can I become a RN with a misdemeanor charge?

  1. 0
    ok, here is my situation...
    I was a RN student at my local college and had to withdraw because of family issues. I did amazing while attending that school, but I am now trying to get into a RN program at a different school ( not going back to the one that I was previously in b/c the instructors claim they care, but do not). So, here's what I'm struggling with. After speaking with the Nursing dept advisor, I explained to him that recently I was charged with a misdemeanor ( nothing to do with drugs or violence) he said that I shouldn't have a problem getting into the program since it was not a violent crime. But when I have completed my courses and sit for the NCLEX, will I be able to become licensed with a misdemeanor on my record? I know this may be a touchy subject for some, but I am truly sorry for what I had done and I am trying to turn my life around for myself and my children. Any advise or tips/suggestions anyone may have will be greatly appreciated!
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  3. 14 Comments so far...

  4. 0
    moved for best response.
  5. 0
    we can't give you an answer, it will depend on what you were cited for and what state you are in. And no, I am not asking you what or where. Try calling your BON, or email them, to get an opinion. good luck
  6. 4
    It depends what state you decide to get your license. Some states may straight up deny your license or put stipulations on it. Others will be more lenient. I had three misdemeanor charges, and I had to wait for the final disposition then send in court documents. After the board looked at it, my application was approved and my license number was posted the next day!

    Some BON websites have an archive of what people got stipulations or warnings for. A lot of them were serious things like narcotics diversion or multiple convictions. Some applications ask only if you had a felony charge- you can check here for more info- https://www.ncsbn.org/profiles.htm
  7. 0
    I truly do wish you the best of luck
  8. 0
    Thank you all for your advice and words of encouragment. I currently live in WV but once finished with school I plan to take the NCLEX and hopefully be able to practice in MD. I have emailed the BON in MD and briefly explained my situation, including what I was charged with, so hopefully they can provide some insight on my situation. Keep those fingers crossed for me. I know this is what I was made to do and I am darn good at it. I just want the chance to prove that I am sorry for what I have done and provide a better life for my family and myself.
  9. 0
    This is not advice, but merely words of encouragement:

    I go to a school in Maryland and I have a previous misdemeanor charge from 15 years ago (although convicted of a violation). During all my questioning, several people (a nursing attorney, the dean of my school, etc.) have told me they know people who have gotten licenses with felony convictions. So don't lose hope! :-)
  10. 0
    Quote from db2xs
    This is not advice, but merely words of encouragement:

    I go to a school in Maryland and I have a previous misdemeanor charge from 15 years ago (although convicted of a violation). During all my questioning, several people (a nursing attorney, the dean of my school, etc.) have told me they know people who have gotten licenses with felony convictions. So don't lose hope! :-)
    Or hold out false hope.
  11. 0
    In some states it is possible to "expunge" (more or less erase) the record of a conviction. If a conviction is expunged you can say that you have no convictions. Expungement can usually be asked for "x" number of years after the conviction. You might start by googling the words "expunge criminal conviction + (your state)." If expungement seems possible, get the help of an attorney. Under certain circumstances you may (or may not) be asked about expunged convictions, e.g. by a state nursing board. I am not an attorney; sorry if I don't have this 100% correct.
  12. 0
    Short answer: it's possible to get licensed if you have a misdemeanor in your past.

    Long answer: it's up to each board to decide if they will license you...and they review each applicant on a case-by-case basis. The fact that one nurse gets licensed (or rejected) doesn't mean that another nurse with a similar criminal history will automatically have the same fate.

    All you can do is apply to the board, submit all required documentation, and hope for the best. If you have any legal questions, you need to consult with a lawyer. Also, should you have to go in front of the BON because of your history, have a lawyer with you as IMO the BON is not the nurse's friend--you need someone on your side fighting solely for your interests.

    Best of luck.


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