Nurse managers-Do you think tattoos look professional? - page 5

by Blackcat99 14,825 Views | 46 Comments

I am curious as to how nursing managers feel about tattoos. I know some people love tattoos and some people hate tattoos. Since nurse managers are in charge of hiring nurses, I am wondering how they feel about tattoos.... Read More


  1. 1
    Why except for ears? What makes ears ok? Pierced ears were once seen as satanic so what changed over the years to make them "ok"? Just saying...time changes many opinions. As nurses and managers we have to be open to change.
    Blackcat99 likes this.
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    Older, but otherwise A & O X3 resident complained about a nurse's multiple tattoos this weekend.

    The crux of it: he took it as an indicator that she wasn't competent. Asked for another nurse to complete his care.
    Blackcat99 likes this.
  3. 2
    Wow. This is my first time on here and love the varieties of forums. Anyways, this one caught my eye and as I read through it I became more disgusted w the ignorance of some people! Don't judge a book by its cover!!! Everyone in my family has at least 1 tattoo but all are covered when dressed in scrubs. I do find it professional if you can cover it BUT to think that they could be doing drugs or not do their job just because they decided to have a tat?!? Wow. My tattoo is a flower on my right flank... It's a twin flower to my sisters. It means a lot to me and you're telling me that if you saw it I could be a druggie? Hahaha! I love the other comments that agreed with mine but for everyone else- I would love to say.. Get with the times and understand that you should not judge anyone until you get to know them. My brother-in-law has full sleeves and a shaved head. I know for a fact he gets judged right away because I've heard it! He happens to be one of the nicest and most anti-drug people I've ever met!
    So, yes, if you can cover it then great! Other cultures may be offended or older generations and I respect all, buuuut do not judge someone for any of this. Yet, I do agree with the tongue piercing a being a no-no. It's difficult to understand them and most play with it when they are idle... I'm saying out of experience with my friends who have had them.
    loriangel14 and Blackcat99 like this.
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    As a manager, I judge more by the "content of character" than the color of the ink in their skin, as I would hope my administrator and DON do with me. I have six large tattoos, covering the left side of my chest, bicep, shoulder; left calf, right ankle and left wrist. I have an unconventional ear piercing in my inner cartilage. I am confident, competent, well spoken, and fair. I look for the same in my staff.
    loriangel14 and Blackcat99 like this.
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    A lot of the comments related to this post seem not only judgmental, but very biased. It makes me wonder if those posting treat their patients with the same level of judgment, since, as a professional, nurses are expected to give unbiased care, regardless of the appearance or background of the patient. It is unfortunate they do not seem to have similar compassion for their coworkers.

    That being said, I am a RN, I actually have my bachelors, and have not only been a practicing cardiac nurse for 5 years, but also was very quickly promoted to a charge nurse at my current job 2 years ago. I have 2 full tattoo sleeves and can honestly say I have NOT ONCE had a patient OR patient's family complain or express discomfort with me taking care of them. Most of the time, they are very complimentary of my choice to express my personality through my artwork.

    In addition, not once have I ever been referred to as 'unprofessional' or 'trashy' or any of the like by a coworker, manager, or CNO/CEO. Just the opposite, actually. I am not required to cover my arms, however made a personal decision early in my career that if my patients seemed uncomfortable with my choice of expression, I would cover them. I have never had the situation occur, therefore I do not cover my tattoos. I frequently discuss my tattoo choices with my patients and, if anything, it brings me closer with them, even the elderly ones (which, being a cardiac nurse, is a large majority of my patient population).

    I feel if a person is educated, and compassionate, to discriminate against then based on a lifestyle choice, not only negates the level of morality and ethics a nurse should be expected to have, but very much makes the discriminator seem like the lesser person.
    stephaniemaried likes this.
  6. 0
    Quote from CynicalRN
    ... I have NOT ONCE had a patient OR patient's family complain or express discomfort with me...
    From my experience, rarely will a patient (or family) complain about tattoos... especially while still in a cardiac / ICU setting for various understandable reasons.

    I don't presume from the above that many of our clients, particularly older ones, don't consider them unprofessional.

    And if they have such a view, yes it's discriminatory, but totally their right to be... whether we agree with them or not.
  7. 0
    Quote from CynicalRN
    A lot of the comments related to this post seem not only judgmental, but very biased. It makes me wonder if those posting treat their patients with the same level of judgment, since, as a professional, nurses are expected to give unbiased care, regardless of the appearance or background of the patient. It is unfortunate they do not seem to have similar compassion for their coworkers.

    That being said, I am a RN, I actually have my bachelors, and have not only been a practicing cardiac nurse for 5 years, but also was very quickly promoted to a charge nurse at my current job 2 years ago. I have 2 full tattoo sleeves and can honestly say I have NOT ONCE had a patient OR patient's family complain or express discomfort with me taking care of them. Most of the time, they are very complimentary of my choice to express my personality through my artwork.

    In addition, not once have I ever been referred to as 'unprofessional' or 'trashy' or any of the like by a coworker, manager, or CNO/CEO. Just the opposite, actually. I am not required to cover my arms, however made a personal decision early in my career that if my patients seemed uncomfortable with my choice of expression, I would cover them. I have never had the situation occur, therefore I do not cover my tattoos. I frequently discuss my tattoo choices with my patients and, if anything, it brings me closer with them, even the elderly ones (which, being a cardiac nurse, is a large majority of my patient population).

    I feel if a person is educated, and compassionate, to discriminate against then based on a lifestyle choice, not only negates the level of morality and ethics a nurse should be expected to have, but very much makes the discriminator seem like the lesser person.
    I must say - you're awesome!
    Let your light shine!


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