'. Most nursing students almost **** their pants when they get out onto the floor because the 'nursing theories' they learned in school really mean nothing when it comes to the actual job, and the politics of the job. It's a big wake up call. I think the problem is that nursing schools promote nursing as this noble profession, with dreams of one on one patient time. If nursing schools promoted the reality of nursing from the get go (it's a tough, rough, and full of kinks job), then they'd be less apt to admit people who are going to nursing school for the wrong reasons. In turn this may help the nursing shortage, as nursing schools keep churning out grads who often never stay in the field. There is a reason why nursing schools always have waitlists and yet we are always short nurses. Instead of removing the bottleneck, let's regulate who goes through it and it will sort itself out.

  10. by   CanuckStudent
    Please, can't ALL nurses just respect each other and get along? It's shameful, and that's why people are leaving nursing in droves.
    Last edit by rn/writer on Jun 26, '09 : Reason: Removed referrences to deleted post
  11. by   rn/writer
    This thread has taken several unwelcome detours in its four pages. Several posts about one off-topic subject have been edited or removed. Alas, the other side-trip having to do with teachers is not so easy to deal with. Editing in regard to that subject would leave gaping holes in the thread. Therefore, those posts will be left in place.

    Please, stick to the original subject--the emotional costs of nursing. Further hijacking--and the sparks that usually follow--may result in the thread being closed.

    One of the emotional costs of nursing is the way we go at each other hammer and tongs, when we should be closing ranks and supporting each other in the face of pressure from everyone else.

    Please, be kind, even when you disagree.

    Thanks.
  12. by   nurseinlimbo
    Quote from marylewis73
    HI!
    We are planning a Nursing Tune-up conference this fall for those who wish to learn about all the current and best self care practices for nurses: Reiki, Polarity, meditation, gentle exercise, peer consultation,support groups and lots more. We will have a play back theater group mirroring critical scenarios, which aides in catharsis and moving on, and inspirational speakers. Let's remember: relationships build hope.
    Better yet, why not use the RN title to start a business in holistic care and forget about working at the bedside altogether. As far as someone who said they skip breaks and work OT for free and it makes them a better nurse than someone who can leave it at work, THAT IS COMPLETE BUNK!!!! It is a job, a way to earn a living, yes you need to care, but you don't need to care at the expense of yourself and your family. PUH-LEASE!
  13. by   Roy Fokker
    I hope the research also focuses on the high costs in terms of frustration and/or deep professional dissatisfaction that nurses face from repeatedly encountering the same patients who repeatedly abuse the health care industry with their bogus complaints and non-compliant behavior.

    "Burn out" comes in many ways and forms.

    cheers,

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