"God Help You. You're on Dialysis."

  1. 4
    Every year, more than 100,000 Americans start dialysis. One in four of them will die within 12 months--a fatality rate that is one of the worst in the industrialized world. Oh, and dialysis arguably costs more here than anywhere else. Although taxpayers cover most of the bill, the government has kept confidential clinic data that could help patients make better decisions. How did our first foray into near-universal coverage, begun four decades ago with such great hope, turn out this way? And what lessons does it hold for the future of health-care reform?
    - Magazine - The Atlantic
  2. Visit  JeanettePNP profile page

    About JeanettePNP

    JeanettePNP has '2' year(s) of experience and specializes in 'Pediatric pulmonology and allergy'. From 'Private'; Joined Feb '06; Posts: 1,934; Likes: 1,328.

    38 Comments so far...

  3. Visit  canoehead profile page
    0
    "The pace can be so intense, inspections show, that clinics have allowed patients to soil themselves rather than interrupt dialysis for a bathroom break."

    We've had a few threads on this.
  4. Visit  leslie :-D profile page
    2
    that had to be one of the more depressing articles i've recently read.
    shame on us...the treaters and our govt, who hasn't set up tighter regs.

    i'm really disgusted.

    leslie
    NDXUFan and Jessy_RN like this.
  5. Visit  SaraO'Hara profile page
    1
    Had a dialysis pt. once with a high-stage decub to sacrum. The center wouldn't even reposition them or use the pressure-relief cushion we sent - "it might affect how the machine runs." "We have too many patients to do this." Pt. elected to go off dialysis, onto hospice.
    FranEMTnurse likes this.
  6. Visit  Kooky Korky profile page
    0
    I really thought I had heard it all, but the greed portrayed in this article has me truly frightened.

    We commoners truly are just not worth much, it seems - only as much as the insurers will pay to thieving business operators and their complicit doctors.
  7. Visit  rph3664 profile page
    1
    Not to mention the for-profit aspects of it. McDialysis, anybody?
    NDXUFan likes this.
  8. Visit  linearthinker profile page
    3
    Id rather be dead than on dialysis.
    NDXUFan, Gratefulprn, and rph3664 like this.
  9. Visit  suni profile page
    2
    This article is so disheartening to me, and I believe things will only get worse with health care reform. Not only is this showing incompetency but also just a lack of human caring. It also is a great example of how patients and families need a strong advocate every step of the way in the health care maze today
    Gratefulprn and FranEMTnurse like this.
  10. Visit  tralalaRN profile page
    2
    I worked in dialysis for 14 months as an RN for Fresenius, one of the giants mentioned in the article. It is this bad. Our clinic was understaffed and we had high acuity patients from a local veterans home - amputees, big co-morbids. .I left this clinic, as I was terrified every day that something big was going to happen, and I would be the one thrown under the bus. Best nursing decision I've made.
    blondy2061h and lilaclover like this.
  11. Visit  beewink profile page
    2
    Quote from tralalaRN
    I worked in dialysis for 14 months as an RN for Fresenius, one of the giants mentioned in the article. It is this bad. Our clinic was understaffed and we had high acuity patients from a local veterans home - amputees, big co-morbids. .I left this clinic, as I was terrified every day that something big was going to happen, and I would be the one thrown under the bus. Best nursing decision I've made.
    Good for you for leaving that environment. It is so sad to think that patients are treated like this.
    FranEMTnurse and blondy2061h like this.
  12. Visit  P_RN profile page
    5
    My husband's sister died in 1973 of renal failure. She did not qualify for dialysis because she did not have the money and Medicare wasn't available. She did not qualify for organ transplant (she had a twin sister who was willing to donate)-again no money and "her vessels would probably not hold a transplant." She was 36 I believe. She left a 5 year old and an 11 year old. Thirty six and now anybody who has that red/white and blue card gets prime care compared to the death she had. It makes me weep.
    VICEDRN, FranEMTnurse, blondy2061h, and 2 others like this.
  13. Visit  AndyLyn profile page
    0
    As a Case Manager I once arranged dialysis for a 97 year old woman. When I talked with the family, they were in the dark, the nephrologist had never discussed with them what being on dialysis would actually be like - 3x a week, hours from home, feeling like crap most all of the time. They were surprised - they assumed she'd pop right back up like a punching doll. It was very sad.
  14. Visit  TheCommuter profile page
    6
    Quote from beewink
    It is so sad to think that patients are treated like this.
    I have a sneaking suspicion that many dialysis patients are treated in a substandard manner due to who they are in society.

    Let's be completely honest. The majority of dialysis patients come from the most marginalized groups in American society. The poor, the working class, elderly people, African-Americans, and Latinos are the ones most likely to end up on dialysis for a number of reasons. To be even more blunt, these groups are not the most valued or prized, so many of their plights do not receive much attention from the media.

    There. . . I said it.
    VICEDRN, FranEMTnurse, MsbossyRN, and 3 others like this.

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