Useless degree! At what point do you quit trying? - pg.5 | allnurses

Useless degree! At what point do you quit trying? - page 5

I have my BSN, passed my NCLEX and haven't found a job in 2 years. Not through lack of effort mind you, but i live in Philadelphia, where the job market is basically nil for new grads. I applied to... Read More

  1. Visit  SuburbanGypsy profile page
    1
    Quote from Hurleygrly137, RN
    But would you feel happy having stopped at high school, "pushing a mop around" as you stated and making that STARTING rate? You have to realize, it's just that. a starting rate. You think they're rate climb as high as yours would having started at the same rate? Also you can grin & bear that rate then transfer to where you are happier. I mean, if I had a choice to just "push a mop around for $20 and not use my education. Or do nursing work for barely higher, I would w/o a doubt choose nursing and get experience while doing it.
    I am not a status seeker. I could work anywhere.

    The reason i went into nursing is because my entire life, i am predisposed to automatically help people.
    That's just who i am.
    A natural caregiver.
    Nursing just seemed like the most logical choice for what i feel is my calling.

    I'm just wondering why it has reached the point where people educate themselves to the point of extreme debt, and are in no better shape starting out.

    BUT
    It's very disheartening when you hear one thing in school, and the real world doesn't seem to reflect that.
    Why not give a more realistic view on what to expect.

    That's what's got me the most bitter. It the misrepresentations that i received in school.
    That nursing was a booming profession when in reality, it's not anymore.
    Not_A_Hat_Person likes this.
  2. Visit  RN_2005 profile page
    1
    The supposed "nursing shortage" is ********. The term is used merely as a means for [primarily] 2-year colleges to drum up business. And if you are a 'mature' student, say 40-45+, going back to school to finally get that degree, nursing or otherwise, you might as well throw your money to the wind. No one wants to hire older workers anymore .... NO ONE. Discrimination? Yes, but employers have found many creative ways around it so as not to be held to it legally. Just sayin ....
    Aviationurse likes this.
  3. Visit  PacoUSA profile page
    2
    Quote from RN_2005
    And if you are a 'mature' student, say 40-45+, going back to school to finally get that degree, nursing or otherwise, you might as well throw your money to the wind. No one wants to hire older workers anymore .... NO ONE. Discrimination? Yes, but employers have found many creative ways around it so as not to be held to it legally. Just sayin ....
    I beg to differ: your claim that "NO ONE wants to hire older workers anymore" is simply NOT TRUE.

    I fall into that 40-45 range you posted, and I just graduated in 2012 from a top NYC metro area nursing school. I had a job offer right after graduation in May and started working 45 days later. My classmate who is 63 was also hired on the same unit a few months later ... again, graduated in 2012 from a top NYC metro area nursing school with BSNs. Yes, the job market is tough out there, but it's not impossible to find work. Fortunately, our hospital values the nurse with life experience enough to give us a chance, and we are proving our worth 10 times over.
    en1024 and Altra like this.
  4. Visit  danarooo profile page
    0
    I feel your pain. It took me a long time to find a job, and it's not even in a "clinica" area. I looked into volunteering, but any place that I could have had a chance to even be around and meet other RN's were already flooded with volunteers (probably new grad RNs) and weren't taking any more. Moving wasn't an option for me either. I know moving may have to be done, but with no job (which = no money) and kids, and if your husband travels and can't leave his job (military, contracted etc...) then moving is just another suggestion that works for others but isn't feasable for you. I started by doing flu shots and public health screenings with an agency. They would not let me do homehealth because most homehealth agencies require a specific amount of experience on trachs and other things because you don't have the safety net of other nurses on a unit like in a hospital to ask when you are stuck - your in a home and your it. In my area, LTC's hire way more LPNs and the RNs run the floor, so these spots are usually filled too (as stated by several DONs I cold called).

    The market is horrible, and it really is who you know. Joining your states nursing association can be expensive, and if you don't work as a nurse and are new to an area (like I was) than meeting nurses is almost impossible. Refine your resume. Hiring someone to write it or rewrite is can be a bit expensive, I looked in to it. I went online and did my own research and picked a few different templates and modeled my resume after them and began to get a few more calls (make a spreadsheet to track which resume gets the most responses). It was still hard as hell to get hired. I took a job that at first seemed great, but now is turning into a frustration because of a micromanaging boss who isn't a nurse at all and some of the things I was promised would happen in the future I am now seeing will not...but I have a job (love the job, not the mircromanaging non-nurse boss --nice person, bad boss). I now have a paycheck and can join my nursing association, pay someone to look at my resume and pay for CE's and nursing refresher classes. I am now able to meet other nurses occasionally and have started developing relationships. Although I'm not getting that all important clinical experience, I am closer to being able to do that. As long as you can get a job somewhere in nursing you can begin to work your way toward your goal, yes it's long and hard and frustrating but you can do it!

    These hospitals (& other facilities) who are messing over new grads (and seasoned nurses), they will need us some day and things won't always be totally on their terms. These RN's returning from retirement will have to leave nursing again because it's hard work and they are aging. You may be able to build on your nursing degree and take it in another direction, open a business related to nursing (apply for grant money), or go into a feild that will accept a nursing degree (drug reps?). If your state uses Medication Aides (or techs) then get yourself certified to teach those classes (or CNA classes if your state doesn't require X amount of experience in a specific setting to get certified). Look at medispas, they use RN's (it's not "meat & potatos" nursing skills but it's a job). Get yourself certified to teach first aid/cpr/aed for lay and healthcare providers too (not too terribly expensive, you may have to borrow from someone or save up for it). If you can get out there in any way and be able to say "I'm and RN" that will help you build some connections. I wish you the best of luck. There are so many options, but you don't know what you don't know so turn over every rock you come across.


    Good luck!
  5. Visit  LadyFree28 profile page
    0
    Suburban Gypsy:

    First, I know 2 childhood friends who are ADNs that took two years to find a position. One is a public health nurse for the department of health, the other moved out if state and got a job in Virginia-she now works at Einstein MC.
    As aloof as I may sound, I still believe that you will find a job.

    I know my job is hiring, and they have a preceptorship. In the past, they have accepted people in your situation, and I have precepted in this program.The program is 18 months. We've had 6 people in the program, 2 got hired at a local children's hospital, one is a candidate at another children's hospital. I have accepted a position at a PICU, based on the working relationships with both area Children's hospitals. The also have a home are division that are in need of nurses as well. I'm not sure if you are interested in pediatrics as well as working with children with special needs, but It may be a start of getting a great base of nursing experience. This has been my specialty for 7 years as an LPN, so I am a new grad with LPN experience, and that got me 200 rejections a week. A nurse recruiter at a local area hospital gave me tips on improving my rsum....I tweaked it, and kept improving it, and I started getting phone calls until the position I start in February which hired new grads contacted me...that process took about 8 months. I have friends who got acceptance jobs that couldn't take the job because of hiring freezes...they turned aground and still got a job-took them about 4 months, one accepted a dialysis job as a new grad and loves it...some had jobs before they left school. My cohorts range from 21-50+ traditional-2nd degree and non traditional students. It just happens I guess...pardon my aloofness again. If you don't want to try my job, You can teach CNAs at Red Cross, Health Department, HH is willing to train someone in your position and give you a chance. If you are SERIOUSLY considering finding some avenues, please feel free to PM me.
  6. Visit  Medgurl32 profile page
    0
    Quote from Paco-RN

    I beg to differ: your claim that "NO ONE wants to hire older workers anymore" is simply NOT TRUE.

    I fall into that 40-45 range you posted, and I just graduated in 2012 from a top NYC metro area nursing school. I had a job offer right after graduation in May and started working 45 days later. My classmate who is 63 was also hired on the same unit a few months later ... again, graduated in 2012 from a top NYC metro area nursing school with BSNs. Yes, the job market is tough out there, but it's not impossible to find work. Fortunately, our hospital values the nurse with life experience enough to give us a chance, and we are proving our worth 10 times over.
    Well I would like to know what school you attended because im looking for one in Nyc
  7. Visit  Anoetos profile page
    1
    Quote from RN_2005
    The supposed "nursing shortage" is ********. The term is used merely as a means for [primarily] 2-year colleges to drum up business. And if you are a 'mature' student, say 40-45+, going back to school to finally get that degree, nursing or otherwise, you might as well throw your money to the wind. No one wants to hire older workers anymore .... NO ONE. Discrimination? Yes, but employers have found many creative ways around it so as not to be held to it legally. Just sayin ....
    Also not true. I graduated at 46 years old and am now 47. I have a great job, that I love, as a staff nurse in a medical progressive unit.

    I don't know how many times I can say this, but GET A JOB IN A HOSPITAL BEFORE YOU GRADUATE.
    PacoUSA likes this.
  8. Visit  pbajil profile page
    0
    SuburbanGypsy - I live in the area and sent you a PM.
  9. Visit  kcdunlap profile page
    0
    I live in the Philly area. I have been busting my butt to find a nursing job for a year. I have finally had to relocate. I just received a job offer in Hazleton, PA. I sent my application to them and I heard back in 1 day....

    If you are looking for any type of nursing job to pay the bills while you continue to look for another job PM me I have some leads that might work.
  10. Visit  lmlong57 profile page
    0
    Casper, WY. Graduate Nurse Job opening 2-3 times a year. Surgical, PCU, Medical, Neuro to name a few. www.wmcnet.org
  11. Visit  Cindycin37 profile page
    0
    Where are those places?
  12. Visit  RNitis profile page
    0
    I live in CT and have been finding the same issue here (the ones who call me back-seldom...usually get the denial e-mail- or I actually am able to speak to state "you need 1 year of experience" -one place said 6 months). I have crazy loans from getting my Associate Degree from a private school. I definitely want to go back for my Bachelors (NOT at the same school), but I find myself wondering, why? If I can't even find a position with my associates. I graduated in Sept 2010, RN licensed Nov 2010 and still everyday I'm trying and trying. I've done a lot of apps online, I've gone to LTC's in person, I talk to anyone I see wearing scrubs no matter where they are! I've attempted to contact students (most don't respond back). Worse part is, I worked at a hospital while attending school, gave up my more-paying-with-insurance-job to do so, and it blew up in my face because the nursing supervisor had no intention of hiring me, but wouldn't say it. So, here I sit, still jobless after 2 years and getting as frustrated as said OP. I got depressed for awhile, but now just laugh when I get a call or an e-mail stating they "have taken other candidates that more closely match the job descriptions. Good luck with your job search." (I realized I can't get bummed out or discouraged with all of the denials or I'll never get a job!)...I have gotten advice and new resume from career counselor at school. I've gone to CT works (state unemployment office) to have my resume looked at again. I've resent my resumes to places I've already applied at. I can't move, won't bother explaining, but yes, it is impossible for me to move at the current time, there is no "if there is a will, there is a way"...and at this point, I don't believe I'm considered a "new grad" any longer. I'm just an RN with no experience. The career counselor stated "It's slim if not impossible to find an RN position after a year from graduating, never mind 2 years. There was one other student that contacted him from my class with the same problem, but she recently found a position." He was able to tell me who, I tried, no response. I follow up with my apps and get no call backs, if I do reach someone, they state we do not do resume follow ups over the phone, check back online. I do not wish my circumstances on anyone, but I find comfort in knowing it isn't just me with this problem. Anyone with suggestions, I will gladly take...
  13. Visit  kcdunlap profile page
    0
    Quote from Really new RN
    I live in CT and have been finding the same issue here (the ones who call me back-seldom...usually get the denial e-mail- or I actually am able to speak to state "you need 1 year of experience" -one place said 6 months). ...
    Do you live in a part of CT where you could travel to a nearby state and find work?


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