81 year old nurse still working strong! - page 5

by RN2B123 | 22,852 Views | 116 Comments

Cute article about an 81 year old nurse...probably runs circles around the others haha. Im gonna be retired on a beach with a pina colada at that age!... Read More


  1. 7
    Quote from Pappilli0n
    This is a strange story, indeed. Two reasons come to mind. First and probably foremost is why can't this woman live on her Social Security (started to work, when?) and her nursing pension (25 years accumulation)? Since I don't plan to live 'til 100 I think I'll be okay on mine.,,,,approx 40 yrs Social Security and 20 years nursing pension.
    Second reason probably should be a discussion of her age and how the body ages, blah, blah, blah. NOPE, that's not it. There's more to this story I'm sure. And that is, giving this woman her rights AND being POLITICALLY CORRECT. She apparently is enjoying her rights but I don't understand how a hospital management can continue to say that she measures up to the qualifications, mental, physical and psychological that are
    requirements of any nurse to sustain her duties. Being polite and nice to someone because she is older and no doubt very sweet and very much wanting to prove her abilities is not in the good of the patients she is caring for.
    Having worked around a few older patients as probably most every nurse has, I'm sure we've all talked with them and picked up on the little physical and mental discrepancies that show up in a good evaluation and assessment of just where they are on a scale of 1 to 10. I would never put someone down whom I know in their heart of hearts believe they're a 10, when in fact, they're barely a 7 or 8. Nursing requires the 10 or for real a high 9.

    Here's another small detail we must entertain. Besides nursing being difficult it also can become quite repetitious and downright boring. THEREFORE goes ones determination and interest in meeting new challenges of one's job.



    Nurses are certainly a skeptic sort, huh? If this woman has preserved herself and continued working all of these years there is nothing to suggest that she has decreased mental acuity simply because of her age. We all know that "if you dont use it, you lose it", and its apparent that she's been using it! Advanced age does not in any way mean that a person is any less bright, and you certainly cant take anyones education and experiences from them. Getting older just makes you slower, but she can come to the same conclusions as you or I. All nurses need help, whether its lifting that heavy patient or whether its borrowing a bit of someone else's expertise, so I am sure she's able to get help on her unit when she needs it (because this is what nurses should be doint for one another anyway). Hats off to this woman!

    She probably cannot live on her social security. She has worked as a waitress most of her life and has been nursing for about 20 years. Waitresses do not typically accrue enough social security to actually live on (they make 3 bucks an hour now, can you imagine how much they made in her heyday??). As far as her nursing career, if people were able to retire after working just 20 years, I imagine that we'd have a lot more retired people in this world! She got a late start in life as far as her career and she's making up for lost time!

    JMO...
  2. 4
    Quote from Pappilli0n
    ...Here's another small detail we must entertain. Besides nursing being difficult it also can become quite repetitious and downright boring. THEREFORE goes ones determination and interest in meeting new challenges of one's job.
    In more than 30 years of nursing I have never considered it repetitious or boring. I have certainly experienced the less than challenging shift or assignment or case, but as a whole this profession and career have been far from boring. As nurses we do occasionally have some repetitious "tasks". Fortunately, our duties require much, much more than just completion of tasks.
    Purple_Scrubs, NaKcl, talaxandra, and 1 other like this.
  3. 0
    81? that's something... I can't imagine myself working at that age. i don't even know if i can reach 60!
  4. 0
    To think that I will have to work as a nurse until I am on my death bead doesn't thrill me. Maybe one of those 400 + pound patients will give a stroke turning and rolling them and take care of the situation for me! Certainly the boss doesn't understand the danger in doing that over a 12 hour period!!
  5. 3
    During clinicals, I was paired with a nurse who said she was in her 70s but could well be older than she stated. I didn't really see any problems from working with her. She managed to deal with a full patient load on the med-surg unit well enough. Even with the computer, she didn't seem to have any trouble. But still, if in such a position, I would rather take myself out than have to work until I code on the floor. But I am working to be in a different area of nursing by the time I have enough experience under my belt. One that is not so stressful as floor nursing can be.
    looking for work, Fiona59, and KSRN2b like this.
  6. 2
    We have a 76yo still working in my hospital. Let's leave it at we can't get staff to float in and work on a shift with her when they find out they will be working for her. She doesn't do patient care but charges. No meds, no dressings, no call bells. She walks with a limp and doesn't lift or turn patients. She's hard of hearing and doesn't wear an aide. Patients have complained about her "attitude".

    When that unit is staffed with only two nurses on certain shifts, it's hell on earth working with her. The floats have all complained to the unit manager. The unit manager is worried about an age discrimination case or a union grievance. It's like she's buried her head in the sand hoping she'll retire soon (more chance of the manager retiring first).

    She has our government pension, her nurses pension and a regular paycheque. She pays a load of tax, frequently heard to complain about it.

    I just hope that I have more interests in my life than work and taxes if I reach my 70s.
    looking for work and KSRN2b like this.
  7. 14
    Quote from MulticollinearityRN
    We have an RN who is 68. He is very slow, and he makes a lot of minor mistakes. Nothing major like medication errors. We are careful to schedule him when he's always with another RN and not alone on duty. He cannot handle being the only RN on duty well. He cannot physically run to emergencies on our massive campus carrying our "code bag," and he gets flustered sometimes, but generally does OK.

    I see no problem with some accommodations like this for an older worker who is slow, but tries. (I am not saying all older workers are slow.)

    I'd like others to be a bit gentle and help me out if I'm working when I'm that old.

    Did you know him when he was younger? Maybe he was always that way.

    I bet I could name quite a few young or younger nurses that are slow, make a lot of minor mistakes, and get flustered, as well as not being able to run to emergencies, (not from age, from size).
    HazelLPN, pedicurn, DizzyLizzyNurse, and 11 others like this.
  8. 4
    Over 20 years in, I still love working the floor. I'm in my early forties, and really like the idea that I'll still be physically and mentally fit enoght to work forty years from now.

    But ten years ago I worked with a nurse who had to come back after retiring, because a combination of bad investment (a rental apartment bought when interest rates were ridiculous, that had to be sold for less than it's original price when repayments couldn't be made) and a gambling habit meant she ate through her savings in under six months. She was burnt out long before her original retirement but had nothing else she could do. Inspired by her, I went back to school - if or when I start enjoying work less, I have an alternative career to pursue.

    Oh, and when I had a hopefully-midlife-I'll-live-past-80 crisis I diversified my investments, increased my superannuation contributions, and started spending my money more wisely.
    looking for work, Altra, Fiona59, and 1 other like this.
  9. 4
    Quote from Pappilli0n
    This is a strange story, indeed. Two reasons come to mind. First and probably foremost is why can't this woman live on her Social Security (started to work, when?) and her nursing pension (25 years accumulation)? Since I don't plan to live 'til 100 I think I'll be okay on mine.,,,,approx 40 yrs Social Security and 20 years nursing pension.
    Second reason probably should be a discussion of her age and how the body ages, blah, blah, blah. NOPE, that's not it. There's more to this story I'm sure. And that is, giving this woman her rights AND being POLITICALLY CORRECT. She apparently is enjoying her rights but I don't understand how a hospital management can continue to say that she measures up to the qualifications, mental, physical and psychological that are
    requirements of any nurse to sustain her duties. Being polite and nice to someone because she is older and no doubt very sweet and very much wanting to prove her abilities is not in the good of the patients she is caring for.
    Having worked around a few older patients as probably most every nurse has, I'm sure we've all talked with them and picked up on the little physical and mental discrepancies that show up in a good evaluation and assessment of just where they are on a scale of 1 to 10. I would never put someone down whom I know in their heart of hearts believe they're a 10, when in fact, they're barely a 7 or 8. Nursing requires the 10 or for real a high 9.

    Here's another small detail we must entertain. Besides nursing being difficult it also can become quite repetitious and downright boring. THEREFORE goes ones determination and interest in meeting new challenges of one's job.
    Social Security is *not* a pension scheme. You pay into it and then when your time comes to draw benefits a formuala is used to determine how much you will receive. IIRC they take one's several highest earning years and work from there. For woman in the OP's situation, born, rasied and worked when women were paid low wages (and that goes for nurses), there isn't going to be much in the SS kitty. Then there is the age old situation for all females, leaving the workforce to marry and and or raise children. To make up for those years a married woman can tap into her husband's benefits, but there again the same caculations apply. If the man didn't earn that much over his working lifetime there may not be that much of a difference between what a wife (or ex-wife) will get versus her own.

    The average SS benefit today is around $800 to 1,500 per month, IIRC. That is not enough to live on for many persons if that is their only source of retirement income. Without savings and or pension schemes many on SS are in or near ruin. There are many older persons in my area (NYC) who are seen daily rummaging through trash cans for the empties to return for deposit refund, or anything else they can find of value to sell/redeem to bring in extra funds.

    To retire today you need about 75% of your current income, perhaps more. We are living longer and that means there is a good chance while one may live to be 80 or 90 you will also have Alzheimer's, a degenerative disease, chronic long term illness and so forth that will prevent one from working. Cost of LTC is *not* cheap, and the longer you live there is a good chance you will outlive your assets.

    Indeed the last point is becoming a huge worry for many near or at retirement today. Between poor planning (or no planning at all), the recent financial crisis, the housing crash and whole host of other reasons persons are finding the cupboard is bare.

    Miss. Suzie Orman has a great new book and is making the rounds on PBS stations talking about the "New Financial America". Strongly urge people to at least see the PBS show if not read the book.

    As for planning on SS to live on in one's retirement, the word on "the street" is don't.
    Otessa, pedicurn, SKM-NURSIEPOOH, and 1 other like this.
  10. 1
    "nursing pension"???? Where do you get a nursing pension??? I want to work there!!!!!!
    KSRN2b likes this.


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