"Blinded" application/resume reviews - page 2

by nicuguy

Have any of you or your facilities utilized blinded application/resume reviewing systems? By blinded, I mean that all demographic information (name, address, telephone, e-mail address) are removed from the application prior to... Read More


  1. 0
    Quote from Havin' A Party!
    Hey there, Nicu!

    Here's how I see name, address and e-addy relevant:

    NAME: Possibly someone on the selection team or fellow / sister staff member may have worked alongside the applicant and may be able to furnish fabulous info on performance, fit, etc.

    ADDRESS: Ability to physically get to work timely, if at all, during trying times... snow and ice storms, emergencies, etc. May also necessitate addressing the issue (NPI) if the commute would be extraordinary long.

    E-ADDY: Ridiculous e-addresses may call into question maturity, level of professionalism, or other concern.
    Hi Havin' A Party!

    Regarding the relevancy of the name, if a person is known to someone in the unit, they would have ways of getting their information to the right people. There is usually a "referred by" or "who do you know who works here" section on the application. For those who do not have the benefit of being known or knowing someone in the unit, blinding their name for the INITIAL screen works toward eliminating biases that have been shown to be present in individuals in the hiring system.

    With addresses I can see a potential for consideration if there were two or more applicants with identical qualifications. Even though address/physical location is not a protected category, if someone indicated they were able to meet all the requirements of the job (scheduling/on-call/etc), I'd still be careful asking them for details on how they plan to meet them. Also, since many areas (particularly in major cities) have a historical racial or ethnic makeup, one would have to be very careful that not hiring someone from a particular location who is qualified and able to meet the requirements doesn't fall afoul of any employment discrimination law, particularly if the hiring manager has asked questions about being able to meet the requirements and received answers that would be satisfactory from ANY potential applicant.

    E-mail address: Again, this would involve making a determination about someone's actual skills and previous experience on the basis of a way to contact them. While I don't disagree that someone with the e-mail address "SexyStud@hotmail.com" would be less likely overall to get a call-back, the address itself tells you nothing about the person's abilities. If you had interviewed a candidate who had a great interview, high quality references, and demonstrated education and work experience, would you really no longer consider them based on their e-mail address?

    My whole idea behind this notion is remove potential areas of bias that have nothing to do with actual performance. As I noted in a previous post, Google has released information from its own hiring studies that other commonly used measures and interview techniques have little to no correlation with actual job performance. There is a lot of improvement left to be made in the hiring/interview process, though that isn't limited to healthcare.

    Thanks for your response!
  2. 0
    Quote from nicuguy
    ... if a person is known to someone in the unit, they would have ways of getting their information to the right people...
    Not necessarily. Just a quick anecdote: In my previous position, I didn't realize two co-workers from my past were employed there, until I met them during orientation.

    " ...With addresses I can see a potential for consideration if there were two or more applicants with identical qualifications"...

    Never encountered any applicants with the above characteristic.

    "... Even though address/physical location is not a protected category, if someone indicated they were able to meet all the requirements of the job (scheduling/on-call/etc), I'd still be careful asking them for details on how they plan to meet them... "

    First off, by "address," I intended only the city of current residence.

    When we come across applicants from distant locations (say more than an hour away), we make it a point to actually discuss facility expectations for coverage during emergencies. I think it's important to be clear and upfront about this. Long commutes just raise natural questions.

    As an example, not that it was a requirement, but when I applied for a spot out-of-State, I made sure an explanation about my pending relocation to a nearby community was included in my letter of transmittal.

    "... the e-mail address "SexyStud@hotmail.com"... the address itself tells you nothing about the person's abilities... "

    Agree with the above. However, to me, "abilities" are not the sole determiner... or even the most significant quality, of an excellent hire.

    Skills are typically more readily "teachable." But when the lack of good judgment, professionalism, common sense, and good taste is readily demonstrated in an app for one of our licensed nursing positions, it just about guarantees a no-hire decision.

    The hiring call is a critical one. And an expensive undertaking. If the hiree ends up leaving prematurely, it has serious impacts on many at the facility.

    Most managers I've known, I'd say, would prefer to have more information than less before undertaking a major decision.

    Good luck with your new process. Please let us know in six months or so how it's worked out in practice. Thanks!


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