Are there any RNs with an actual job with a sealed record?

  1. 0
    Hello everyone.

    I apologize in advance if this sounds repetitive but I am so depressed! During the few days I have been on this forum nonstop, trying to find success stories but I can not seem to find any. I think I came across one or two and found out that they have been offered the job, and once the background check was done their offer had been declined. I feel pretty much hopeless. The conclusion seems to be that it IS possible to get into nursing school, and then your license with some time, but then impossible to get a job.

    My story: 9 years ago, I was 18 when I was arrested for petty theft. (First and only) I can't rememeber exactly what happened after- I was in such shock and disappointment with myself. Anyway my lawyer told me that I would be granted a ACD and my case would be sealed if I was not arrested again. I attended a class as well. I'm not sure if I was a "YO" so I am mailing the FBI a record request to make sure it was sealed.....

    I guess I just wanted someone to talk to. The only family I have right now is my older brother and if he found out, he would look at me completely differently. I am so sad. Who knew that one mistake would keep me from my dream? It's unbelievable because I recognize my terrible mistake but it is NOT in any way the person I am today.

    I guess I would like to know if there are any nurses with an actual job who have a sealed record? And any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you for taking the time to read this.

    Sincerely,
    Party
  2. 11 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    Quote from Pattycakes85
    Hello everyone.

    I apologize in advance if this sounds repetitive but I am so depressed! During the few days I have been on this forum nonstop, trying to find success stories but I can not seem to find any. I think I came across one or two and found out that they have been offered the job, and once the background check was done their offer had been declined. I feel pretty much hopeless. The conclusion seems to be that it IS possible to get into nursing school, and then your license with some time, but then impossible to get a job.

    My story: 9 years ago, I was 18 when I was arrested for petty theft. (First and only) I can't rememeber exactly what happened after- I was in such shock and disappointment with myself. Anyway my lawyer told me that I would be granted a ACD and my case would be sealed if I was not arrested again. I attended a class as well. I'm not sure if I was a "YO" so I am mailing the FBI a record request to make sure it was sealed.....

    I guess I just wanted someone to talk to. The only family I have right now is my older brother and if he found out, he would look at me completely differently. I am so sad. Who knew that one mistake would keep me from my dream? It's unbelievable because I recognize my terrible mistake but it is NOT in any way the person I am today.

    I guess I would like to know if there are any nurses with an actual job who have a sealed record? And any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Thank you for taking the time to read this.

    Sincerely,
    Party
    I would not be so despondent. Many job applications use the verbiage, "in the past ten years" when asking about background information. You are coming up on that ten year cut-off. Some will ask if you have ever been arrested/ convicted, etc. The key for you is to have someone (credit agenices or other entity surely must do this for a fee for people) run a standard background check on you to see what, if anything, comes up regarding your arrest. There are several larger firms who handle these types of checks for larger employers; rarely is this service performed in-house. These outside vendors want to do a good job to retain their contracts, but they also want to keep their costs down. They do not have the time or manpower to find everything, esp. something that has been sealed. Your crime might not even show up on a national background check. Even if the application asks about ANY arrests, the actual background check performed often only goes back 10 years. This is true even for security sensitive positions such as aviation.

    I was always amazed when I worked for an airline how many employees admitted to having DUIs and other arrests. One flight attendant I knew was even refused entry to Canada when they ran a quick computer check on him at the border, saw the DUI, and would not let him enter the country because in Canada, a DUI is a felony and certain felons (for DUI, I believe it was felonies committed fewer than 10 years ago) are not allowed entry into Canada without special permission. Some flight attendants even admitted to me that they fudged their application to get hired; others put past transgressions down on their applications and still got hired, and this is an extremely competitive industry. I am also sure there are many people working in health care as RNs and LPNs, etc., who have similar infractions from their past as you who somehow managed to get their foot in the door. Most of them are probably not eager to share this online with you, which is why you are having trouble finding "success stories." They are out there, trust me.

    If you don't want to outright lie on an application that specifically asks if you have ever been arrested and/ or convicted of any crime -- and I certainly don't blame you for not wanting to -- you can always leave the question blank and seek clarification during the interview. If you are properly qualified for the job, and interview well, you could explain your situation to the interviewer and state that you were not sure how to answer the question because your case had been sealed and were 18 and it was 10 years ago, etc., and therefore, left it blank. This way, you are not lying, and you get a chance to really make your case and state why you should still be hired despite a misdemeanor 10 years ago, and allay any concerns an interviewer might have. They are only human; they and their family members have made similar mistakes. Is this a sure bet to work every time? Of course not, but you definitely have a shot! And this is not an all-or-nothing process, after all. I would go for your goals and not worry about this. All that you need is one "yes" from one employer one time, and you're in. From there, if you build up a good work history, and as more time passes, the crime you committed at 18 will become even less of an issue. If you knock on enough doors, I am confident it will happen. Don't give up before you've even started. That's unnecessarily borrowing trouble in my opinion. Best of luck to you!!
  4. 0
    Quote from norlns24
    Hi.....

    Can I hug you?? :')

    Thank you so much for your response. It was very encouraging. And you are completely right--- I shouldnt give up before I even start. I guess reading everyone's experiences on this forum completely knocked me down. For the first time I found a passion and was so excited and confident to begin. I have not felt this way before. I had no desire to go to college until I discovered that I wanted to be a nurse. I was just really happy. And then... I found out all this out Sigh. I guess I am emotionally and mentally drained... I feel like I crushed my own dreams.. i hate myself!!!

    I will have to at least TRY...


    Thanks again. =)
  5. 2
    I will not be too specific with my story to preserve my anonymity, but I have a record, graduated nursing school with honors, got my license, and work full time.
    BirdylouRN and MAtoBSN like this.
  6. 0
    Quote from gypsyd8
    I will not be too specific with my story to preserve my anonymity, but I have a record, graduated nursing school with honors, got my license, and work full time.
    Really?? Thats really encouraging for me- thank you. Did they give you a really hard time, each step of the way?

    I am willing to work hard and give it my absolute all, but I dont think I can handle being unemployed for a year or two simply because of my history.

    Gypsyd8,

    Do you have any suggestions to boost up my application? I currently volunteer (not at a hospital though) but I feel like that is not enough. I do not have much free time though. I am a manager at Abercrombie and Fitch so I work
  7. 0
    Continued... My previpous post got cut off.

    I meant to say, I work A LOT. I feel like I need to start networking or building stronger relationships with people who can be great references.. I doubt hospitals will take references from Abercrombie seriously.

    Any suggestions would be great...
    Thank you soo much for both of your responses!!
  8. 1
    I have sealed record of disorderly conduct (a violation), which was a plea deal down from a Class E felony. I was in nursing school before the record was sealed and it was sealed by the time I graduated. I have a job now and had no issues when looking for work.
    BirdylouRN likes this.
  9. 0
    Thank you so much Eightyseven!

    I guess I am just so paranoid. I am going to apply for nursing school and see what happens... Wont be until February but wish me luck.

    I just applied for a CNA class... Hope that they will accept me. I checked off NO under conviction but YES to the arrest. That should be okay, right?
  10. 0
    A reference from a solid, ongoing work relationship (for ex., from a fellow manager or district manager, etc. at A-F) is important, not necessarily whether it comes from a health-care related relationship. The content of the letter and the length and nature of the relationship matter more than anything else. Skills needed and valued in the medical field are the same skills needed and valued in most jobs/ careers, and these can be demonstrated in a variety of ways and settings. Most of the time, reference letters are just a formality anyway... a box will be checked on a form that you have included them with your application and that's it. They are usually only glanced at or skimmed and not read or scrutinized too carefully, except perhaps in cases of a tie-breaker. Only if a letter of reference is glaringly poorly written, from an obviously unreliable source, or not included at all would eyebrows be raised and your chances of not being selected diminished.

    Having said all this, volunteering in a health-care setting, even if only a few hours a week, is always a good idea. Not only are you able to learn by observing and just being in a health-care environment, but it just looks good on an application. Many med. programs that require health-care experience will actually count volunteer hours towards their requirement, which means volunteering is clearly viewed as worthwhile.
  11. 0
    Thank you soooo much for those of you who have taken the time to reply. I am very happy that I found this forum. =')

    I decided to take on a CNA class and start there...in hopes to gain experience and meet people who can help me. I hear the job market in the entire nursing field is pretty rough so I will have to work extra hard!!


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