"Fixin' to die"

  1. Anyone see the story regarding the school nurse who thought one of the students had a routine stomach virus when the teacher summoned her only to discover the kid was showing signs of a stroke?In interviews she is quoted as saying she thought he was "fixin' to die".Discuss.Me first-color me appalled......

    School Nurse Assumes Sick Kid She'''s Called to Help Has the Stomach Flu. One Look Has Her Calling 911
    Last edit by TheCommuter on Dec 23, '16 : Reason: News story website link added
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  2. 80 Comments

  3. by   Double-Helix
    I'm not sure you have the story straight. The school nurse was called to see a sick kid. She "assumed" it was the stomach flu prior to seeing him because it was going around the school. Once she saw him, she immediately knew something was seriously wrong and called 911.

    "Fixin' to die" is simply regional language meaning that he was decompensating very quickly.

    I don't see what about the story has you "appalled."

    School Nurse Assumes Sick Kid She'''s Called to Help Has the Stomach Flu. One Look Has Her Calling 911
  4. by   Sour Lemon
    Quote from Double-Helix

    "Fixin' to die" is simply regional language meaning that he was decompensating very quickly.
    I've never heard that phrase used before- at least not in a medical context. My first thought was that I would have probably chosen different words to describe the situation. But after actually reading the story, "fixin' to die" sounds pretty accurate. I'm glad the kid is OK. Good catch, school nurse!
  5. by   sevensonnets
    "Fixing" to do anything is indeed a regional expression meaning anything you're about to do. You might be fixing to get up out of your chair, fixing to go to work in the morning, or fixing to go to Florida next March. It's an all-purpose expression. Occasionally it gets used in the "I'm fixing to die" context. I wouldn't get too hung up on the "fixin to" part. Sometimes when a patient says they're fixin to die they do it.
  6. by   ktwlpn
    I did read the story,I also know that terms such as "fixin' to die" "circling the drain" etc.I also know it is "regional".My point is it makes her sound ignorant.We nurses continue to strive to be recognized as professionals.I would th ok no anyone with even a minimum of education would put their best foot forward during an interview and use proper English.I guess it's my issue.
  7. by   sallyrnrrt
    She was not to ignorant , as she critical thought and intervened, with 911/ems.....

    now with all my decades of critical care experience, am fixin to cook dinner....
  8. by   Double-Helix
    "Fixin' to die" is probably perfectly normal and common speech where she is from. Saying she sounds ignorant for using her typical phrases is pretty judgemental, in my opinion. Where she is from and how she speaks has nothing to do with her competence or professionalism.
  9. by   CelticGoddess
    Quote from ktwlpn
    I did read the story,I also know that terms such as "fixin' to die" "circling the drain" etc.I also know it is "regional".My point is it makes her sound ignorant.We nurses continue to strive to be recognized as professionals.I would th ok no anyone with even a minimum of education would put their best foot forward during an interview and use proper English.I guess it's my issue.
    My advice to you is don't move to the south. We speak like this. And I'd say most of us are intelligent. I don't chart the way I talk. I have presented to the ED saying "I feel like I'm fixing to die". It doesn't make me a hick or unintelligent. It just means that I am from the south.

    So she said it in an interview. I highly doubt she wrote it in her chart
    Last edit by CelticGoddess on Dec 22, '16 : Reason: changed wording
  10. by   ItsThatJenGirl
    Quote from ktwlpn
    I did read the story,I also know that terms such as "fixin' to die" "circling the drain" etc.I also know it is "regional".My point is it makes her sound ignorant.We nurses continue to strive to be recognized as professionals.I would th ok no anyone with even a minimum of education would put their best foot forward during an interview and use proper English.I guess it's my issue.
    That's entirely your opinion.

    Some people might think that people who spell incorrectly or leave out spaces between their sentences might be ignorant. But I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and assume you're on mobile and doing the best you can.
  11. by   sallyrnrrt
    Im fixin to go to bed, my rooster crows early
  12. by   Spidey's mom
    Good for the school nurse!

    My family on both sides before my parents are from the south and "fixin' to die" is part of our lexicon, so to speak.

    I'm fixin' to start dinner after cleaning all day.
  13. by   nuangel1
    Thank God the nurse used good judgement and immediately knew something was seriously wrong and called 911.I read the story it sounds like she did everything correct.I dont feel that by her using that statement she sounds ignorant at all.it sounds like a southern slang that is used .
  14. by   chacha82
    Fixin, sit a spell, hear tell, carry, (instead of bring or take). I reckon, I'd not like to, usual suspects and known criminals.
    Them things, hot it up, be wicked enough, a fat lot, Jesus Mary and Joseph and all the saints preserve us
    Right nuisance, shouldn't take notice...all these things I'm sure I said in the last week or two. Southern/Irish hybrid vocab.

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