New LPN with a minor misdemeanor on background and can't find a job

  1. 0
    I am a recent LPN graduate. I graduated with a 3.62 GPA, had an awesome post-graduate internship at a hospital, and passed my boards with flying colors. The hospital where I was interning liked me so much, they offered me a position. 3 days before I was supposed to start orientation, they called me and said they had to revoke my offer because of a misdemeanor I received in 2008. Not only is this embarassing, but my heart is broken. I had bounced a $15, yes thats it, check and it went to court. I was 19 years old, and plead guilty and just paid it. I had no idea this "little" check would come in the way of my career. I have tried to hire a lawyer to get it expunged, but no one can do it because it was within the past 5 years.

    I need a job in the worst way and cant find one anywhere. Any advice or helpful tips. Is this misdemeanor going to affect all potential employment opportunities? I am a good person, and worked really hard in school- I can't believe this has happened.

    Thanks everyone!
  2. 10 Comments so far...

  3. 0
    IDK if you did this, but did you explain what the 'crime' you committed was?
  4. 1
    It has been my personal experience that the long term care facilities (a.k.a. nursing homes) in the area where I live tend to not perform the same types of stringent background checks that are done at major hospitals. This is because these facilities are often desperate for staff and will overlook criminal histories. If you need a job badly, this might be an option for now.
    trugemlpn likes this.
  5. 0
    unfortunately, this issue is going to impede your hiring as a recent issue. look carefully at hiring form "have you ever been convicted of criminal offense" need to answer yes rather than than no ---that's often what trips people up in hiring process. disclosure as part of hiring process is your best bet --background check will have full criminal conviction records so one cannot hide from issue.

    home health is an area that has stringent federal legislation re hiring as staff work independently. hospitals and snf less regulations.
    nursing positions, especially in hospitals are scarce today.
    seeking expungement as soon as you can will help in future hiring. best wishes in moving forward with your life and career.

    check out the advice offered here:
    national helping individuals with criminal record re-enter through employment network
    Last edit by NRSKarenRN on Jun 21, '10
  6. 0
    Quote from TheCommuter
    It has been my personal experience that the long term care facilities (a.k.a. nursing homes) in the area where I live tend to not perform the same types of stringent background checks that are done at major hospitals. This is because these facilities are often desperate for staff and will overlook criminal histories. If you need a job badly, this might be an option for now.

    The place I've worked at has fired a few people after their background checks were done. But I can't imagine getting let go for that. Be upfront.
  7. 0
    I am sorry to hear that your offer was rescinded. However, I must ask if you disclosed the offense on the job application? Failure to disclose is usually a big reason why companies will rescind an offer. Its an issue of honesty. Believe or not, even with your crime being a recent issue most companies wont care about the offense (if its a minor offense and if your explanation can show that you are remorseful for your past actions and learned from it) if you are up front about it. I have a DUI on my record and was able to find employment in hospitals, however, I was upfront on the job app about the offense. There could be other factors in you not finding jobs such as lack of experience. Many hospitals are look to see if a new grad completed an externship or have previous tech experience.
  8. 0
    Quote from DizzyLizzyNurse
    IDK if you did this, but did you explain what the 'crime' you committed was?
    She bounced a check: that is, she wrote a check but didn't have enough money in her bank account to cover payment when the receipient of the check cashed it. Even though a lot of people bounce checks in all innocence (they didn't intend to bounce them, it just happened), it's still considered a form of fraud.
    Last edit by Meriwhen on Jun 24, '10
  9. 0
    No, I meant on the interview did she tell them what the crime was. It seems to me that to say that upfront would be best. They are going to check anyway and it's such a minor thing. I've bounced checks myself before.
  10. 0
    No I know what happened. I meant did she tell the person interviewing her about it? They're going to find out about it either way and it's such a minor thing maybe they would just appreciate your honesty.
  11. 0
    Quote from DizzyLizzyNurse
    No, I meant on the interview did she tell them what the crime was. It seems to me that to say that upfront would be best. They are going to check anyway and it's such a minor thing. I've bounced checks myself before.
    Ah, I thought you meant did the OP ever explain it here.

    I've bounced a couple of checks when I was younger. Not proud of it, nor did I intend to--I just got caught short when the check was cashed. But nowadays, more places are taking the check bouncers to court and filing charges, so I guess you and I got off lucky.

    It's sad though that most employers see the word "misdemeanor" and automatically apply a negative tag to the person. Since it's there and can't go away for a few more years, I agree with the others--be upfront about it and show that you've made restitution and learned your lesson.


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