2 hospitals to drop licensed practical nurses - page 35

the changes at mercy and unity hospitals are meant to improve care, but unions say the remaining nurses will be stretched too thin. all 90 licensed practical nursing jobs at mercy and unity... Read More

  1. by   pedinurse05
    Quote from countrygirl12
    Ya know, LPN's will be missed for sure. We do alot of work, RN's are good, but LPN's are also good. An LPN can do just as much as an RN. I can't believe someone who wants to rid us as LPN's.

    countrygirl on GA I'm an LPN
    I love LPN's too--I was one for 10 years! I don't think they do as much as RN's nor do I think they should. If LPN's can/do as much as the RN then why would we even have RN's???? I would have rather gone a year than 3 to be where I am. No LPN's shouldn't be gone but they aren't equal to the RN. I used to think I was in the same role until I began working as an RN. This isn't meant to offend because LPN's are valuable but they are not RN's.
  2. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from pedinurse05
    I love LPN's too--I was one for 10 years! I don't think they do as much as RN's nor do I think they should. If LPN's can/do as much as the RN then why would we even have RN's???? I would have rather gone a year than 3 to be where I am. No LPN's shouldn't be gone but they aren't equal to the RN. I used to think I was in the same role until I began working as an RN. This isn't meant to offend because LPN's are valuable but they are not RN's.
    Unless you've gone the route of LPN to RN, a lot of LPNs (not all) do not understand this. Also having gone this route myself, also thinking the role was the same or almost the same, and then learning differently. I'm also very much against LPNs being replaced by UAPs, especially since I now work in a facility where this has happened.
  3. by   pedinurse05
    Quote from DusktilDawn
    Unless you've gone the route of LPN to RN, a lot of LPNs (not all) do not understand this. Also having gone this route myself, also thinking the role was the same or almost the same, and then learning differently. I'm also very much against LPNs being replaced by UAPs, especially since I now work in a facility where this has happened.
    Yes, going from LPN to RN showed me the differences. You are right that there are also many similarities. In no way should LPN's be replaced by UAP's!!!! To replace professionals with someone who has no professional license is sub-quality delivery of care. LPN's are licensed nurses that have a vast knowledge base...what is the healthcare system coming to????
  4. by   DusktilDawn
    Quote from pedinurse05
    Yes, going from LPN to RN showed me the differences. You are right that there are also many similarities. In no way should LPN's be replaced by UAP's!!!! To replace professionals with someone who has no professional license is sub-quality delivery of care. LPN's are licensed nurses that have a vast knowledge base...what is the healthcare system coming to????
    Unfortunately LPNs had been phased out prior to my working at my current facility.
    I had previously worked in a facility that had LPNs/RPNs and RNs providing patient care. CNAs certainly would have been asset here.

    Phasing out LPNs and replacing them with CNAs or other UAPs is not an answer. CNAs and UAPs have a valuable role in providing patient care but it should not be as a replacement for LPNs. This seems to be becoming a dangerous trend in health care.
  5. by   lwd338
    Wow Bamabound I would say that to loud where I work!!! We have awsome CNA's where would you be without them??/ OHHH thats right you can do it all your an RN!!!
  6. by   BamaBound2bRN
    Quote from lwd338
    Wow Bamabound I would say that to loud where I work!!! We have awsome CNA's where would you be without them??/ OHHH thats right you can do it all your an RN!!!

    Sorry you misunderstood my tone- I am in no way disrespecting CNA's, quite the opposite. I have great respect for people who do the jobs that most of us would never consider (ie, CNA, Janitor, Garbage-Men/Women, etc.). I was poking fun at the elitist who think their license makes them superior or something.
  7. by   lindarn
    Quote from BamaBound2bRN
    Sorry you misunderstood my tone- I am in no way disrespecting CNA's, quite the opposite. I have great respect for people who do the jobs that most of us would never consider (ie, CNA, Janitor, Garbage-Men/Women, etc.). I was poking fun at the elitist who think their license makes them superior or something.
    Excuse me, but having a license and a higher level of education makes you more responsible and accountable for your actions, and the actions of those who you delegate to. It is "elitist" for lesser educated individuals to poke fun of an individual who has earned a higher level of education, and specialty certifications that are maintained at their own expense. This concept/problem that is so prevalent in nursing. Those who do and achieve, are looked down at with disdain, by the ones who don't care to, or make excuses for their own lack of ambition or initiative, to improve themselves. That is their way of validating their self worth and self importance. It is the downfall of the nursng profession.

    Other health care career fields are admired for their committment to higher education, while those of us in nursing who also are committed to higher/improved education levels are poked fun of and called, "elitist".

    Just for the record, a higher level LICENSURE is superior to a lower level of licensure. It is not the person, it is the license. The higher level of licensure is a statutatorily superiority, and that comes with a higher level of responsibility AND accountablity. Also called the Nurse Practice Act. It is the statutory law that makes a higher level of licensure superior to an lower level. Therfore, if you feel inferior to an RN because you are an LPN/LVN/CNA, you have the choice to remain an LPN/LVN/CNA, or take advantage of the "LPN/LVN Completer" programs, and become and RN. Or go through an RN program. It is that simple. Then you can have all of the responsiblity and accountability that the RNs over you now have. And you will know how being an RN differs from being an LPN/LVN/CNA. This is also called, you don't know what you don't know, because you don't know. It is not superiority, it is education, knowledge, responsiblity, and accountablility.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
  8. by   RN34TX
    Quote from lindarn
    Therfore, if you feel inferior to an RN because you are an LPN/LVN/CNA, you have the choice to remain an LPN/LVN/CNA, or take advantage of the "LPN/LVN Completer" programs, and become and RN. Or go through an RN program. It is that simple.
    I agree with your comments about nursing being notorious for putting each other down when someone tries to better themselves and "move up" so to speak.
    Some of my CNA co-workers, who had been CNA's for 20+ years, had no problem trying to cut me down for going to LPN school.
    I had some LPN's and RN's give me the "why bother going back to school" rhetoric when I was an LPN trying to get my RN, simply because they became disenchanted and discouraged by the paths their own careers were taking, and I'm thinking they were disturbed to see me moving up, while they remained in their current positions.

    I hear the same even more so now that I am an RN, trying to met my BSN. "Why bother, the pay is the same for BSN's, etc."
    It can be discouraging at times.

    But I must disagree with your "It is that simple" remark when it comes to getting people what you consider to be up to par with nursing education.

    Sure, RN to BSN completion programs have come along way, and it is more possible than ever to obtain one with the flexible options available to RN's.

    But CNA's and LPN's trying to become RN's is not so simple.
    Many barriers and brick walls exist, from mile long waiting lists, to the refusal of schools to accept credit for prior education, experience, and training.
    Some RN programs that I looked into wanted me to start over, as an LPN, from the beginning giving baths and demonstrating foley insertions.
    Now that's insane and a waste of time and money for all involved.

    Some of the so-called "LPN to RN" transition programs end up being almost or just as long as a lay person or CNA who completes the same program to become an RN.

    If we want everyone to become BSN RN's, then we need to stop giving LPN's excuses as to why it's going to be 4 years before they can even start their RN programs or excuses as to why their prior programs will be receiving little if any decent recognition for transfer.

    We need to start opening doors of opportunity to those who already have some demonstrated background and ability to become RN's and BSN's and stop clogging the system with people who not yet even touched a patient but keep the wait lists long.
  9. by   chadash
    Quote from lindarn
    Excuse me, but having a license and a higher level of education makes you more responsible and accountable for your actions, and the actions of those who you delegate to. It is "elitist" for lesser educated individuals to poke fun of an individual who has earned a higher level of education, and specialty certifications that are maintained at their own expense. This concept/problem that is so prevalent in nursing. Those who do and achieve, are looked down at with disdain, by the ones who don't care to, or make excuses for their own lack of ambition or initiative, to improve themselves. That is their way of validating their self worth and self importance. It is the downfall of the nursng profession.

    Other health care career fields are admired for their committment to higher education, while those of us in nursing who also are committed to higher/improved education levels are poked fun of and called, "elitist".

    Just for the record, a higher level LICENSURE is superior to a lower level of licensure. It is not the person, it is the license. The higher level of licensure is a statutatorily superiority, and that comes with a higher level of responsibility AND accountablity. Also called the Nurse Practice Act. It is the statutory law that makes a higher level of licensure superior to an lower level. Therfore, if you feel inferior to an RN because you are an LPN/LVN/CNA, you have the choice to remain an LPN/LVN/CNA, or take advantage of the "LPN/LVN Completer" programs, and become and RN. Or go through an RN program. It is that simple. Then you can have all of the responsiblity and accountability that the RNs over you now have. And you will know how being an RN differs from being an LPN/LVN/CNA. This is also called, you don't know what you don't know, because you don't know. It is not superiority, it is education, knowledge, responsiblity, and accountablility.

    Lindarn, RN, BSN, CCRN
    Spokane, Washington
    I really agree with your assertion that a higher level of licensure is superior to a lower, in that with more knowledge and education comes a more skilled, well reasoned provider of healthcare. I hope I have not unwittingly implied that I look down on those of you who have made great effort, and even sacrifice to further your education, to provide the very best for our patients. I am trully impressed with you all!
    I have remained a "career" CNA, though, not because I did not want to make the effort, or I am unwilling to make the sacrifice. I love hard work. You never really know someones full story, you know? Sometimes there is more involved than meets the eye.
    We all play a necessary role in that one good thing we do: care for our patients. You do good!
    Last edit by chadash on Mar 16, '06

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