2 hospitals to drop licensed practical nurses - page 19

the changes at mercy and unity hospitals are meant to improve care, but unions say the remaining nurses will be stretched too thin. all 90 licensed practical nursing jobs at mercy and unity... Read More

  1. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from TheCommuter
    1. LindaRN = Washington State
    2. Q = The Great Lakes Region

    The recent BSN graduate from Chicago would be the only notable exception, but she's not too far from the Strep Belt.
    that isssssss very interesting, but too small of a sample.
  2. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from asoldierswife05
    that isssssss very interesting, but too small of a sample.
    That's true. They would probably flame me for pointing out their geographic region.
  3. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from TheCommuter
    That's true. They would probably flame me for pointing out their geographic region.
    not to mention there are poster's like me who do not show their location , but just for the info, I live in the deep southern US
  4. by   oramar
    We need more LPNs not less. I work in a place that has eliminated LPNs in acute areas and I really miss them.
  5. by   Q.
    Quote from TheCommuter
    1. LindaRN = Washington State
    2. Q = The Great Lakes Region

    The recent BSN graduate from Chicago would be the only notable exception, but she's not too far from the Strep Belt.
    Interesting observation, with just two individuals, however what I find more interesting is that because I haven't given an opinion on the elimination of LPNs in this particular thread, I am therefore somehow assumed to have made degrading comments.

    What's also interesting is you have no idea where in the Great Lakes I reside. Chicago is also on Lake Michigan, which is a Great Lake, which does not fall into your geographical map of the "strep belt."

    I have never made a degrading comment and I am resentful of the fact that this statement is being made/presented as fact. My posts have all merely called foul when an ADN/LPN nurse (or otherwise) in an effort to defend him/herself has in fact, degraded administrative nurses or advanced degreed nurses. Because I call this out does not mean I disrespect LPNs/ADNs. That is not a logical conclusion.

    In fact, if you had read any of my posts from previous threads you will see that I have made THESE comments:

    I am a proponent of BSN entry into the profession NOT because I think that ADNs aren't great nurses. The ONE nurse that I respect the MOST, my clinical idol, the one I nominated for a nursing award, the one who's charge style is what I model myself after, the one who I always said if I were in labor and in trouble, would want HER to take care of me (and who did, when I was in preterm labor at 25 weeks and thereafter) is an ADN nurse. I love and admire her to death.

    For me, the BSN argument isn't about who's better, it's about establishing one unified standard that defines us. It's about having ONE point to entry to eliminate confusion and in-fighting. It's about eliminating the bickering of who had more clinical hours because nursing education at University B and nursing education at University C would be identical.
    From the following thread:
    http://allnurses.com/forums/f195/nur...-128121-4.html


    Granted that thread in particular was about ADNs and not LPNs, but I think the point is clear.
    I worked with an LPN once in my career; at an ambulatory clinic and we worked as team in telephone triage. She is my best friend and mentor and since she had at least 32 years experience on me, I consulted her for many issues which I was not familiar or skilled. She was an excellent nurse. But that does not mean that I don't see the value in eliminating all the different scopes of practice for nursing and having onepoint of entry and one type of nurse. And because I feel this way does not mean that I think, JaneLPN/ADN, personally, is a horrible nurse and useless. I just personally think she should have a different title and different scope of practice.
    Last edit by Q. on Dec 14, '05
  6. by   nurse4theplanet
    Quote from Q.
    I worked with an LPN once in my career; at an ambulatory clinic and we worked as team in telephone triage. She is my best friend and mentor and since she had at least 32 years experience on me, I consulted her for many issues which I was not familiar or skilled. She was an excellent nurse. But that does not mean that I don't see the value in eliminating all the different scopes of practice for nursing and having onepoint of entry and one type of nurse. And because I feel this way does not mean that I think, JaneLPN/ADN, personally, is a horrible nurse and useless. I just personally think she should have a different title and different scope of practice.
    The last time I checked LPN was a different title and scope of practice.

    ADN having a different scope of practice? So what would you propose? What part of the ADN program would you cut out since there a thousands of ADN nurses functioning appropriately and safely at the bedside? ADN/BSN/MSN all follow the same standards set in the nurse practice act. They all take the same licensure exam....Please elaborate.
  7. by   SmilingBluEyes
    Commuter, I am originally from Chicago and now reside near Seattle and I am the BIGGEST ADN and LPN proponent you will see here. (ask anyone who knows me).So there goes your theory rofl.


    NOW can we get back on the subject please?
  8. by   austin heart
    Quote from Q.
    I just personally think she should have a different title and different scope of practice.
    First thing that I would like to know is how long have you been out of school and how long have you been a nurse?
    How does my scope of practice as an ADN differ than a a nurse with a BSN. Last I checked we all worked under the SAME rules set forth by the state's BNE and we all passed the SAME RN-NCLX. Tell me how our scope of practice differs.
    I don't know where you work but where I am the ADNs and BSNs work along side eachother doing the same job. And I can run circles around some of them when it comes to skills and knowledge.
    And I agree with the last poster, LVNs DO have a different scope of practice.
  9. by   SmilingBluEyes
    I would like to know that too...what "different" scope of practice would define an ADN nurse versus a BSN one? If both are floor nurses, doing the SAME job, what is the defining factor (besides the BSN) that makes her scope more broad than mine? Truly, I want to know what REALLY sets them that far apart, from us. Experience AND experience together, set nurses apart, to my thinking. MSN I can see---BSN over ADN? Scope is the same.
  10. by   kadokin
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I'm just going to chime in with a simple observation, so please don't flame me.

    Most of the degrading comments about LPNs/LVNs and ADN-educated nurses have been made by nurses who reside in the American 'strep-belt', the northern portion of the United States that extends from Washington State to Maine. Perhaps the attitudes about the educational levels of nurses are strongly linked to regional attitudes. This was merely a thought.
    Not a flame, and sorry to bring it up again, but what do you mean by "strep belt"? Strep as in streptococcus? I'm curious, I've never heard this term before. Please explain/educate.
  11. by   tntrn
    I'm curious about the "strep belt" too, since I've never heard the term. I am an ADN nurse, have a sister who started as a diploma nurse and is now a CRNA, and a big advocate LVN/LPN's working along side me. Sadly, our hospital did away with that several years ago. I do not, in any way, think it made patient care better. There are times when I've give my right arm to have one working with me.

    And I'm originally from Kansas, go Jayhawks, and now live in the Puget Sound area, by way of Idaho, then California.
  12. by   RN34TX
    Quote from TheCommuter
    I'm just going to chime in with a simple observation, so please don't flame me.

    Most of the degrading comments about LPNs/LVNs and ADN-educated nurses have been made by nurses who reside in the American 'strep-belt', the northern portion of the United States that extends from Washington State to Maine. Perhaps the attitudes about the educational levels of nurses are strongly linked to regional attitudes. This was merely a thought.
    I won't strike that theory down quite so quickly as others have.
    It may be only based on a sparse number of comments on this BB, and
    I myself have very limited knowledge and experience to back that up as well, but....
    I can say with confidence, that I did work as an LPN in MN for a brief period of time in the late 90's and it was, without a doubt, a very LPN unfriendly environment all around.
    I remember not being allowed to touch a central line to even flush it with heparin and couldn't even start an IV. Those tasks were looked at as "RN only" at least back in those days. I hope it's changed since then but I doubt it.
  13. by   TheCommuter
    Quote from kadokin
    Not a flame, and sorry to bring it up again, but what do you mean by "strep belt"? Strep as in streptococcus? I'm curious, I've never heard this term before. Please explain/educate.
    One of my former theory instructors, an MSN with 41 years of experience, uses that term to describe the upper portion of the U.S. between Washington state and Maine. According to her, people who visit or reside in that region are at increased risk for contracting strep infection.

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