The Unwritten Laws Nurse Managers Live By - page 4

by rntj 21,649 Views | 79 Comments

1. Always believe the worst about your subordinates, no matter how glowing a reputation or history of competence they may have. Never give anybody the benefit of the doubt. 2. Never praise or give an "attaboy", and always... Read More


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    Quote from rntj
    As I have said before, I am not trying to paint ALL nurse managers with this brush. This has just been my personal experience. Can't say I haven't ever had a good one, I did have one, but not at the hospital I work at now. It has been my personal experience that the Magnet facility I work at is particularly hard on the nurses, and has a well-earned reputation for being that way among the nursing community in the city I live in.
    *** Not just your hospital. In my area Magnet hospitals have earned a reputation as not being good places to work.
    rntj and Wise Woman RN like this.
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    Was thinking of nursing management as an option in the future...somewhat discouraging.
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    Here's another unwritten rule nurse managers live by: The word of another manager counts more than your personal experience with your subordinate. You know this subordinate is a good worker, and will do okay as a nurse, but you won't hire her on as a nurse because of the malicious lies of an evil manager. You know this subordinate worker is prompt and accurate in her work, and those attributes would translate well into the nursing role. But no, you instead listen to a fellow manager, discounting all the positive feedback you've received about your subordinate from her coworkers.

    Managers are a group unto themselves, sadly. They're so isolated from their subordinates, that they get rid of good workers based on lies and keep bad workers for a long time.
    enchantmentdis, ybanurse, and sparkyr like this.
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    Exactly, I would never have imagined being 13 years experienced, using micro sick time, working tons of overtime. Come in at the last minute, got along extremely well with all of my co workers, but because my manager and I had personality differences she has sabotaged my career in my local community. I work for an at will employer and believe me, being fired 2 x by her has absolutely soured me to nursing. She followed me to my last job after my manager there retired. My previous manager asked me to come work for her, because she knew I was an excellent worker. Bullying is very pervasive in nursing. In fact I believe it is an epidemic in nursing.

    Sent from my iPhone using allnurses.com
    enchantmentdis, jadelpn, ybanurse, and 1 other like this.
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    Ya know I've noticed that some nursing managers are like this, some agents but why does it seem like most people in a higher position get there by being jerks?
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    Quote from hilife_RN
    Was thinking of nursing management as an option in the future...somewhat discouraging.
    I've had some fantastic nurse managers, and some horrible nurse managers. One thing I've learned over the years is just how much this person's personality and value system influences everything about your unit.

    The thing is, somebody has to do it. Why not use this time to be a keen observer of what works and what doesn't? Some of the worst managers were strictly from the textbook and had no understanding of human nature.
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    Quote from PMFB-RN

    *** Wow, that is exactly my experience working at several famous Magnet hospitals. Now I am lucky enough to work in a non Magnet, not famous hospital. I have the best nurse manager I have ever had.
    I wonder if Magnet is the common denominator?
    Magnet Hospitals is not the common denominator BUT the hospital I worked at 'became' Magnet while I was employed there. Same type of incompetent NM's who are like the budget soldiers and sour bullys. When I worked there I couldn't believe they could get Magnet Status because they didn't meet the ANA requirements. Turns out it is a bought and paid for Status. The ANA just said to me it takes a long time to change a culture. So they apparently do some consulting...pfft...its a Magnet for increased business via deception...sad really
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    The nastier and more unapproachable the Nurse Manager the more clinically incompetent. Try to get close enough to one of them and pick their brain. You'll see...I refer to these types as deadwood they need to go....
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    Quote from lkulmann
    The nastier and more unapproachable the Nurse Manager the more clinically incompetent. Try to get close enough to one of them and pick their brain. You'll see...I refer to these types as deadwood they need to go....
    Now that you put it that way......I have to agree. Typically....these days many have no brain to pick. So I have to agree with you there.....administrators don't want bright, innovative, caring managers...they want task masters and yes men.

    I was a great manager. I always had waiting lists into my units. I stood behind my nurses and allowed them to manage themselves...I would only step in when needed. I refused to micro manage, I never allowed bullying or gossip and always surrounded myself with the best and brightest.

    That is why I left management....they wanted an unreasonable budget, staffing cuts that were unsafe and could careless about the staff. These "deadwoods" are what the senior management want so I don't think they will be going anywhere soon....((HUGS))
    JeanettePNP likes this.
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    Quote from Esme12
    Now that you put it that way......I have to agree. Typically....these days many have no brain to pick. So I have to agree with you there.....administrators don't want bright, innovative, caring managers...they want task masters and yes men.

    I was a great manager. I always had waiting lists into my units. I stood behind my nurses and allowed them to manage themselves...I would only step in when needed. I refused to micro manage, I never allowed bullying or gossip and always surrounded myself with the best and brightest.

    That is why I left management....they wanted an unreasonable budget, staffing cuts that were unsafe and could careless about the staff. These "deadwoods" are what the senior management want so I don't think they will be going anywhere soon....((HUGS))
    Boy do I ever miss your type of manager, Esme. Most of mine were as you describe yourself, and were never loathe to pitch in and help with patient care. In those days, most worked their way up the ranks and could change an occupied bed better than some of the techs. If anyone presently has a manager like that, let them know how much you appreciate them!


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