A freeze in the nursing pipeline - Minneapolis Star Tribune (subscription)

  1. a freeze in the nursing pipeline
    [color=#6f6f6f]minneapolis star tribune (subscription), mn - 56 minutes ago
    ... other settings. meanwhile, demand for nurses is growing in nursing homes, assisted living and other senior health care, shreve said. ...

    for years, nurses from the philippines have been coming to the twin cities to fill shortages in nursing homes, but a lack of visas has halted the flow for workers and their families.

    when ivy tejano flew to minneapolis from the philippines in july, she followed in the footsteps of thousands of fellow nurses who fill a critical need in health care in the twin cities and nationwide.
    but that pipeline of foreign nurses, which has provided staff members for senior health facilities across the nation, went dry this month, after a special pool of 50,000 visas for foreign nurses and their families was used up. congress will have to act to add more of these visas before international recruitment can pick up again.

    more... a freeze in the nursing pipeline- minneapolis star tribune
    Last edit by brian on Dec 6, '06
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  2. 16 Comments

  3. by   Hellllllo Nurse
    Good news, since there really is not a nursing shortage at all- per The ANA and the US Dept of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  4. by   Simplepleasures
    Quote from Hellllllo Nurse
    Good news, since there really is not a nursing shortage at all- per The ANA and the US Dept of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics.
    I agree, should the story really read," Nursing Homes and Assisted Livings in Dire Need of Foriegn Nurses Who Will Work CHEAP and Make No Demands" ?
  5. by   Freedom42
    Edited
    Last edit by Freedom42 on Dec 4, '06
  6. by   Gromit
    I recall when my last facility (several years ago) told us that we had best 'cool it' because the nursing shortage was predicted to be over by '06. We kind of laughed at them. Constantly saying it wont make it true. They either want us to believe we aren't in such demand, or they really don't have a clue. Personally, I think its a bit of both. They really don't have a clue, and they're probably scared because the 'gravy' days have been over for a while, and if we actually DID unite as a whole, we would be in the drivers' seat.
  7. by   fiestynurse
    "There's really not a nursing shortage" - Huh? Even though there has been a slight slowing of the shortage over the past few years, the shortage is real and expected to get worse.

    AACN - Media - Nursing Shortage Fact Sheet
  8. by   Gromit
    Like I said. They tried to sell us on the idea that there was no more shortage -a few years ago. We didn't believe them THEN, and wouldn't NOW. As nurses, we are in demand -that puts us in the drivers' seat. What we have to do is actually USE that power, instead of just caving in to whatever the administration wants to give us.
  9. by   slooje
    I agree with what Gromit said. If we let admin treat us like they have in the past, and always talk about "when" nursing finally starts acting like one instead of acting on this, nothing is going to change. The shortage is real and only going to get worse. If nursing wants to change its image, the time is now.
  10. by   Freedom42
    Quote from fiestynurse
    "There's really not a nursing shortage" - Huh? Even though there has been a slight slowing of the shortage over the past few years, the shortage is real and expected to get worse.

    AACN - Media - Nursing Shortage Fact Sheet
    If you read that fact sheet, it points out that burnout and shoddy working conditions are driving nurses out of the profession. Bad working conditions have also been cited by the U.S. Department of Labor and the ANA as a factor behind the shortage. If even half of the registered nurses who are still licensed in this country but who are not working would take a job right now, there wouldn't be a shortage.

    Many believe there is not a shortage of nurses but a shortage of nurses willing to work for relatively low pay in poor conditions. The point that's being made here is that as long as the health-care industry is allowed to turn to turn to foreign countries for nurses, wages will remain suppressed and conditions will not improve. Ask anyone who's seen his job outsourced overseas. As long as there's someone willing to do your job for less, that's who the employer will hire.

    What's infuriating about the Minneapolis Star article is that the reporter didn't ask any U.S. nurses why they won't take these jobs or challenge any of the assertions that were made by the health-care industry; e.g., How much does it cost to bring a nurse from overas, feed her, house her, pay for her to study for the licensing exam, then put her on the job? And how much does that cost compared to hiring a local nurse?

    My hunch is that it actually costs more to hire the foreign nurse in the short term -- but it's surely cheaper in the long run if she won't question her compensation and will take what is offered, no matter how bad.
  11. by   lindarn
    Quote from Freedom42
    If you read that fact sheet, it points out that burnout and shoddy working conditions are driving nurses out of the profession. Bad working conditions have also been cited by the U.S. Department of Labor and the ANA as a factor behind the shortage. If even half of the registered nurses who are still licensed in this country but who are not working would take a job right now, there wouldn't be a shortage.

    Many believe there is not a shortage of nurses but a shortage of nurses willing to work for relatively low pay in poor conditions. The point that's being made here is that as long as the health-care industry is allowed to turn to turn to foreign countries for nurses, wages will remain suppressed and conditions will not improve. Ask anyone who's seen his job outsourced overseas. As long as there's someone willing to do your job for less, that's who the employer will hire.

    What's infuriating about the Minneapolis Star article is that the reporter didn't ask any U.S. nurses why they won't take these jobs or challenge any of the assertions that were made by the health-care industry; e.g., How much does it cost to bring a nurse from overas, feed her, house her, pay for her to study for the licensing exam, then put her on the job? And how much does that cost compared to hiring a local nurse?

    My hunch is that it actually costs more to hire the foreign nurse in the short term -- but it's surely cheaper in the long run if she won't question her compensation and will take what is offered, no matter how bad.
    Is there any reason that you, or other informed, but fed up nurses, couldn't write a letter to the editor, or a guest editorial, and inform the public, and the paper, for that matter, what the facts are? I do believe that we have freedom of speech.

    When I wrote some nasty lettors to the editor several years ago with issues like this, the paper told me to call them if I had to face any retaliation, or disciplinay actions over them. Most of the papers will write stuff if you give them an informed opinion/information. I did call an attorney that I knew, just in case. He also wanted to know if I got any grief over it. JMHO.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    Last edit by lindarn on Jan 4, '07
  12. by   Freedom42
    Right on, Lindarn. I wrote a letter to the Star Tribune on Dec. 3, copying both the reporter and the editor. So far, no reply.
  13. by   Sheri257
    I agree that in this case, there is no shortage because it's always the same story.

    In my area, the hospitals that have the lowest pay are the ones that hire the most foreign nurses, because they can't attract U.S. nurses with that low pay. But, the U.S. Labor Department says that low pay is "market wage" when, in fact, it's not.

    Until the Labor Dept. starts setting real market wages for foreign nurses .... I will not support additional visas. This is just a way to undercut wages for U.S. nurses ... plain and simple.

    :typing
  14. by   dexter99
    I guess there are still nursing shortages in other states but in NY hell no... There are a LOT of nurses here... I'm having difficulty getting in a hospital and I feel that my only choice is LTC... Which is not my utmost desire... I love to train in a hospital and develop skills.. What will I learn in LTC? Giving out meds? But what choice do I got I need a job...

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