50,000 visas for foreign nurses! Is this really a good thing for us Americans? - page 11

I just read about these new immigration laws passed in the senate and I'm wondering what the changes will mean for us Americans as far as finding and keeping a job goes. I don't have anything... Read More

  1. by   suzanne4
    Unfortunately, many facilities deal with unscrupulous agencies that make promises that they can't keep to the hospital, as well as the nurse. They are interested in the number of bodies that they can place, not what the nurse can do. They only get paid by numbers, nothing else..........

    The latest contracts that I have seen have promised a green card in four months on one, and six months on the other..................
    Three year contract........Also, a $15,000 penalty if they try to cancel the contract or the facility cancels them...........

    And now with the retrogression still in place, there are offers of working as a nurse assistant for $7..........for three years but with promise again of green card within six months..............and you can be in the US in just three months.

    You also have to put the blame on these agencies that take advantage of people.
  2. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Well with recruitment situations like that, anyone can see what some of us are so awfully concerned about!!!! I think every place doing things like the University Of Virginia is, should be publically shamed. This confirms my worst feelings and fears about mass foreign recruitment. I am not just an alarmist; this stuff is already happening.
  3. by   jeriz
    Well, life should not depart from us. I think the main reason why America is now experiencing shortage of nurses is because they have lost life and I mean they never enjoyed being a nurse. As a nurse from the Philippines, nursing is not just a job, it is my life. And the reason i desire to work there is to be more competent in dealing with patients with varied cultural backgrounds and give nursing the real essence of service that Americans have lost. You see, not all Filipino nurses would like to go there just for the "better life" as ours, in my point of view, is a lot better. But we desire to expand our horizons and that should not be a cause for so much fuss. More than the technology that you guys are saying, nursing is more than being updated with what is going on. It is a commitment to do our patient good and making a difference in their stay with us. For me, that is what every nurse should focus on. We should share experiences and show care and concern for our co-nurses whether they be from our country or not. And that will bring back the life in us.
  4. by   Tweety
    Quote from roxannekkb
    Yes, Tweety, it was the University of Virginia is Charlottesville. They had something like 200 applicants from American nurses but said none were "qualified." Then they hired foreign nurses, paying about $18,000 a head for each one. The foreign nurses are "theirs" for a two or three year contract. At the same time, they lowered the per diem pay, and several nurses quit and were in the process of resigning. So what exactly, is going on here? Nursing shortage? Hardly. More like a ploy to cut pay and replace Americans with foreigners who are bound to them by a contract for several years, and who are unlikely to complain about pay, assignments, mandatory overtime, etc.

    I rest my case!
  5. by   Marie_LPN, RN
    Quote from roxannekkb
    Yes, Tweety, it was the University of Virginia is Charlottesville. They had something like 200 applicants from American nurses but said none were "qualified." Then they hired foreign nurses, paying about $18,000 a head for each one. The foreign nurses are "theirs" for a two or three year contract. At the same time, they lowered the per diem pay, and several nurses quit and were in the process of resigning. So what exactly, is going on here? Nursing shortage? Hardly. More like a ploy to cut pay and replace Americans with foreigners who are bound to them by a contract for several years, and who are unlikely to complain about pay, assignments, mandatory overtime, etc.
    Thank you, that's exactly what the problem was/is.
  6. by   Sheri257
    Quote from roxannekkb
    Yes, Tweety, it was the University of Virginia is Charlottesville. They had something like 200 applicants from American nurses but said none were "qualified." Then they hired foreign nurses, paying about $18,000 a head for each one. The foreign nurses are "theirs" for a two or three year contract. At the same time, they lowered the per diem pay, and several nurses quit and were in the process of resigning. So what exactly, is going on here? Nursing shortage? Hardly. More like a ploy to cut pay and replace Americans with foreigners who are bound to them by a contract for several years, and who are unlikely to complain about pay, assignments, mandatory overtime, etc.
    I'm sure that this type of situation happens, although it would be interesting to see what happens when those two to three year contracts are up. For example, consider this post ...

    Quote from snowfreeze
    All the phillipino nurses who have come here to Mars PA are going to california after their contract is done.
    This is a classic case of foreign nurses demanding better wages and working conditions once they get here. Foreign nurses may initially work for cheap ... but that doesn't mean they work for cheap forever.

    Besides, you can't work for cheap in California. The cost of living is too high.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on May 11, '05
  7. by   madwife2002
    Quote from Tweety
    I rest my case!

    Hey Miss, are you stealing my words lol
  8. by   madwife2002
    Quote from snowfreeze
    All the phillipino nurses who have come here to Mars PA are going to california after their contract is done. Good luck to them, they think that a well staffed LTC facility is bad, wait till they hit the hospitals they dream of. Yes California has mandated a nurse patient ratio but the responsibility has increased too I am sure.
    Only one was a really awesome nurse and I gave her an equally awesome reference to attend anesthesia class in california. The rest are mediocre and I am usually glad to see their contract end as they have no motivation.
    We have nurses who's sole purpose is to come to the UK to get to USA, can you imagine that"!!! Kind of a backdoor in I presume :
  9. by   madwife2002
    Quote from roxannekkb
    Yes, Tweety, it was the University of Virginia is Charlottesville. They had something like 200 applicants from American nurses but said none were "qualified." Then they hired foreign nurses, paying about $18,000 a head for each one. The foreign nurses are "theirs" for a two or three year contract. At the same time, they lowered the per diem pay, and several nurses quit and were in the process of resigning. So what exactly, is going on here? Nursing shortage? Hardly. More like a ploy to cut pay and replace Americans with foreigners who are bound to them by a contract for several years, and who are unlikely to complain about pay, assignments, mandatory overtime, etc.

    No wonder you all get p****ed of that is absolutly disgusting-how on earth can this be allowed to go on? Is there not laws protecting nurses in the work place. ?
  10. by   letina
    Quote from madwife2002
    We have nurses who's sole purpose is to come to the UK to get to USA, can you imagine that"!!! Kind of a backdoor in I presume :
    Yes and this makes us kinda feel like "the poor relation" sometimes. As Kay says, we orientate thousands of foreign-educated nurses every year, the NHS spends a lot of its resources precepting, then they come over to you guys. Not that I blame them, heck, I'm on my way over to the US myself. But I feel no guilt leaving nursing in the UK, I've given 27 years service and now it's time to move on.
    Tina
  11. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from lizz
    I'm sure that this type of situation happens, although it would be interesting to see what happens when those two to three year contracts are up. For example, consider this post ...



    Besides, you can't work for cheap in California. The cost of living is too high.

    The point is, they were recruited using less than ethical means. They treated them like serfs! And American workers, who were qualified AND applied, were turned away in favor of taking in these international recruits.


    And, I hate to disagree but: Apparently, you "can work for cheap in California"---- look at other jobs such as field labor or McDonald's. I know, these are largely unskilled, so that is not exactly the same thing But my point is: The whole face of nursing in America could be changed if this sort of practice were to be taken up and commonly used by many more facilities. Don't you think big business would LOVE to get nursing "for cheaper" if they can? This would be opening the door to doing that, in the long run, as I see it.
    Last edit by SmilingBluEyes on May 11, '05
  12. by   Sheri257
    Quote from SmilingBluEyes
    The point is, they were recruited using less than ethical means. They treated them like serfs! And American workers, who were qualified AND applied, were turned away in favor of taking in these international recruits.


    And, I hate to disagree but: Apparently, you "can work for cheap in California"---- look at other jobs such as field labor or McDonald's. I know, these are largely unskilled, so that is not exactly the same thing But my point is: The whole face of nursing in America could be changed if this sort of practice were to be taken up and commonly used by many more facilities. Don't you think big business would LOVE to get nursing "for cheaper" if they can? This would be opening the door to doing that, in the long run, as I see it.
    Perhaps I should have said ... you can't live decently in California for cheap. If you're an illegal migrant worker, and willing to shack up with a dozen other people in a one room apartment then, I guess you can live cheaply ... but I haven't heard of foreign nurses doing that.

    Of course hospitals want cheap labor. And I'm not saying that I agree with the practice. What I am saying is that I seriously doubt foreign nurses put up with it for long. They want better pay and working conditions, just like anybody else.

    That's why I referred to the post talking about foreign nurses moving to California. Even the foreign nurses who come here first frequently change jobs for better pay, benefits, etc.

    If there was a nursing surplus, then yes, I would agree there is a danger. And that may be true in markets like Charlottesville which, if I recall correctly, is a small university town in a rural area with, perhaps, fewer job options.

    But in places where the nursing shortage is acute, and only going to get worse, I don't think there's much of a danger at all, mostly because the employers can't get away with it for very long. But in places where the nursing shortage is acute, and only going to get worse, I don't think there's much of a danger at all, mostly because the employers can't get away with it for very long. Unless they sign these foreign nurses to ten year contracts or something like that (which I've never heard of) the foreign nurses leave for greener pastures, just like American nurses do.

    Last edit by Sheri257 on May 11, '05
  13. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Quote from lizz
    Perhaps I should have said ... you can't live decently in California for cheap. If you're an illegal migrant worker, and willing to shack up with a dozen other people in a one room apartment then, I guess you can live cheaply ... but I haven't heard of foreign nurses doing that.

    Of course hospitals want cheap labor. And I'm not saying that I agree with the practice. What I am saying is that I seriously doubt foreign nurses put up with it for long. They want better pay and working conditions, just like anybody else.

    That's why I referred to the post talking about foreign nurses moving to California. Even the foreign nurses who come here first frequently change jobs for better pay, benefits, etc.

    If there was a nursing surplus, then yes, I would agree there is a danger. And that may be true in markets like Charlottesville which, if I recall correctly, is a small university town in a rural area with, perhaps, fewer job options.

    But in places where the nursing shortage is acute, and only going to get worse, I don't think there's much of a danger at all, mostly because the employers can't get away with it for very long. Unless they sign these foreign nurses to ten year contracts or something like that (which I've never heard of) the foreign nurses leave for greener pastures, just like American nurses do.

    from your lips........

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