Alzheimer's patients get more freedom, less symptoms - page 3

by Flare

5,431 Views | 27 Comments

This is so fascinating. I'd like to hear from those in LTC about how they'd feel putting this into practice: Full Article:... Read More


  1. 3
    I have worked on an ARD unit in ltc, and while I completely agree with these practices in theory, I realize that unless facilities are able to hire on more staff, it simply is often too difficult to make into reality. As much as we want to do everything on the resident's schedule, there are just not enough hands to go around to make it possible. It is such a shame too, because I can honestly tell that these exact types of practices really do make a difference when we are able to implement them!
    Bella'sMyBaby, Jarnaes, and wooh like this.
  2. 0
    Usually I skip these articles, but I'm sitting here thinking to myself "Huh ... Maybe we do need to rethink how we treat dementia patients!"

    I have had a few dementia patients that were of the variety that never settled down ever - the ones that would say, "I want to get up to the chair." (5 minutes later or even RIGHT after the ceiling lift was redocked in the charge port) "I want to go to bed I'm tired!" (repeat). I wonder how that is handled?
  3. 0
    What a wonderful article! Thank you for posting it
  4. 0
    Quote from RNMLIS
    Never happen in for profit LTC
    SAD BUT TRUE
  5. 0
    Well, I must have missed it the first time around but it's in the news again. Yesterday on NPR's On Point, host Tom Ashbrook interviewed Tena Alonzo of Beatitudes.

    There's also an article about Beatitudes in the May 20 edition of New Yorker magazine. I'm a subscriber and see the entire article online, so I'm not sure how much you can see without being a subscriber, but you'll at least get a taste at the link.

    'Nelly
    Last edit by hotflashion on May 17, '13 : Reason: Moved bulk of note elsewhere
  6. 0
    I moved my comment to a new topic in Geriatric nursing.
  7. 0
    We used to buy my Mom chocolates and one snotty nurse got on our case because that's all she ate instead of the "yummy" crappy food they served. Luckily my Mom had an advocate in me and that one nurse was removed from the unit when I told the DON about her attitude and how she agitated my Mom.
  8. 4
    Quote from Poochiewoochie
    We used to buy my Mom chocolates and one snotty nurse got on our case because that's all she ate instead of the "yummy" crappy food they served. Luckily my Mom had an advocate in me and that one nurse was removed from the unit when I told the DON about her attitude and how she agitated my Mom.
    I think it is great that you were such a great advocate for your mother as seen in your posts. Every patient needs an advocate. However, getting a nurse removed from her unit because she said something about her eating chocolates instead of the "crappy" meals sounds a little ridiculous. If this was my patient I might be concerned she's not getting the nutrients she needs. Obviously if she is in a facility she needs real meals for her health and strength along with the chocolate. Maybe that nurse was just trying to be an advocate for her patient. Getting her moved sounds harsh in my opinion.

    As an aside, it's not the nurses fault the food seemed "crappy" to you. Another thing nurses have to deal with. Maybe her calling it yummy was her way to encourage your mother to eat. If you thought it was so crappy maybe you could have brought her some meals with that chocolate.
    Glycerine82, Altra, dudette10, and 1 other like this.


Top